Archives for November 2011

Tom Lewis' Moules Mariniere recipe

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 13:00 UK time, Wednesday, 30 November 2011

Here is the latest recipe from The Kitchen Café, to be downloaded, kept and printed.

Download Tom Lewis' Moules Mariniere

The Kitchen Café is on BBC Radio Scotland, every Wednesday 1315-1400.

Jazz House: A history of the saxophone part three: John Coltrane

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 10:43 UK time, Wednesday, 30 November 2011

On the 9th November 2011 BBC Radio Scotland's Jazz House broadcast one of their "A history of..." series during which Richard Michael dissects a key jazz instrument in front of a live studio audience.

In the first part we heard about the tenor sax and In the second part the alto sax. In this third part Richard Michael and Gordon McNeil return to the tenor saxophone to consider John Coltrane...



Jazz House: A history of the saxophone part two: alto

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 13:55 UK time, Tuesday, 29 November 2011

On the 9th November 2011 BBC Radio Scotland's Jazz House broadcast one of their "A history of..." series during which Richard Michael dissects a key jazz instrument in front of a live studio audience.

In the first part we heard about the tenor sax and In this second part, hear saxophonist Gordon McNeil accompanied by Richard Michael on piano, demonstrate the alto sax, and here some of the musicians who made the instrument their own including the great Charlie Parker.

PTA: how to script a comedy pilot

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 09:05 UK time, Tuesday, 29 November 2011

In anticipation of the second episode of the new BBC Radio Scotland comedy PTA which airs today (29 November 2011) at 1405, producer Margaret-Anne Docherty tells us a little bit about episode two of the series and chats about the process of pulling together a pilot script:

Jazz House: A history of the saxophone part one: tenor

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 12:37 UK time, Monday, 28 November 2011

On the 9th November 2011 BBC Radio Scotland's Jazz House broadcast one of their "A history of..." series during which Richard Michael dissects a key jazz instrument in front of a live studio audience. The omni saxophonist was Gordon McNeil, with Richard Michael at the piano. The saxophonists and their styles illustrated were Johnny Hodges, Colman Hawkins, Lester Young, Ben Webster, Charlie Parker, Paul Desmond, John Coltrane ending with Scotland's own Joe Temperley.

Over the next four days here on the blog, we'll give you another chance to hear about the alto, baritone, and first of all, the tenor, saxophone...

Sunday Morning: Countdown to Christmas

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Cathy MacDonald Cathy MacDonald | 05:00 UK time, Sunday, 27 November 2011

It's the first Sunday of Advent and on this week's Sunday Morning programme, my special first hour guest, is best selling author and journalist, Tobias Jones - an interesting man, who spent a year travelling around Italy, before returning to Britain and opening up a community for people going through troubled times. I don't think I could give up a regular, family life to live in this kind of way, but clearly this is an innovative and indeed selfless man, whose vision and principles go beyond the ordinary.

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Newsweek Scotland: Birthdays, Christmas and a Shrinking Economy

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Derek Bateman Derek Bateman | 17:30 UK time, Friday, 25 November 2011

I was wondering what to write about this week because I've been a bit obsessed with personal stuff, namely how to cope with TWO little girl birthdays in one week and how I'm going to get through Christmas having made, as yet, no plans to speak of. Nor having any money to speak of.

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Shereen: Exploring the News

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Shereen Nanjiani Shereen Nanjiani | 16:30 UK time, Friday, 25 November 2011

For this week's show I've been talking to one of "the Hudson's Bay Boys". For those of you who are too young to remember, hundreds of young Scots left home between the 60s and the 80s to work for fur traders, the Hudson's Bay Company in the Canadian Arctic. Many of them stayed to make a life there. Now they've been reunited for a BBC Scotland documentary to be screened next week - Watch a clip of the programme below.

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Tom's top tale - ghosts

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Tom Morton Tom Morton | 13:30 UK time, Friday, 25 November 2011

Ghosts, even if you don't believe in them, was one topic on this week's Tom Morton Shows. Provoking this very creepy missive from Brian Crossland:

In the mid eighties I was staying - on business - at a large modern hotel in Sollihull near Birmingham.

Was woken up around 1am by the sound of a large fight, breaking glass etc. outside of my bedroom door. Opened the door to see what was going on - nobody there......,

Feeling very uneasy, could not go back to sleep, so left light on. About five minutes later the bulb exploded......,

When the bed started to shake I decided I'd had enough.....,

I checked out after speaking to the night porter who had no knowledge of any fight or of any reportings of strange goings on.

Drove to motorway service station on M6 near Coventry and slept in the car park.

I do not really believe in any of that ghost, spirit, afterlife stuff, but, I have never been back to that hotel and never will.....,


Interval Music

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Ricky Ross Ricky Ross | 12:05 UK time, Friday, 25 November 2011

I don't want to bore you about how good Gillian Welch and Dave Rawlings were the other night, especially if you couldn't make it. But there is something worthy of a little discussion here coming from that brilliant night: Interval Music. Who listens? Who picks it? How loud and how good should it be?

Gill and Dave's selection was spot on. A less secure act would have thought twice about coming back on and even I did wonder at the what might come next....

Charlie Rich - Behind Closed Doors, The Louvin Brothers and two George Jones songs that were worth leaving your house for..... a risky game to play. I remember as a kid noticing some band playing the Last Record Album as a pre gig tape.....I thought they must be crazy, how could they top that. If memory serves me well, though, they did. Perhaps it's the very act of raising the bar and saying 'There is an entire Universe of pop music out there and frankly, we feel that's great but it's inspired us to create ...THIS!

People tell me the Alison Krauss show was also a great night at the Armadillo. I wonder what they played before they came on stage? Feel free to let me know. I know this much about that day...Alison was in fine form and chatting to us about everything. We talked early bluegrass days, her first solo adventures, picking songs, Robert Plant and of course 'Oh Brother Where Art Thou.' She told us about T Bone and gave us a little insight into why a song might be cut by her and others left on the shelf. She has one of the sweetest voices in popular music, she is the recipient of 36 Grammys (at the last count) and she is a very nice person to be around. Experience Alison Krauss in full this Friday on Another Country.



The Free Wheelin' Bob Dylan

We have new music from A.A. Bondy, My Darling Clementine, Crooked Still and a new solo project from Craig Finn. (from The Hold Steady) We'll also dip into the Dylan album with one of the most iconic covers of all time .......


........and play you where he was in 1963. It's all in Another Country this Friday on BBC Radio Scotland. The fun starts at five past eight.

