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24/7 Zone

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Elizabeth Clark | 13:00 UK time, Sunday, 31 October 2010

I've been thinking about the significance of the number 7. Lots of people consider it a lucky number. You've got the 7 Wonders of the World, Snow White and her Seven Dwarfs, the 7 Deadly Sins, The Magnificent Seven and of course the number of days (and nights) in the week. And that's why I've been giving it some thought. For over 2 years now, we've been broadcasting 5 Zones a week, overnight on BBC Radio Scotland's Medium Wave frequency.

This week, we're making a momentous leap and broadcasting across 7 nights as well as shifting over to the FM frequency which means that for the first time in our history, we'll be a 24/7 FM station. I'm not going to bore you with the many reasons behind why we're doing this. All you need to know is that it means you get the chance to hear even more brilliant programmes from our vast and ever expanding archive. And don't worry, you don't have to actually stay awake between the hours of half past midnight and 6am to hear our Zones. They're available for you listen to online via the BBC Radio Scotland website, either as a continuous stream, or by choosing individual chapters of the Zone via the BBC iPlayer.

To coincide with our hijacking of the overnight schedule, our friends at Get It On have taken contributor madmacfraeclydebank up on his suggestion to give next week over to Zones-themed programmes. Tune into Bryan every week night after the 6 o'clock news.

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 2.


    You mean I'll have to listen to Dotun Adebayo on MW?














    Jeezo...

  • Comment number 3.

    Yet more changes!Where will it all end - is this yet another money saving device not to have to pay R5 for carrying up all night?+30 minutes chopped off Tom Morton in the pm(to accommodate feature material from 11.30 so Kaye Adams can blether for another 30 minutes)+60 minutes of news gone at midday to let John Beattie prattle on some more(how many journalist's jobs paid for his salary).

  • Comment number 4.

    I have to back up nurse bill. I have yet to hear of anyone who thinks call kaye is even close to being good, why John beattie? His sports hour is is not exactly essential listening so why give him a prime spot? And cutting down on one of the best shows on radio scotland beggars beleif....


    Great theme idea by madmac though...

  • Comment number 5.

    "I'm not going to bore you with the many reasons why we're doing this"

    With great respect, I need to know why

    This reduces the available programme choice of many (most?) listeners in Scotland to whom radio 5 overnight is otherwise unobtainable

    So, please bore us with the reasons

  • Comment number 6.

    So what precisely do you need to do to have your say around here .. my comment, posted a couple of days ago, seems to have vanished into the BBC-controlled ether.

    Perhaps I should have omitted the bit about BBC high-heid-yins being downright smug in their disinclination to issue a full account of their decision to pull Radio Fivelive from the overnight FM frequency & replace it with 5 hours of repeated programming - (doubtless a five hour reel to reel tape with the nightwatchman left to keep an eye on it)

    Yours aye,

    Bothychiel

  • Comment number 7.

    I've tried to give this new night time format a fair chance, but it fails. I've heard that same stuff more than once.
    Why was this change made?

  • Comment number 8.

    Just listened to BBC Scotland's overnight offering - all repeated programmes but worth listening to again although I have no doubt we shall hear them all again within the week.

    My only criticism lies in the continuity announcer - Ian Stewart's (?) manner of presentation was as bad as an extremely irritating new wave performance poet, where on earth did the BBC find this vocal pest?

    Bothychiel.

 

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