bbc.co.uk Navigation

Maggie Shiels

Google and the mobile future

  • Maggie Shiels
  • 23 Sep 08, 09:10 GMT

There are more mobile phones than cars or credit cards in the world. That's a figure that Google's engineering director Andy Rubin highlights in a company blog ahead of it's release of what has been dubbed the new Gphone by T-Mobile using Google's Android operating system.

As well as being ubiquitous, Mr Rubin maintains cellphones are "Ten times more powerful than the PC you had on your desk only eight or nine years ago."

He writes, "It has a range of sensors that would do a martian lander proud, a clock, power sensors, thermometer, and light meter on the more basic phones; a location sensor, accelerometer and maybe even a compass on more advanced ones. And most importantly, it is by its very nature always connected."

So given its popularity and necessity, Mr Rubin ponders just how we might use our phones in the future.

I won't go through the list because you can read it for yourself here.

Nothing in there about simply making a call. So yesterday huh?

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    Geeks will love the Android. Everyone else will wonder what all the fuss is about.

  • Comment number 2.

    @twelveightyone

    From the tone of your comment I'm guessing you have an iPhone :-)



    I think this phone sounds interesting, would be good to have an open, dynamic market for the next generation of phones. The more manufacturers the better, so we won't have to wait around for dinosaurs like MS, Apple, Sony ect to get their acts together and it should also force them to stop pretending that 5 year old technology is cutting edge.

  • Comment number 3.

    @ringsting-iom,

    You guessed right my friend. An awesome device, unmatched by anything on the market.

    The App Store is the #1 reason it will continue to be my favourite phone. I have 5 'pages' of Apps now!

    Android is a good idea, but I just can't see it getting past the HomeBrew boys and girls. Too many devices, configurations and problems. It's like Microsoft all over again - trying to be compatible with anything and everything.

  • Comment number 4.

    More phones in the world than credit cards? I know a lot of teens (and even younger kids) have phones but when I think that I run six cards and only one phone I wonder how that all adds up. Don't doubt the veracity of the statistic (though I'd like to know the source) just intrigued.

  • Comment number 5.

    @twelveightyone

    'It's like Microsoft all over again - trying to be compatible with anything and everything.'

    Yup, and look where that got them, 95% of the market!

    And at the moment, the App Store is the #1 reason why the iPhone and Apple's controlling system can suck. Applications being rejected for apparently recreating features of iTunes. Couple this with even more developers annoyed by the NDA, stopping them from discussing the platform with other developers!

    And honestly, do you use all those applications? I have 3 pages of apps on my iPhone and only use a few 3rd party applications.

    I very much respect Google, and believe the new mobile experiences on Android and the iPhone will filter down to the average consumer. These guys love the web, and the whole announcement yesterday for the G1 was centered around its web capabilities.

    We are facing a platform war in the mobile space, and it will be interesting to see who wins, or whether a few companies can hold a decent market share percentage.

 

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

BBC.co.uk