Take the Floor Events Guide w/c 25 Nov

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Simone Byrne Simone Byrne | 11:50 UK time, Friday, 25 November 2011

Your weekend guide to ceilidh and traditional music events in Scotland for the next seven days, brought to you by the Take the Floor team.


FRIDAY 25TH NOVEMBER
Festival
Fiddle 2011 - Queen's Hall Edinburgh, The Scots Fiddle Festival

Concert
Old Meldrum - British Legion Hall - Johnny Duncan - 8pm

Dance
Linlithgow - St Andrew's Dance - Neil Copland SDB - Linlithgow Scottish Country Dance Club

St Andrew's - Annual Ball - RSCDS St Andrew's Branch

Troon - Ian Muir and his band - RSCDS St Andrews Branch

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Cafe Highlights - Jack Kerouac, exploration and stuffed animals

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Clare English Clare English | 10:40 UK time, Friday, 25 November 2011

Ask anyone if they've read Jack Kerouac and they will invariably say yes, ON THE ROAD - written in 1957. This beatnik tale has been revered by groovy young things for decades; its like a badge of "cool", a right of passage. A forthcoming biopic on the writer looks set to send his profile soaring again. Now that's usually a cue for people to rush towards the back catalogue of work and this week's publication of a lost first Kerouac novel will undoubtedly fuel that fire. BUT, reader beware: if you expect to find something of the calibre of ON THE ROAD you might be let down. It's not exactly Kerouac's fault. He never intended anyone to see THE SEA IS MY BROTHER; in fact it was only found amongst some papers back in 1992 and may never have seen the light of day. However, it IS Kerouac's debut novel and fans and who knows, beatnik studies students?, will pounce on it eager to spot similarities to ON THE ROAD. THE SEA IS MY BROTHER is based on the writer's early days as a merchant seaman but the style and language are a shade green. My guest on this week's Book Café, writer and critic Stuart Evers, was a put off by the declamatory HE SAIDs SHE ASKEDs that pepper the pages. Clearly Kerouac had yet to find his groove.

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Choux Pastry and Kirsty Wark's Christmas Cake

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 13:00 UK time, Wednesday, 23 November 2011

Here are the latest recipes from The Kitchen Café, to be downloaded, kept and printed.

Download Fiona Burrell's choux pasty recipe

Download Kirsty Wark's Christmas cake recipe

The Kitchen Café is on BBC Radio Scotland, every Wednesday 1315-1400.


Calum MacCrimmon - When Birds Migrate

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 16:35 UK time, Tuesday, 22 November 2011

Canadian expat Calum finds the native Mi'kmaq tribes share a surprising commonality with the Scottish islanders who colonised Cape Breton, in music as well as a determination to survive the harsh winters.

Calum assembled an enviable cast of musicians for the piece. Calum himself on pipes and vocals is joined by Fraser Fifield on kaval and whistle, Iain Sandilands on vibes and percussion, John Mulhearn on chanter and vocals, Robbie Ward on guitar and fiddle, and James Lindsay on bass.

Listen to When Birds Migrate.

Vic Galloway - The Poets first Scottish session since 1965!

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 09:25 UK time, Tuesday, 22 November 2011

Vic Galloway had a very special session last night from 60s beat-pop group The Poets. They were discovered and signed by Rolling Stones manager Andrew Loog Oldham, had a UK hit with Now We're Thru in 1964 and released a string of singles throughout the decade.

Last night was their first session in Scotland since 1965!

The Poets playing in session on the Vic Galloway BBC Radio Scotland show.

You can hear the full session and interview by visiting the Vic Galloway pages on the website, however here's a wee taster - "I Love Her Still":


New Comedy - PTA

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 13:51 UK time, Monday, 21 November 2011

This week, our new radio comedy PTA comes to BBC Radio Scotland. The show's Producer, Margaret-Anne Docherty, tells us a little bit about episode one and explains where the idea for the show came from:


PTA is a four-part comedy, the first part broadcasts at 1405 on Tuesday 22 November 2011.

Cafe Highlights: Remembrance and Surrealism

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Clare English Clare English | 10:40 UK time, Monday, 21 November 2011

This week's edition of the Book Café came the day after Remembrance Sunday; a time for reflection, thinking about the sacrifices made by soldiers and civilians around the world. Most people's thoughts turn to Armistice Day, when the guns fell silent in the Great War of 1914-18. Even now in English classes throughout the land, the war poets are recited and studied, still powerful enough to pitch us back into the bloody battles that shaped modern Europe. It's also a good time to reach for the history books again. World War One has been comprehensively covered by a variety of eminent European writers and now we have Peter Englund's contribution too. It's a fresh perspective, showing us the bigger picture through the micro, the details.

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The Elusive Alexander Burnes - some mysteries from our programme 'Death in Kabul'!

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Louise Yeoman | 10:30 UK time, Monday, 21 November 2011

It began with a murder. November 2nd 1841: the grisly deaths of the Scottish explorer Sir Alexander Burnes and his younger brother Charlie: hacked to death in Kabul, and it ended with the massacre of an entire British army, wiped out in (what's now) Afghanistan in January 1842. Burnes' dedicated and loving family back home in Montrose were devastated by their loss. They were even more shocked when others tried to pin the catastrophe on their charming high-living celebrity son, and whispered that his love life was to blame. And then there was the will....

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Children in Need Special with Bryan Burnett and Catriona Shearer

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 20:00 UK time, Friday, 18 November 2011

During the first hour of tonight's Children in Need Special with Bryan Burnett and Catriona Shearer listeners were treated to live music from three of Scotland's top bands - the recently reformed Love and Money, The Bluebells and The Rezillos.

The Rezillos performing at the BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need Special

The Rezillos performing at the BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need Special

The Bluebells performing at the BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need Special.

The Bluebells performing at the BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need Special.

Love and Money performing at the BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need Special.

Love and Money performing at the BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need Special.

Visit the BBC Children in Need website to find out how to donate, or call 0345 7 33 22 33 (calls charged at standard geographic rates).

Children in Need - updated phone number

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 17:50 UK time, Friday, 18 November 2011

If you'd like to get in touch with BBC Children in Need with your donations, please use the official number 0345 7 33 22 33 from now or visit the Children in Need website to find out about other ways in which you can send your donations..

Many thanks for all the donations we've already received, and to hear about some of the organisations and people who have benefitted have a listen to Bryan Burnett's appeals.

