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Walking Through Landscape

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Karen Miller Karen Miller | 12:52 UK time, Friday, 22 October 2010

Monise Durrani, the producer of the new BBC Radio Scotland series Walking Through Landscape tells us a little more about the series:

Walking Through Landscape, a new BBC Radio Scotland series that's part of BBC Scotland's "Making Scotland's Landscape" season, starts on Monday at 1130.

In these programmes, presenter Iain Stewart (as you might guess from the title) takes a walk through some of Scotland's most intriguing landscapes, with people who live and work in them as guides, uncovering tales of how we have shaped the land around us.

Professor Iain Stewart

Professor Iain Stewart

A series like this is always great to work on - there's nothing quite like having your eyes opened by people who know and love a place. For the first programme we braved rain, midges and ferry timetables to visit Sunart Oakwoods, near Strontian in Argyll. I'd visited the woods before as a tourist, and they're lovely - really lush and peaceful. So I knew they were full of butterflies and birdsong, but I had no idea of their history.

Trees%20in%20Ariundle%20Oakwood

Trees%20in%20Ariundle%20Oakwood

It turns out that this area, known today as a nature reserve, owes existence entirely to industry, because the oak trees were valued as a source of charcoal in the 18th century. And with the help of enthusiastic locals Jim Kirby and John Dye, we were able to see the legacy of that time for ourselves - with the archaeological remains buildings and charcoal platforms, and places where you can see how the trees were planted in straight lines - the woods' history is literally there to trip over, but without the locals' help, we'd have probably walked straight past it! You can see more photographs from the Ariundle Oakwoods in our gallery and the walk will be available to download as a podcast.

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