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Goodbye from Hay

A bumper end to the Bank Holiday with Neil Gaiman and Stephen Fry

What a closing session that was, we had an hour of chat about myths, readings from Stephen Fry, Neil Gaiman - and his wife Amanda Palmer, all illustrated live by the fantastic artistic talents of Chris Riddell. The session will be available soon on BBC iPlayer and on this website.

Thanks for watching our live coverage over the last three days from Hay's 30th anniversary edition. There is plenty more to come from Hay, so look out for highlights here in the coming days and over next weekend.

The Hay Festival
BBC
The Hay Festival

We are live now...

Press the play icon on the carousel above 'Neil Gaiman and Stephen Fry'

Stephen Fry and Neil Gaiman are on stage to celebrate the tales and myths of Northern and Mediterranean Europe. And Chris Riddell is drawing live alongside!

Tony Robinson: 'I though the Blackadder script was rubbish'

Speaking at Hay last night, the actor talked about his initial impression of the Blackadder pilot and how went on to change his life.... and on being about 12th choice for the role.

The actor's first impression of the Blackadder pilot and how went on to change his life.

Good afternoon on Bank Holiday Monday

We're at The Hay Festival again today - the main event is a sold-out session featuring Stephen Fry and Neil Gaiman. Myth Makers is a celebration of the tales and myths of Northern and Mediterranean Europe - that ask, brutally and beautifully, what it means to be human. Tune in to watch what will be a fantastic hour from 5.30pm BST.

Gaiman’s newly published Norse Mythology reaches back to the source stories that have inspired Tolkien, the Marvel comics and Game of Thrones. And Fry's forthcoming Mythos reimagines versions of the Greek myths.

Neil Gaiman and Stephen Fry
BBC
Neil Gaiman and Stephen Fry

The gods, monsters, heroes, titans, nymphs, demons and mortals that populate this matchless world.

Stephen Fry

Another fine day at Hay!

We're signing off on our live coverage for today, but we'll be back tomorrow afternoon with Neil Gaiman and Stephen Fry talking Norse and Greek mythology. What better way to round off a Bank Holiday weekend?

In the meantime, here's a taste of the sun-kissed Hay site earlier today...

Hay Festival site
BBC
Festivalgoer at Hay
BBC
Festivalgoers at Hay
BBC
Festivalgoer at Hay
BBC
Festivalgoers at Hay
BBC
Hay Festival site
BBC

Rethinking the internet

Here's Stephen Fry talking about the lecture he gave last night for Hay's Reformations series. You can watch the full talk in the carousel above.

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Bookclub with Hari Kunzru

James Naughtie hosted a recording of the latest edition of BBC Radio 4's Bookclub in the BBC Tent earlier today. Hari Kunzru discussed his 2011 novel Gods Without Men in front of the Hay audience.

It will be broadcast on Radio 4 at 16:00 next Sunday.

James Naughtie and Hari Kunzru
BBC

Live now: Tracey Emin

Tracey Emin
BBC

Tracey Emin’s art is one of disclosure, using her life events as inspiration for works ranging from painting, drawing, video and installation, to photography, needlework and sculpture. She talks to the editor of GQ magazine, Dylan Jones.

From the Hay Vaults

Helena Kennedy, speaking at Hay in 2006

"Prepare for the internet of the future, or face the worst of science fiction's predictions"

Here's how our colleagues at BBC News reported on Stephen Fry's thought-provoking lecture, which took place last night. You can watch the entire talk right here.

Is Trainspotting the best book of the past 30 years?

Reviewer Daniel Jacobson thinks so. There's still time to submit your own review of your favourite book published since 1987, as part of the #Hay30Books campaign. Just use our interactive page.

Book montage
BBC

Sorry for the slight delay...

We're expecting Garry Kasparov on stage any moment. It's a full house...

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View more on twitter

Live now: Garry Kasparov

Garry Kasparov
BBC

Twenty years ago, in May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. He talks to Hay Festival President Stephen Fry about a watershed moment in the history of technology: machine intelligence had arrived at the point where it could best human intellect.

What did Jane Austen really look like?