Newsweek Scotland: Thinking aloud

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Derek Bateman Derek Bateman | 17:15 UK time, Friday, 18 November 2011

Ah, Quebec! I found it endlessly enjoyable and visually sumptuous during a week-long visit in 1995 just before the sovereignty referendum. The BBC asked me to make a couple of radio documentaries on the secession movement so I was in my element in a place that is a hotbed of political debate and ideas. I think the programmes may well have disappeared into the ether by now but for those among you with sleep problems, I enclose a link to a piece I wrote for the Edinburgh University Public Affairs magazine. Don't laugh...some people like this kind of thing.

Quebec is mentioned by someone on the Newsweek blog pointing out that the economy suffered in the run-up to the referendum, a point that has occasionally been made by opponents of Scotland's "secession", among them Malcolm Rifkind if I remember correctly. So we dip our toe into those (St Lawrence) waters tomorrow to see if that position still holds.

We have a political debate with Angus Macleod and Iain Macwhirter - who also made a documentary on Quebec. It's what I call Custard Pies. One minute Michael Moore is demanding answers from the SNP government about the costs of independence and complaining he gets no answer. Then at the Holyrood committee on the Scotland Bill he himself is unable to say how the financial provisions of the Bill will be implemented. (You see...he puts a pie in the Nats' face and they retaliate).

George Osborne says uncertainty over Scotland's constitutional future deters investment, but shouldn't investors also doubt the UK's developing arrangements with Brussels? David Cameron wants that to change into a looser association which might mean Britain in a second tier of the EU. Meanwhile a large chunk of his party including over 80 MPs, want a referendum on coming out altogether. Might THAT not also put off investors? Just thinking aloud...

Someone else thinking aloud quite a lot is Labour MP Douglas Alexander who seems to be on a tour of doom. He makes his second speech in a few weeks with his analysis of where Labour is going wrong. We'll ask him what they need to get right, and if they're capable of it.

We have horrifying stories about immigration - if you're worried about who might be illegally in our country, I suggest you turn the volume down when I speak to David Moss who studies the subject. We're in Spain for the elections and we look at the craft of letter-writing. It is an art that has been overtaken by bloggers writing drivel like this. Join me tomorrow at 8.

Looking forward to tonight's Children in Need Special

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 15:09 UK time, Friday, 18 November 2011

At 1810 tonight Bryan Burnett and Catriona Shearer take over the BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need reins and head to the Pacific Quay foyer for an hour of live music from some of Scotland top bands - Love and Money, The Bluebells and The Rezillos.

Pacific Quay is currently rocking (almost literally) with bands soundchecking. On the BBC Radio Scotland stage in the foyer Love and Money have just finished running through their set and are sounding brilliant.

James Grant of Love and Money during sound check for the BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need Special

Love and Money's James Grant during soundcheck for tonight's show.

Love and Money during the soundcheck for the BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need special.

Love and Money during the soundcheck for the BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need special.

And coming from the main "street" here is the sound of The Bluebells who are appearing on both our Children in Need Special and the Scottish Children in Need television show...

The Bluebells during their soundcheck for the BBC Scotland Children in Need Show 2011.

The Bluebells during their soundcheck for the BBC Scotland Children in Need Show 2011.

Take the Floor events guide w/c 18 Nov

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Simone Byrne Simone Byrne | 13:35 UK time, Friday, 18 November 2011

Scottish dancing, ceilidh and traditional music events in Scotland for the next seven days, brought to you by the Take the Floor team.

Robbie Shepherd

Robbie Shepherd 's Take the Floor Events Guide

FRIDAY 18TH NOVEMBER

Festival
Fiddle 2011 - Queen's Hall Edinburgh, The Scots Fiddle Festival - www.scotsfiddlefestival.com

Concert
Old Meldrum - British Legion Hall - Johnny Duncan - 8pm

Dance
Islesteps - Locharbriggs Community Centre - Dance with The Glencraig SDB


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CiN 2011 - MacAulay and Co

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 12:50 UK time, Friday, 18 November 2011

Here are a few photos from the MacAulay and Co, Children in Need Special.

MacAulay and Co Children in Need Special 2011

Fred MacAulay, Craig Hill, The Glee Club and Pudsey

Fred MacAulay after his makeover, Cat Cubie and River City's Tom Urie.

Fred MacAulay after his makeover, Cat Cubie and River City's Tom Urie.

The White Academy Glee Club

The White Academy Glee Club

Visit the BBC Children in Need website to find out how to donate, or call 0141 422 6111 between 0900-1800. Standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply (and calls may be included in your telecom provider's call package).

Bryan Burnett - CiN 2011

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 10:21 UK time, Friday, 18 November 2011

Here are Bryan's latest Children in Need appeal for the Edinburgh Women's Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre:


BBC Radio Scotland CiN Choir

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Dominic Jewel | 10:15 UK time, Friday, 18 November 2011

I'd just got back from a couple of days leave when my boss beckoned me over with a mischievous glint in her eye: "We've had an idea for Children in Need," she told me, "and we think it's just the thing for you to organise. Let's have a meeting."

With what noble task was I to be entrusted, I wondered? Or to put it another way, what difficult job needed doing? At the meeting, I was soon to find out.

"We'd like you to get together a choir of presenters and producers for BBC Radio Scotland's Children in Need night. You'll need to get them all together, organise a recording session, ask Jamie to teach them how to sing, find a song they can all manage, record it and make it into something we can broadcast on the night itself."

How long would I have in the studio with everyone to pull off this feat? "Oh, about an hour. Have fun! Next item on the agenda, one of the spots on Pudsey's bandage needs replacing...."

I'll skip the process of synchronizing the diaries of 20 presenters and producers to get them all in one room at the same time, and the surprising difficulty of finding a studio big enough to fit us all in, and jump to the moment when everyone began to arrive for the recording session. Would anyone be able to sing? Would they be too nervous? Would all these very individual people work as a team? Would Jamie tell rude jokes?

Picking up a top tip from a former music teacher, Inspire Participants With Sweeties, I had a large tin of them ready to welcome everyone in - and as the studio filled up and the sweet tin emptied, a wonderfully festive atmosphere emerged. When you think about it it's actually quite rare to get so many BBC Radio Scotland people all in one place at one time - we're all working at different hours on different programmes, and the sense of being united was palpable.

BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need Choir

In fact it's amazing how much energy people are prepared to put in for Children in Need. Nerves, busy broadcast schedules, other work commitments, all were put on one side for our hour in the studio- and this group of big individual personalities all knuckled down with Jamie, worked hard, and came up with something fantastic: a real, united voice of a community - the hallmark of all the best choirs.

