BBC BLOGS - Viewfinder

Archives for July 2010

Your pictures of the week: Drive

Phil Coomes | 11:18 UK time, Thursday, 29 July 2010

Comments

Photo by Nijs Martine

Each week, we set a theme and ask you to send in your photographs; this time the theme was drive.

Why not take a look and let me know what your favourite is by using the comment box below.

You can see the pictures I have selected here.

Your picturesMany thanks for those of you who sent in your pictures. If your shot didn't make this week's selection, why not send us something for next week?

The new theme is Dry.

Interpret this in any way you see fit and send your pictures to us at yourpics@bbc.co.uk or upload them directly from your computer.

Please include the word "Dry" in the subject line of your message.

The deadline is midnight BST Tuesday 3 August 2010, and remember to add your name and a caption: who, what, where and when should be enough, though the more details you give, the better your chance of being selected.

We will publish a selection of your photos this time next week.

If you want to plan ahead, you can see a list of the upcoming themes here.

Files should be sent as JPEGs. They shouldn't be larger than 10Mb and ideally much smaller: around 1Mb is fine, or you can resize your pictures to 1,000 pixels across.

Please see our terms and conditions, but remember that the copyright remains with you. The pictures will only be used by the BBC for the purposes of this project. Finally, when taking photos, please do not endanger yourself or others, take unnecessary risks or infringe any laws.

In conversation with James Dodd

Phil Coomes | 12:16 UK time, Monday, 26 July 2010

Comments

Olympic Swimmers by James Dodd

The photographic business is a crowded one: for those who want to make their mark, it can take time to figure out the right path to follow. This involves developing your own style; it can also mean working your way through a number of ideas before your goal becomes clear.

James Dodd, 26, has been doing just that, working on personal projects alongside commissions and student assignments. It's certainly paid off as he was one of the finalists in this year's Burn Emerging Photographers Fund.

James has also found time to set up an agency and shoot weddings and he is now running photographic workshops and exhibitions.

Browsing through James's work, I was taken by the variety - from the dark brooding pictures of Olympic swimmers to the fly-on-the-wall-style pictures of car boot fairs.

James obviously has a passion for photography and plenty of talent too, so I pitched a few questions to him.

So, James: tell me something about your background. What drove you to a spot behind the lens?

Photo by James Dodd

"I've always had a passion for understanding how things work which led me to study computing at Sheffield Hallam University. Photography was initially just a way to express myself and contain the growing level of boredom with the mundane rituals of office work. I no longer view my attraction to the medium in this way.
 
"As a system developer, I was always looking for formulas and patterns to re-use throughout projects. I think I only became bored once I discovered logic to approach the them. With photography, I can't do this. I can't copy and paste something; I can't re-use set variables. And I think this is what keeps my drive.
 
"Magnum photographer Alec Soth probably said this better than I ever could:
 
"'Knowing it's not a formula, I know that I have to keep shaking these up, so I do something fast, then do something that takes years, trying different things. Do the stuff where I work alone, do the stuff where I work collaboratively. Sometimes it will fall flat, but hopefully magic will strike at some point.' [Alec Soth - Interviewed by Big Red & Shiny]"

You completed the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) accredited course for press photographers: how did that help you develop your style and direction?

Photo by James Dodd

"I came to photojournalism after a friend of a friend introduced me to all the usual photojournalism headliners: Capa, Nachtwey, Cartier-Bresson, McCullin and so on.
 
"To say that I was inspired would be an understatement. It wasn't just the photography, but more their dedication to the cause. This is what led me to the NCTJ course.
 
"It helped me to quickly understand the press industry: how things worked; some ways of working and photojournalism ethics; the law and my rights as a photographer. It also put me in a room with like-minded individuals - some of whom I'm still regularly in touch with, especially those who co-founded Statement Images with me.
 
"I'm still not sure whether the course was the right route for me, though. I understand that the actions from my studies no doubt led me to where I am now. But I feel that where I am now isn't the direction I intended to take, and it's a direction that isn't exactly the usual one for those on the course.
 
"I would recommend the course to any budding press photographer - particularly those interested in working on a local level - but would stress that they should get some work experience for a few months, to see the largely unglamorous life of a news photographer. Trust me: being on the steps outside the law courts on a cold wet winter morning, waiting for some criminal to pop out of the doors isn't as fun as it sounds."

Sadly, it seems the NCTJ press photography and photojournalism course has closed.

Looking at your work, you seem to be juggling a number of projects and many ideas. How do these develop and where do you find the initial spark for a photographic series?

Photo by James Dodd

"Just before I began my studies, a friend recommended On Being a Photographer by Bill Jay and David Hurn. This was the first time I had really considered what I was doing with photography: what I wanted to do and how I would approach my work.
 
"For instance, there is a chapter called Selecting a Subject which really struck a chord with me; as a result, I now make lists - lots of lists.
 
"I categorise things, score them, tally them and order them into an overall potential visual impact, practicality, interest to others, and my subject knowledge and a few other variables that I added myself.
 