Lucy Worsley
BBC

At her sold-out Hay talk last night, historian Lucy Worsley explained that the literary legend bore little resemblance to her image on the new £10 note...

Elif Shafak on why stories matter.

The Turkish novelist will be speaking at Hay next weekend.

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Ed's embarrassing Strictly faux pas

The former MP, speaking at Hay yesterday, told how he made a hilariously rude mistake while filming Strictly Come Dancing.

From the Hay Vaults

Al Gore, speaking at Hay in 2006

Hay in a Day: Saturday

A host of Hay speakers and visitors answered the question: which fictional character would you like to be Prime Minister?

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Broadcasting House in the BBC Tent

BBC Radio 4's Sunday morning magazine programme came live from the BBC Tent at Hay this morning. Host Paddy O'Connell was joined by guests including John Sergeant. Listen back on the carousel above.

Broadcasting House
BBC
Broadcasting House
BBC
John Sergeant
BBC

Dive in to our Tom Daley coverage

The popular Olympian had some of the longest queues of the day at the Hay Festival bookshop yesterday following his talk, which you can now watch in full on BBC iPlayer or on the carousel above. Here he tells of a moment from the Beijing Olympics that left a lasting impression...

Graham Norton on his unexpected critical acclaim

The comedian and chat show host - speaking at the festival last night - admitted he was surprised at the positive reviews his debut novel received.

From the Hay Vaults

Philip Pullman, speaking at Hay in 2005

Stephen Fry sounds a warning over the future of the internet

Stephen Fry
BBC

If you missed our live stream last night you can now catch up on Stephen Fry's fascinating lecture about the future of society in the internet age. Watch it over on BBC iPlayer or on the carousel above.

Here's a taste:

Stephen Fry on why we must embrace the new technology that will shape our future.

Welcome back!

We're at The Hay Festival again today, bringing you the latest news and highlights from the 30th anniversary edition, including live streams from Garry Kasparov and Tracey Emin. The sun is now well and truly out after yesterday's grey skies, and the site is full of book fans enjoying the weather.

Crowds at Hay
BBC

Time for us to hit the hay

See you again tomorrow

That's all from us for today, but we're back tomorrow for more live coverage from Hay, including chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov and artist Tracey Emin.

There's also still time to nominate your essential book from the last 30 years across fiction and non-fiction. So far, 29 books have already been nominated:

  • Oblivion: A Memoir by Héctor Abad (2010)
  • Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (2006)
  • A Golden Age by Tahmima Anam (2007)
  • Kid by Simon Armitage (1992)
  • Any Human Heart by William Boyd (2002)
  • Wise Children by Angela Carter (1991)
  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (2015)
  • How To Train Your Dragon series by Cressida Cowell (2010)
  • ONE by Sarah Crossan (2015)
  • Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond (1997)
  • Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives by David Eagleman (2009)
  • Headscarves and Hymens by Mona Eltahawy (2015)
  • God Is Not Great by Christopher Hitchens (2007)
  • Dr. Tatiana’s Sex Advice to All Creation by Olivia Judson (2002)
  • The Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein (2007)
  • The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot by Robert Macfarlane (2012)
  • A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry (1995)
  • Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell (2004)
  • A Gentle Plea for Chaos by Mirabel Osler (1989)
  • Chronicles of Ancient Darkness series by Michelle Paver (2004)
  • East West Street by Philippe Sands (2016)
  • How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff (2004)
  • The Bookseller of Kabul by Asne Seierstad (2002)
  • A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth (1993)
  • Pink Mist by Owen Sheers (2013)
  • There But For The… by Ali Smith (2011)
  • Far from the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity by Andrew Solomon (2012)
  • The Road Home by Rose Tremain (2007)
  • Finding Violet Park by Jenny Valentine (2007)

Not seen your favourite? Why not convince us of your top book by leaving a review on our interactive page, or let us know on social media using #HAY30BOOKS. The 30th book will be crowned on Sunday afternoon.

See you on the morrow.