So next time I'm asked to organise a BBC Radio Scotland choir, I'll jump at the chance! Just don't tell my boss yet- it might give her ideas....


Dominic Jewel is the Producer of BBC Radio Scotland's Classics Unwrapped.

Jackie Leven

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Tom Morton Tom Morton | 12:55 UK time, Thursday, 17 November 2011

The death of Jackie Leven on Monday left many listeners to the Tom Morton and Iain Anderson shows shocked and bereft. Many messages came in asking for tunes to be played, remembering the big man's antics, scams, good works, activism,stories and, most of all, music.

Jackie Leven

Jackie Leven: 1950-2011. Photograph copyright Pat Pope.

Michael Munro, weel-kent Glasgow author said this:

I was sad to hear that Jackie Leven has died. I first heard him on your show, when you played 'My Spanish Dad', and I promptly bought the album.

The man defied categorization, and he leaves a blander world behind him.

Japhrey Taylor said:

Had to pull over when I heard of the sad news of Levens death - I was gong to go and see him on Thursday night in Glasgow - he was a legend there will be no other like him - saw him live many times never failed to impress- been a fan since hearing Doll by Doll in the Eighties

On Sunday there's a chance to hear once more the Edi Stark interview with Jackie. It goes out at 1030.

BBC Alba - Children in Need choir

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 11:30 UK time, Thursday, 17 November 2011

Our colleagues in BBC Alba have filmed a children's choir recording the official BBC Children in Need song "Moving on Up", we loved it, and hope you will too...

Coming soon, we'll be unveiling the video of our BBC Radio Scotland choir performing their song in aid of Children in Need. Here they are in rehearsal.

Visit the BBC Children in Need website to find out how you can donate to this year's appeal.

BBC Radio Scotland - Children in Need 2011

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 10:20 UK time, Thursday, 17 November 2011

Tomorrow, Friday 18 November, is BBC Children in Need day throughout the UK. As always BBC Radio Scotland will be doing all it can to help raise money for the charity with a series of special programmes throughout the day and we'll be running around taking photographs to share with you here on the blog.

Phonelines at BBC Scotland open at 0900 on Friday however until that time you can donate via the BBC Children in Need donation page.

BBC Radio Scotland Children in Need schedule:

0850-1030: Call Kaye

Over 350 children's organisations across every area of the country benefit from grants from BBC Children In Need. Kaye would therefore like to know whether you work for one of these organisations or a friend/family member has benefited from their support.

Email the team now.

1030-1230: MacAulay and Co

Fred MacAulay and Susan Calman will be coming live from the foyer of BBC Scotland's Pacific Quay. Richard Cadey will reveal how much money he has raised from his bob-a-job duties this week and a host of celebrities and BBC Radio Scotland presenters will be answering the phones, taking pledges and finding out about the random things people are doing to raise money. Weather presenter Cat Cubie and actor Tom Urie will be telling Fred what they are doing for Children in Need and Fred will be receiving a designer make-over! And, if that's not enough, there's also be entertainment from the youngsters from White's Academy Glee Club.

1230-1300: Pudsey Pays Out

Bryan Burnett turns the spotlight on those who benefit from Children in Need.

1315-1400: The Comedy Cafe

Janice Forsyth looks at comedy for children and will be joined by special guest, "comedy-fizz bomb" Billy Kirkwood who performs comedy for kids and also regularly hosts The Stand's Kids Club events.

1405-1600: Tom Morton

Tom's guests on this special Children in Need Show include Frightened Rabbit who will be playing live throughout the show. 'Challenges' abound for Tom and guests including Paul English and we'll hear from local fundraisers and beneficiaries of Children in Need.

1810-2200: Children in Need Special

Bryan Burnett and Catriona Shearer present the annual Children in Need show as fundraisers pour through the doors to the BBC's headquarters in Glasgow. Live music comes from a classic Scottish pop line-up including Love and Money, The Bluebells and The Rezillos.

Bryan Burnett - CiN 2011 - CLIC Sargent, Transition Extreme

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Alan Braidwood Alan Braidwood | 19:05 UK time, Wednesday, 16 November 2011

In today's BBC Children in Need appeal, Bryan Burnett hears from CLIC Sargent and Transition Extreme.

Buttermilk scones and puff pastry recipes

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 13:00 UK time, Wednesday, 16 November 2011

Here are the latest recipes from The Kitchen Cafe, to be downloaded, kept and printed.

Download Fiona Burrell's puff pasty recipe

Download Michael Smith's buttermilk scones recipe

The Kitchen Cafe is on BBC Radio Scotland, every Wednesday 1315-1400.

Bryan Burnett - CiN 2011 - St Andrews Family Support Project

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 19:05 UK time, Tuesday, 15 November 2011

In today's BBC Children in Need appeal, Bryan Burnett visits the St Andrews Family Support Project in Dundee which supports young parents and their children.


Bryan Burnett - Children in Need 2011 - Tourette Syndrome

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 19:05 UK time, Monday, 14 November 2011

In the first of his BBC Children in Need appeals, Bryan Burnett visits a family where both the children have been diagnosed with tourette syndrome.

The children describe their symptoms and how they deal with them while their mother tells Bryan how Tourette Scotland has helped.

Take the Floor events guide w/c 11 Nov

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 17:04 UK time, Friday, 11 November 2011

FRIDAY 11TH NOVEMBER

CONCERT
Paisley - Paisley Town Hall - Fundraising concert with the Alexander Brothers, Heedrum Hodrum and The Graham Laurie Paisley Accordion Orchestras

Portree - Aros Theatre - Fred Morrison


SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING
Edinburgh - Lauriston Hall - Ken's Ceilidh - 8pm

Old Kilpatrick - Napier Hall - Clydebank and District Highland Association Ceilidh - 7.30pm


SATURDAY 12th NOVEMBER

ACCORDION AND FIDDLE CLUBS
Uist and Benbecula - Church of Scotland Hall, Benbecula - Ceilidh Night


CONCERT
Inverness - Bogbain Farm - Fred Morrison

Milnagavie - Charles Theatre - Rachael Hair Trio - 7.45pm


CLASS
Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Wellgate Library - Harp - 2pm


FIDDLE FESTIVAL
Kirriemuir - St Andrews Church - Scotland's best young Fiddlers


SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING
Selkirk - Midlem Hall - Fundraising Ceilidh featuring Riddell Fiddles

Elderslie - Elderslie Village Hall - Cameron MacKichan

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Newsweek Scotland: Tak Sa Mycket

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Derek Bateman Derek Bateman | 16:15 UK time, Friday, 11 November 2011

I'm beginning to worry about the independence referendum - Whenever That Is. There was yet another report put out his week - from the House of Commons Library - which had goggle-eyed constitution-watchers frothing at the mouth...(excuse me while I reach for the Kleenex).

