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Tagged with: North east wales

Posts (15)

  1. The world's first passenger hovercraft

    James Roberts

    Half a century ago the future of transport appeared on a beach in north Wales. The hovercraft service from Rhyl to Moreton beach, Merseyside - the first of its kind in the world - was unleashed to masses of enthralled onlookers. This was the way forward - or so it seemed. The Vickers-Armstr...

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  2. The tragedy of Tom Pryce, Wales' Formula One hero

    James Roberts

    Monday 5 March is the 35th anniversary of the death of Welsh Formula One driver Tom Pryce. The man from Nantglyn near Ruthin was tipped for F1 championship glory by many of his contemporaries, but at the age of just 27 his life and career were cut short in one of the most bizarre, tragic acciden...

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  3. Wales and the world's first passenger helicopter service

    Phil Carradice

    These days we regularly see helicopters flashing over head and think nothing more about it but in the immediate post-war days, helicopters were a rare sight in the skies above Britain. So, it comes as something of a surprise to find that the world's first scheduled passenger helicopter servi...

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  4. Wrexham County Borough Museum reopens after £2m facelift

    BBC Wales History

    The revamped Wrexham County Borough Museum and Archives officially threw open its doors once again yesterday. The museum has just undergone a £2 million facelift, and over the past 12 months has been modernised to include a wealth of new attractions and interactive displays. Wrexham Coun...

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  5. Henry Morton Stanley statue to go on show

    BBC Wales History

    In just over six weeks' time, a life-size bronze sculpture of Welsh explorer Henry Morton Stanley will be erected in front of the Denbigh Library Museum and Gallery. Stanley, who was born in Denbigh in 1841, became famous for trekking through African jungle to find Scottish explorer Dr David ...

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  6. The Welshman who gave London clean water

    Phil Carradice

    On 10 December 1631 Sir Hugh Middleton, a truly unsung Welsh hero, died quietly at his home in London. He came from Galch Hill outside Denbigh in North Wales. Sir Hugh Middleton ensured that the people of London finally got decent drinking water. Sir Hugh was the sixth son of Richard M...

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  7. Hillfort glow

    BBC Wales History

    On Sunday 5 December there is an opportunity to participate in a special historical experiment. The hillfort glow experiment takes place in December North east Wales' Heather and Hillforts Project and Cheshire West and Chester's Habitats and Hillforts Project will attempt to communicate by torchlight between 10 ancient hillforts. The experiment, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, willl involve local people close to 10 hillforts on the Sandstone Ridge, the Clwydian Range, Halkyn Mountain and the Wirral and aims to see if glowing fires could have been seen across the hills and acted as a communication or warning system. Iron Age settlements can be found on many of the summits of the Sandstone Ridge, Clwydian Range and surrounding hills, dating back around 2,500 years. Flares will be launched from the hillforts followed by torch light at Maiden Castle, Beeston Castle, Kelsborrow, Helsby, Burton Point, Moel y Gaer Rhosesmor, Penycloddiau, Moel Arthur, Moel Fenlli and Caer Drewyn. Volunteers can help with this mass experiment by helping to man each of the 10 hilltop signaling points. Places are strictly limited, so to register to help as a volunteer for your local hillfort, visit.habitatsandhillforts.co.uk. Once registered, volunteers will be sent information packs with exact timings to meet and what to bring. Further details about the Hillfort Glow experiment can be found on the North east Wales' Heather and Hillforts Project website.

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  8. National Library of Wales to visit Wrexham

    BBC Wales History

    This autumn, the National Library of Wales is heading to Wrexham. Throughout October and November, a series of films, lectures and debates have been arranged in locations throughout the town. Highlights include: Thursday 7 October: The Proud Valley, a 1940 film featuring Paul Robeso...

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  9. Onedin Line tall ship to revisit north Wales

    BBC Wales History

    A ship that once appeared in the popular 1970s BBC television drama The Onedin Line will once again be sailing along the north Wales coast. The ship, called Kathleen and May, is Britain's last three-masted topsail schooner. It was built for Captain John Coppack in 1900 in Connah's Quay in Flintshire, for cargo trading around the Irish Sea. The Kathleen and May was renamed the Charlotte Rhodes for the BBC Show. Made of oak and pine, it was found derelict back in 1998 by her owners Steve and Marilyn Clarke, who restored it over a period of two years. It was completed at a cost of £2 million. From next March, the ship will based at Liverpool's Cannign Dock but will be used for overnight trips along the north Wales coast, as well as making journeys to Cumbria, the Isle of Man and Ireland. Peter Gilmore as Captain James Onedin and Anne Stallybrass as Anne The Onedin Line was a popular British television series that ran from 1971 through 1980. Set in the 1860s, the drama followed the fortunes of James Onedin (played by Peter Gilmore), an ambitious, clever and determined shipowner whose private life was as tempestuous than the seas he sailed. Feel free to comment! If you want to have your say, on this or any other BBC blog, you will need to sign in to your BBC iD account. If you don't have a BBC iD account, you can register here - it'll allow you to contribute to a range of BBC sites and services using a single login. Need some assistance? Read about BBC iD, or get some help with registering.

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  10. Henry Morton Stanley: statue or no statue?

    Phil Carradice

    Most people have heard of Henry Morton Stanley. He was the man who was sent to find David Livingstone and supposedly greeted him with the words: "Dr Livingstone, I presume?" It is quite possible that Stanley never uttered that immortal phrase but, perhaps more importantly, a row has recently ...

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