Book montage
BBC

Hay Makers

Hannah Burson, Old Electric Shop bar

Hannah Burson sits in her bar, the Old Electric Shop, Hay-on-Wye
Hay Festival
Hannah Burson sits in her bar, the Old Electric Shop, Hay-on-Wye

There are a large number of people here who like to offset the lack of things to do by creating things to do. They congregate here, so interesting things happen, which perhaps you would not expect, because it’s a small border town. And in most small border towns, nothing much happens at all. We have poetry nights, comedy, music, cocktails. Atmosphere, you know.

Throughout the day, we will be telling the modern history of Hay-on-Wye through the words of the people who make it what it is.

Hay Makers

Jeanette Barker, the Granary, Hay-on-Wye.

I have a picture at home of Broad Street from when I was little, and there’s not one person on it, and that’s what Hay was like back then. I thought I would die of boredom as a youngster, but then things started to happen. The farming has changed, because of the economy, the way people shop too. It’s changed Hay completely. Hay looks the same, but the people have changed. Some things have been odd, some things strange, but it’s not boring anymore; and it’s so good for young people.

Throughout the day, we will be telling the modern history of Hay-on-Wye through the words of the people who make it what it is.

Watch Stephen Fry LIVE

Stephen Fry
Hay Festival

Click the play icon above to watch Stephen Fry as he re-imagines the internet. Can the great invention of recent times still stay something for everyone in the age of social media, hacking and global connectivity?

Hay Makers

Andrew Williams, Eighteen Rabbit fair trade shop.

Andrew Williams, proprietor of Eighteen Rabbit, stands in his shop in Hay-on-Wye
Hay Festival
Andrew Williams, proprietor of Eighteen Rabbit, Hay-on-Wye

Hay has always been a weird place, you go back hundreds of years, and it’s been a magnet for eccentrics, weirdos, call them what you will. There is a real spirit that runs through this place, and when you get that groundswell, it creates a snowball effect. When we left London a lot of people said we would be bored in a backwater, but actually it’s the opposite. Hay’s a border town that takes inspiration from both sides. It’s always changing.

Throughout the day, we will be telling the modern history of Hay-on-Wye through the words of the people who make it what it is.

Amy Macdonald on her inspiration

From the Hay Vaults

Jane Fonda, speaking at Hay in 2005

"Women are people too"

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Finnish writer Maria Turtschaninoff explains why she thinks equal rights were the most important invention ever.

Letters Live at Hay

Letter-writing is often called a lost art but, at the Hay Festival, a diverse cast of actors and musicians celebrated the variety and magic of written communication.

Letters Live cast takes a bow
Hay Festival
Letters Live cast takes a bow
Louise Brealey reads a letter at the Hay Festival
Hay Festival
Louise Brealey reads a letter at the Hay Festival
Stephen Fry, Juliet Stephenson and James Rhodes after Letters Live
Hay Festival
Stephen Fry, Juliet Stephenson and James Rhodes after Letters Live
Tony Robinson reads a letter at the Hay Festival
Hay Festival
Tony Robinson reads a letter at the Hay Festival

From the Hay Vaults

Margaret Atwood, speaking at Hay in 2006

View more on youtube

An adaptation of Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale begins tomorrow night on Channel 4.

Hay Makers

Derek Addyman, Addyman Books.

I don’t get to many events at the Festival, because I’m always working, but the best thing I ever saw was Ian Dury. He had cancer at the time, but he just sang through the pain. The vodka helped though, I think.

Throughout the day, we will be telling the modern history of Hay-on-Wye through the words of the people who make it what it is.

From the Hay Vaults

Clive James, speaking at Hay in 2004

From the Hay Vaults

Maya Angelou, speaking at Hay in 2002

Hay Makers

Penny Chantler, Hill Farm, Llanigon

I started to get involved in the festival in 2002. I’d broken my ankle and they were short of people in the Box Office. They rang up and said that since I couldn’t do anything useful up here, I may as well go down there. The festival was really growing by then and they needed people, so I just fell into it. It’s a great contrast to farming, you get a bit of cabin fever up here, lovely though it is. So coming down to the festival and getting bombarded by loads of people is great.

Throughout the day, we will be telling the modern history of Hay-on-Wye through the words of the people who make it what it is.