Worried because there's going to be so much information washing around possibly years before anything actually happens, we might run out of things to say. (Note how I'm not interested in our country's future, but how to fill Newsweek every Saturday). As usual there was what you might call a bit of over-writing and over-reaction in the press - one billed it as a backlash against the separatists, rather giving away its agenda I suspect.

Nevertheless I took the trouble to read the actual report and, having researched enough on the subject lately to merit an honorary degree - are you reading this, Oxford University? I found it one of the most balanced and comprehensive of its type. I know there are many critics of Westminster out there but to be fair to the Commons Library researchers, they have earned a reputation for integrity over many years. Yet what struck me was how many caveats there are in everything that is written.

Every area is hedged around with What If? And several times there are references to the possibility of both the (theoretical) new Scotland and the remaining UK being successor states in continuing membership of the EU. That may sound unlikely and against the majority of evidence we have seen so far, but the researchers point out that if there is goodwill between Edinburgh and London and the break-up of the UK is portrayed as amicable and voluntary then it is difficult for any third party like the UN or EU to disagree.

Would London back Scotland's continued status? Well, why not if the Scots had already expressed that view. After all we are told there is a respect agenda and that one of the Union's great strengths is the mutual respect and strong bond between us. Surely a London government wouldn't want Scotland to fail? On the other hand...this is politics.

Anyway one newspaper led on Scotland's possible contribution to funds to shore up the Euro...IF Scotland joined the Euro...IF there is still a Euro... We decided to take up this point with one of our leading experts from Edinburgh University. Will Scotland be forced into the Euro? Only 17 out of 27 members are in.

I particularly like the Swedish excuse for not adopting the Euro which is supposed to be mandatory...unless like Britain and Denmark you negotiate an opt-out. Before going into the Euro you must first join the European Exchange Rate Mechanism and joining the ERM is VOLUNTARY. So Sweden said we won't bother with the ERM, tak sa mycket (thanks very much).

We'll bring you the interesting piece about Italian society that went AWOL two weeks ago and we discuss launching a pre-emptive attack on Iran (No, not the Newsweek team - the US) and we're on Mars...nearly. Angus Macleod will guide us through the papers. I'm off to read yet another report saying that it is illegal to ask the Scots what they think about the future of their country!!? Have we all gone mad? Join me at 8 to find out.

MacAulay and Co. Weekend Events Guide: 11 November 2011

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Simone Byrne Simone Byrne | 16:11 UK time, Friday, 11 November 2011

Here's the MacAulay and Co. What's on guide, offering a range of events taking place in Scotland over the weekend...Certainly worth a listen if you're stuck for something to do.

I've also added a wee 10 second clip filmed earlier in the week, that offers a snapshot of an average day in the MacAulay and Co. office. It has been filmed to highlight the BBC2 project Britain in a Day which is looking for you to pick up a camera on Saturday 12 November, and film your day. Find out more and get involved.

What's On Guide



MacAulay and Co: Office Clip

Listen to MacAulay and Co. Monday to Friday 1030-1200 on BBC Radio Scotland.


Tom's Top Tale: Wonky Cars & Wobbly Dads

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Tom Morton Tom Morton | 15:00 UK time, Friday, 11 November 2011

Cars that just wouldn't start - that was our theme on Wednesday. Provoking Chris to remember this:

car keys

Years ago, leaving a family 'do' with my folks, Mum was driving, Dad was a bit wobbly. The car would not start so they phone the Recovery guys. My Dad, being the bloke, decided he would deal with the chap when he arrived. I will never forget the look on the mechanics face as my dad, swaying ever so slighly but ever so noticably, explained to him "yesh, the problem ish... my car.. it won't stop.... eh, start." We were all sorted out when my mum, sober and slightly embarrassed came down the drive to explain that it was ok, she was driving.

Remembrance Sunday with Cathy Macdonald

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Cathy MacDonald Cathy MacDonald | 12:56 UK time, Friday, 11 November 2011

This Remembrance Sunday on Sunday Morning, with me, Cathy Macdonald, my guest for the whole of the first hour is a woman, who, until her retirement earlier this year, was at the reins of the Church of Scotland Guild.

Alison Twaddle spent over a decade within the Church of Scotland, doing everything possible to help the marginalized and disenfranchised members of our society. Then two years ago, she got some unexpected news about her health - it was to change her life. It's a fascinating story and one you won't want to miss.

Naturally on this special Sunday in November we honour and remember those who died in battle , but we'll also be hearing how important it is to remember those who've suffered life changing injuries, in more recent conflicts like Iraq and Afghanistan. Bob Dickson talks with with Sergeant Gary Jamieson who lost both legs and an arm in Afghanistan, you can hear part of the interview below and the full interview can be heard on Sunday's show.


And celebrating BBC Radio Scotland's Education Season, there's news of a project in one of Edinburgh's Primary Schools which supports parents in raising children with confidence helping them to do the best they can for their children during those important early, formative years.

And we'll be taking a look at BBC2's award winning comedy "Rev", which is back for a second series.

All that, plus a great mix of music, and all you have to do is sit back and enjoy it.

Get in touch by e-mail on sundaymorningwith@bbc.co.uk

You wait for one then they all start coming

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Ricky Ross Ricky Ross | 10:10 UK time, Friday, 11 November 2011

Well it feels like that to us. It had been trundling along nicely here at the AC. We had some guests and occasionally we decided we'd rather just play some records we loved. Then suddenly, as if from nowhere we received news that three of the biggest names in our kind of 'country' were to be visiting us within a couple of weeks of each other. We will broadcast the half hour chat I had with Alison Krauss in her dressing room very soon and Steve Earle's interview and live gig will be our pre-Christmas treat on the 16th of December. Meanwhile you can catch what happened when Ryan Adams came to Glasgow recently on tomorrow night's show.

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MacAulay and Co: Fractious Fractures

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Simone Byrne Simone Byrne | 14:44 UK time, Thursday, 10 November 2011

Fred and Karen were asking listeners about fractures or broken bones they'd had over the years. Read some of the texts sent in to the team below and listen to a clip of the show as Fred finds out how best to cope with a broken bone ...


