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Wednesday 24th February 1pm BBC2

SH Line Producer | 15:19 UK time, Wednesday, 24 February 2010

We all hope never to have to enlist the help of the emergency services, but if the occasion arises and we do need them, the ambulance service, fire-brigade and police are just a phone call away.  But dialling 999 is not an option if you're unable to speak to, or hear, the operator at the other end.    Police throughout the UK have been thinking of ways to improve the service they offer to D/deaf and hard of hearing people with several initiatives, for instance, an emergency SMS text messaging service or a crime prevention survey in your own home.  Memnos Costi investigates two such schemes in operation in Hertfordshire and the West Midlands.  

 

Also on today's programme, roughly 1.5 million people in the UK use hearing aids but according to RNID research the number could be closer to 4 million.  Hearing aids can transform lives but it seems many people are reluctant to wear them.  Armed with her grandmother's hearing aid from the 1930s Maggie Philbin visits one of the UK's biggest manufacturers to look at hearing aids, past, present and future.  

 

We also catch up with the England Deaf Cricket team as they get themselves in shape for summer fixtures and the World Cup in New Zealand later this year.  There are strict qualifying criteria; all players have to have an average hearing loss of 55DB or over and to remove any hearing instruments during games.  But like any other England sports team, it seems beating the Aussies is the best bit.

https://www.cricketdeafengland.co.uk

https://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/cricket/8530905.stm

 

 

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