From JD
During a game of rugby last season I managed to break my cheek and eye socket, along with fracturing my eyebrow in 3 places! Result was a metal plate 4 screws and a blue yellow and green face for 6 weeks. I'm still playing and apart from some loss of feeling in my face I'm ok.

From Richard
When I was nine I fell out a tree and suffered a compound fracture of the femur. When I came round i could see bone sticking out. Spent two months in hospital.

Sandy in Kilmarnock
I broke my femur playing football aged nine. I went on to compete in Olympic weightlifting with no problems.

No name given
Nothing broken or fractured, but brother nearly served tongue playing goalie in football when he went down for a ball and the other team's striker tried to kick the ball missing it and kicking my brothers chin forcing his mouth to close and biting his own tongue. Went to A&E who said best to just leave it as it would heal on its own as it's the fastest healing part of your body.

Lesley, West Lothian
Broke my wrist on Christmas Day 2007 after slipping on ice. Missed my dinner and ruined everyone else's! Had 2 ops and had 2 wear a frame for 6wks. On the plus side was in and out of A&E in an hour! 5pm on Christmas day is the time to go!

Dave
I broke my collar bone when rolling my Easter egg. I was nine.

David
I was grass skiing at Hillend jumped over a couple of gorse bushes landed on my shoulder when I looked at it, my collarbone was broken and sticking out agony.

Dr Pete
Morning guys, I had my skull fractured, my arm snapped in half between the elbow and wrist, two herniated disks and broken ribs 13 years ago when I was hit by a truck doing 55 miles an hour whilst I was on my bike on my way home from work. Apart from the instant pain, I felt very little until later due to shock. The driver didn't see me and I still suffer from issues related to it to this day. The moral of the story: if you are on two wheels in South Florida, ride like you are invisible because drivers don't see you :)

Graeme in Neilston
Broke my index finger , fractured skull , fractured shoulder blade after being knocked down by car when i was 8 helping pal across road , i went back for his tonka truck and on way back for it got hit with car...

Paul the postie, from Glasgow
I fell through a roof while fitting ventilation, fell 50 feet, broke my pelvis, chipped my spine in 4 places and landed between two vat's of boiling water. Lucky boy!

Jon Smith, Montrose
Fractured ankle when best friend landed on my left foot while having student piggy back fight on the West Sands at St Andrews.

Ali in Edinburgh
I broke my wrist and broke my shoulder on opposite sides racing motorcycles just as my wife went on maternity leave, she was not happy!!!!

Rob in Abernethy
Hi Fred dislocated my shoulder in a climbing fall. Was not diagnosed for 5 weeks and suffered badly for 3 years. That was 20 years ago and still flares up...But still climbing.

Judith in Gartmore
I broke my ankle Telemark skiing, it was just at Lake Louise in Canada. I was in denial and carried on skiing, was fine until I tried to turn! Had a fab ride off the mountain in a sledge stretcher & the following week went dog sledding with stookie on! The first thing they asked for at the hospital was my credit card :)

Cafe highlights: dancing the tango and yoof speak

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Clare English Clare English | 14:24 UK time, Thursday, 10 November 2011

It's fair to say I am not a morning person. Even by 10 am I am rarely "raring to go". It takes masses of tea and a lot of effort to push me out of the house early. Yet this is what I found myself doing one Monday morning as I left the house for an earlyish Book Cafe assignment. Destination, Edinburgh. Or was it Buenos Aires? That seemed more appropriate for the task in hand: I was going to take a few tentative tango steps with top dancer turned author, Kapka Kassabova.

Clare English learning to Tango

Clare learning to tango

Edinburgh's rather cheerless Tun building might have been a poor subsistute for an Argentine club but even under the glare of the strip lights, the mood subtly changed as I sat down on the couch next to Kapka to begin talking about her book,TWELVE MINUTES OF LOVE - A TANGO STORY. The prose is spell binding, sweeping you along as if you're already on the dance floor. We learn through her ten years of experience that this most melancholic and expressive of dance forms is really all about your "troubles". Easy to see then how it could take over your life, as it did for Kapka, determining who she loved and where she lived. But, after a decade, she'd felt she'd been, er, tangoed! It's rare to find Kapka on the dancefloor these days and the reasons are many and complex. (ie read the book!)


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Shereen: Assessing the news

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Shereen Nanjiani Shereen Nanjiani | 12:40 UK time, Thursday, 10 November 2011

This week's panellists are journalist Jane Graham, PR Executive Martin Raymond, and STV's digital editor Robert Dawson Scott - always an opinionated lot.
On Remembrance Sunday, a hot topic for discussion is the row over FIFA's (now overturned) decision to ban the England team from wearing poppies this weekend. It's prompted a wider debate about whether the whole poppy wearing thing has got out of hand. Is it still about remembering those who have fallen or is it being used as a means of glorifying war in the light of the current conflicts? If newsreaders have to wear poppies on air then why not AIDS or breast cancer ribbons? Where should it stop? I'll be asking my guests if they've been wearing a poppy.

We'll also be taking a look at the final downfall of Silvio Berlusconi - it wasn't the girls wot dunnit but the economy, stupid!

And we'll be assessing News International's James Murdoch's performance at the Commons Select Committee following the latest allegations of surveillance of royals, politicians, and lawyers.

This week's special guest is the recently appointed Chairman of CBI Scotland, Nosheena Mobarik. Nosheena is not only an accomplished, award winning business woman. She has many more strings to her bow. She tells me about her love of art and her charity work which led to a harrowing visit to Bosnia. You can hear a longer version of the interview here.


And remember, if there's anything you think we should be talking about on the show this Sunday, then let me know.

Shortcrust pastry and scotch egg recipes

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 13:00 UK time, Wednesday, 9 November 2011

Here are the latest recipes from The Kitchen Cafe, to be downloaded, kept and printed. You might recognise them from a previous programme, but if not, here's a chance to try them out.

Download Fiona Burrell's shortcrust pasty recipe

Download Tony Singh's scotch egg recipe

The Kitchen Cafe is on BBC Radio Scotland, every Wednesday 1315-1400.

The cost of university

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 15:54 UK time, Monday, 7 November 2011

On Wednesday at 2pm on BBC Radio Scotland, sixth year student Robin Drummond is continuing to question Is A Degree Worth the Paper It's Written On? Alasdair Drennan is a third year history student at Edinburgh University who Robin asks about how much it costs to be a student. Here Alasdair expands on his thoughts on the cost of his degree.

Alasdair Drennan

University is always going to be an expensive undertaking. A four year degree at Edinburgh will still cost me in excess of £24,000 in spite of the fact that the Scottish Government pays for my tuition. The cost of rent, bills, books, food and the occasional night out all mounts up. Rent in Edinburgh for students is one of the highest in the country. Working during summer does not go very far to make up these costs and at the end of my degree I will owe both the government and my parents a great deal. The concept of paying tuition on top of the existing costs is frightening.

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Sunday Morning with Cathy Macdonald 6 Nov

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Cathy MacDonald Cathy MacDonald | 15:46 UK time, Saturday, 5 November 2011

This week on Sunday Morning With, my guest is the wonderfully effervescent, Anne Ellis - art historian and broadcaster, who amongst many other things, will be talking about a special project that she's going to be involved in with us here on the programme - indeed it's one we'd like you to be involved in too. Anne will reporting for Sunday Morning With, on objects of spritual significance, so your suggestions of pieces of art, sculpture, paintings - even a spiritual site, do get in touch and let us know.

Over the last few weeks we've followed the stories surrounding the anti-capitalist protesters at St Pauls - and of course there are similar camps all around the world. We're taking a Scottish slant on that subject and discussing the issues arising from the demonstrations, while asking whether they actually offer any real solutions.

This week the Alliance of Religions and Conservation launched their Sacred Land initiative in Assisi in Italy - it's the world's first global commitment to green pilgrimage - we'll be finding out more.

The message about drugs is always a challenging one for parents and health professionals - we'll be hearing about a powerful new play in Dunfermline's Carnegie Hall, this Wednesday and Thursday, which aims to tackle that very subject.

And Tommy Whitelaw will be talking about a rather different tour he's just completed - gathering stories from carers, about living with dementia. And that's not where the story ends, because later this week, he'll be presenting those, very poignant, stories and letters to Health Secretary Nicola Sturgeon in Parliament.

Just some of this weeks moral and ethical debates and a great mix of music, that's
Sunday Morning with me, Cathy Macdonald, here on BBC Radio Scotland at 0700 every Sunday.

Take The Floor events guide w/c 4th November

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Alan Braidwood Alan Braidwood | 16:55 UK time, Friday, 4 November 2011

Here's the latest Take The Floor events guide.


SATURDAY 5th NOVEMBER
CLASS
Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Wellgate Library - Harp - 2pm


SUNDAY 6th NOVEMBER
ACCORDION AND FIDDLE CLUBS
Arbroath - Artisan Golf Club - Neil Dawson Dance Band

Gretna - Athletic and Social Club - Guest TBC

Lauder - Black Bull Hotel - Steven Todd


MONDAY 7th NOVEMBER
ACCORDION AND FIDDLE CLUBS
Thurso - Pentland Hotel - Elizabeth MacKenzie Band

CLASS
St Andrews, SCD Club - live music from Dierdre Adamson on Accordion (learners welcome) - 7:30pm

FOLK CLUB
Glenfarg - The Glenfarg Hotel - Steve Tilston

TUESDAY 8th NOVEMBER
CLASS
Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Central Library - Scots Song - suitable for beginners - 2pm

ACCORDION AND FIDDLE CLUBS
Blairgowrie - Red House Hotel - Hebbie Gray

Dunfermline - Civil Sports Association, Rosyth

Renfrew - Moorpark Masonic Halls - Gary Sutherland Trio

Thornhill - Thornhill Bowling Club - Alex McIntyre

WEDNESDAY 9th NOVEMBER
ACCORDION AND FIDDLE CLUBS
Forres - Victoria Hotel - Craig Paton Trio

Inveraray - Argyll Hotel - Wayne Robertson Duo

Langholm - British Legion - Andrew Gibb

CLASS
Fife - Kenoway Community School - Accordion Class - George Lawrie - 7-9pm - *Tickets £5.60/half price first lesson*

Midlem - Village Hall - Live Music - Old Time Class (GB Scott) - 8-10pm - *Tickets £2*

Dumfries - Stakeford and Summerville Community Centre - RSDCS Beginners Class


THURSDAY 10th NOVEMBER
ACCORDION AND FIDDLE CLUBS
Windygates - Greig Institute - Ian MacCullum Trio

Selkirk - Selkirk Cricket Club - Riddell Fiddles

Shetland - Shetland Hotel, Lerwick - AGM and Local Night

West Barns - West Barns Inn, Dunbar - Matthew MacLennan

CLASS
Penicuik- Town Hall - Ceilidh Class - 8-9:30pm - *Tickets £2.90/£1.50*

Eassie - Eassie Hall - Social/Old Time/Ceilidh Class - 7.30pm

Dundee - Wighton Heritage Centre, Central Library, Dundee - Beginner Fiddle Class - 4pm

Dundee - Wighton Heritage Centre, Central Library, Dundee - Beginner chanter Class - 5pm

Dundee - Wighton Heritage Centre, Central Library, Dundee - Beginner Guitar Class - 6pm


MacAulay and Co. Weekend Events Guide: 4 November 2011

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Simone Byrne Simone Byrne | 16:40 UK time, Friday, 4 November 2011

If you're stuck for things to do this weekend then listen to a clip of this week's MacAulay and Co. what's on guide...

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Cafe Highlights w/c 31 Oct

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Clare English Clare English | 15:20 UK time, Friday, 4 November 2011

The beauty of live broadcast is that things will change as you speak... or even before that. Monday's Book Café was a case in point. We'd fixed up Jeanette Winterson as our first guest, to talk about her new book Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?, the true story behind her debut novel, Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit. The second tranche of memoirs was terrific fun to read albeit with dashes of sadness, so I was really looking forward to Jeanette giving the show a good kick start.

Ten minutes before we went live, my producer Serena looked ashen faced; Jeanette hadn't shown up at the appointed studio, and she should have done, as a taxi had been booked to take her there. Was she stuck in traffic, kidnapped perhaps? The minutes whizzed by (they always do as transmission time looms!) and with two minutes to go, still no Jeanette but at least we had an explanation. She'd walked to the studios, (saving the BBC money for the cab, bless her!) and had gone to the wrong place. Cue frantic re-jigging of scripts and Serena pacing the cubicle, scratching her head as she hatched PLAN B. We could do the interview on the phone? Always a downer as the line quality varies. Or maybe... it was a long shot but Jeanette might just be able to access the only little studio still in operation where she was. A decision was made; we would start off with our Horror/ Hallowe'en item. Thankfully BBC Merseyside had put our guest Ramsey Campbell in place in good time and he rose to the occasion - cool as a cucumber.

To be honest, no one would have been any the wiser of our last minute changes if I hadn't blabbed to you now. In the end, Jeanette made it in time for third place on the running order. That kind of chaos reminds me of my days working in news, where most plans went up in smoke at some point during the broadcast. In a perverse way, I actually relish the chaos and an eerie calm descends on me. Lucky my producer and engineer share similar dispositions. The point is, broadcasting is neither rocket science nor brain surgery but you DO have to speak when the green microphone light flashes. Instantaneous decisions have to be made, even if they prove to be wrong in the end. Freezing is not an option unless you like the tumbleweed sound of " dead air".


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Newsweek Scotland: An active debate

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Derek Bateman Derek Bateman | 14:50 UK time, Friday, 4 November 2011

Our coverage of the constitutional future in (or out) of Europe last week caused a bit of a flutter. We discovered that there's a whole community of people out there in continental Europe not only interested in Scotland's future but actively debating what might happen to oor wee midden...(presumably now growing herbs and garlic alongside the kale).

We've been in contact with an academic in Nijmegan - although he was interviewed from Antwerp - and one in Vienna who are both taking a close interest. They have good news and bad news for Alex Salmond - so I suppose that's also the case for David Cameron only in reverse, if you see what I mean. While one thinks the UK would be the successor state after independence and that Scotland would require to talk its way into the EU, there would be no obstacle with that, and the other thinks both the UK and Scotland are likely to be in the same equal position...outside the EU and negotiating access. Both experts agree that come what may both Scotland and the UK would become member states because there is a force majeur at work in the Union which trumps all European and international law.

By the way, didn't it sound strange to hear a British Prime Minister seeming to endorse a report by Citigroup advising global renewable companies to think twice before investing in Scotland? David Cameron clearly linked that to the referendum and that is what the report said. But it also told firms it was too risky to invest in Scotland NOW.

(Note to PM: We are not independent yet and you remain the Prime Minister of the whole UK. Might be a good idea when you speak on investment to urge firms to continue doing so... Unless you're conceding defeat to Mr Salmond of Edinburgh).

Mr Cameron was also busy glad-handing in Cannes where, gratifyingly, it rained. It rained, or something similar to rain, on the Greek bail-out too. We'll try to disentangle. We bring you Danish pensions which are some of the best in the world (75% of salary!) as a state-backed provider launches in Britain to take on our own top-up company. There'll be something on the new Tory leader - unannounced at time of writing but my money's on Murdo by a whisker - and Angus Macleod will make even the dullest morning blatts sound entertaining. Join me at 8.

Shereen: Tales of a Baltimore cop

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Shereen Nanjiani Shereen Nanjiani | 14:30 UK time, Friday, 4 November 2011

On this week's show I'll be talking to a Baltimore cop who'll be telling me just how true to life the TV series "The Wire" really is. Kelvin Sewell spent twenty two years in the Baltimore Police Department working on some of the city's most notorious homicide cases. He has some pretty horrific stories to tell and has his own theories as to why people kill. I'll also ask him about what goes on in the "box"- the interview room made famous in "The Wire" where witnesses and suspects are questioned. Kelvin says what really happens is quite different and gives an insight into why we kill. Fascinating stuff.


Kelvin Sewell

Kelvin Sewell

My studio guests this Sunday will be writer and journalist Kirsty Scott, Politics Professor Sarah Oates, and Daily Record Political Editor, Magnus Gardham.
Getting them going this week will be the mess that is the Eurozone. Sarah already emailed me about the proposed Greek Euro referendum: "Isn't that like asking your teenager if they WANT to tidy their room?" Of course this story has changed about ten times since then and it's still developing so hopefully by Sunday we can pick over the big picture and try and work out what it all means for us.

I'm glad Sarah's with us this week. As an American, her take on the Republican's latest possible Presidential candidate will be interesting. Herman Cain's been in the news after being accused of sexual harassment. He's quite a character- the first politician I've seen singing at his press conference. We'll have his rendition of "Imagine" on the show. Not to be missed.

We'll also be talking about all the other big talking points of the week. If there's something you think we should look at, let me know.

Grow your hair kids

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Ricky Ross Ricky Ross | 11:25 UK time, Friday, 4 November 2011

I don't know where to start but I'll have a go:

Occasionally people (and it seems to me that this seems to be happening in a lovely way across the pond) seem to find it easier to cut themselves off and make gloriously isolated music. Over the last few years we've loved Bon Iver, Grizzly Bear and our old friends Richmond Fontaine who have all wallowed in their own sacred space. Their playgrounds were scattered throughout the northern states. So let's add a new destination: Stillwater, Oklahoma. Home to this interesting collective:

Ricky Ross with Other Lives for BBC Radio Scotland's Another Country

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Tom's Top Tales: A fishy story

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Tom Morton Tom Morton | 15:45 UK time, Wednesday, 2 November 2011

Eating stuff you already know is 'off'. Some mentionable, some unmentionable things were sent in to the Tom Morton Show on Tuesday. This arrived just after a discussion with the redoubtable Vic Galloway about his trip to Iceland. Where he did not eat shark:

Image courtesy: Chris 73 / Wikimedia Commons

Hakarl - Fermented Shark

Good morning Tom from Sunny South Florida.

Two years ago after the Reykjavik marathon, I tried some Hakarl, a fermented shark dish which is buried for 3 months in the ground, followed by a further 3 months hanging in some guy's garden shed. It had an interesting texture but the taste is still with me today. Twas a bit like eating tripe which had been marinated in the urinal of The Pig and Whistle for four or five days. When the recommended side dish is Breniven, a kind of industrial alcohol in a fancy bottle, one should have been more aware I guess

Regards

Jack O'Farrell

Mary Contini's Tiramisu

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 13:00 UK time, Wednesday, 2 November 2011

Here's the latest recipe from The Kitchen Cafe, by chef Mary Contini, to be downloaded, kept and printed.

Download the recipe.

The Kitchen Cafe is on BBC Radio Scotland every Wednesday, 1315-1400.

Pocket Legends: Oscar Peterson and Joe Harriott

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 08:25 UK time, Tuesday, 1 November 2011

We've added two more Pocket Legends to The Jazz House archive - pianist Oscar Peterson and alto saxophonist Joe Harriott:

Oscar Peterson




Joe Harriott

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