"This methodology is in stark contrast to the type of work I was producing while on the course and working for a few newspapers. I find it difficult as a photographer to relate to something I know little-to-nothing about, and as a press photographer I didn't always have the time to do the research I would have liked. I feel this lack of knowledge and sometimes compassion came through in the pictures. In many ways, I don't even view the pictures I took at this time as my own.
 
"I don't even feel it was me holding the camera back then. I was constrained by the required styles of the specific outlets, and in some instances I was even given specific diagrams which I was instructed to replicate with the camera. I suppose I was more of a ghost-writer than a writer - well, photographer, but you know what I mean.
 
"I come up with lots of ideas, but the initial idea is only the start. Once I've got one I like, I don't just go out and shoot it. I try to understand why I want to shoot it; I do lots of research so I can further understand the subject and almost become a bit of a mini-expert in the area.
 
"Not all of these ideas make it through to the shooting stage, and even then that doesn't guarantee that they become a finished product. Some fall apart when I realise the medium may not suit it, or maybe that I've discovered someone else's work in the area that I think covers it better than I ever could.
 
"I'm not afraid to abandon ideas before completion: as they say, there is no point in trying to flog a dead horse!
 
"On an aesthetic note, I try to take a lot of inspiration from artists outside photography. The works of Andy Warhol and Philip Glass played quite a large part in my Olympic Dreams work, where I studied the aspects of repetition in their work and took ideas from that to present the repetitions in the divers' training sessions. And music in general is central to most of my essays in terms of editing and sequencing."

Many would say that there is no market for this work. That doesn't mean it shouldn't be done, but what do you think? Is there an outlet? Can you make money and produce the work you believe in?

Photo by James Dodd

"I'd love to believe that there is a market for the sort of work I want to produce in the press industry. But I think it's becoming more evident each year that this isn't the case. You only have to look at the huge photojournalism competitions - such as World Press Photo awards - as evidence for this, as only a minority of the winning pictures are featured in the press before they win.
 
"Hopefully we'll see a change in the future - at which point I'll probably start buying newspapers again - for now I'm not even attempting to get this stuff into the mainstream press, though some does get published in the odd specialist magazine and arts folio zines. Instead I'm concentrating on funding the work through alternate avenues.
 
"One amazing thing worth noting is Burn Magazine, where Olympic Dreams was recently featured. They have just started to offer $500 fees to featured photographers - I missed this by about a month. I'd love to see more ventures taking heed from David Alan-Harvey's example."

It's a pragmatic approach. You mentioned you were thinking of going down the PR/wedding route: has that come off? Is it a means to an end? There are many big-name photographers who find a way to fund their "real" work. Do you see that as a solution to the tough economic climate?

"To be honest, only time will tell. If the market changes dramatically, I may reconsider the level of my PR and wedding work. But sure, right now I'm using my personal work - which is what I've come to call this sort of stuff - as a sort of marketing platform for my commercial, editorial, as well as a bit of wedding work, the funds from which then go back into financing the personal work.
 
"However, I haven't ruled out the possibility of funding my personal work through a separate career, maybe going back into the computing route; seeing work by some of the photographers featured over here does give me hope that route could be feasible, even if it is a massive back-up for me.
 
"One thing that I'm seriously working on right now is arts education work. I recently started a creative partnership project in a Birmingham school where I'm teaching photography and journalism in a way which is more integrated into the existing curriculum - sort of using photojournalism as a way to explore their subjects, French Language in this case."

Going back to style, it's something photographers tend to develop over the years. Some evolve; others remain with what they feel is their best way of working. Are you using these projects to find your own style and develop your work?

Photo by James Dodd

"I tend to look at style as a secondary outcome - a sort of by-product of what I do. It changes depending on the constraints placed on a project through the subject, situations, as well as myself.
 
"I do use projects in different ways, though. With Sunday Morning Sales, I wanted a project that I could always shoot, a sort of base project to keep me sharp. Something that would be longer than, say, a single event or something tied to a specific time period. So it had to be something readily available, at a time which suited me and within easy access. I know when and where car-boots will happen, so the idea stuck. Obviously as time progressed, its purpose to me has evolved and will probably continue to do so."

You are also working on the Dead Photographers' Project. What's behind that?

Photo by James Dodd

"A couple of years ago, my dad handed me a box of slides - he runs a removals company which occasionally does house clearances and recycles many of the unwanted items. Knowing my interest in photography, he thought I'd like to flick through the box.
 
"The act of families gathering around the warm glow of a projector to reminisce over stolen moments always fascinated me. I never experienced it myself growing up, but TV and movies introduced me to it. So when I began browsing through hundreds of these photographs I started to feel sorry for the photographers who'd slaved away, shooting for the results to only end up as unwanted items intended for the dump.
 
"Initially it started as an exercise to curate the collection, a way to prove the concept that: 'Everyone has a good photograph in them whether they know it or not'.
 
"But lately I've been looking at it from a slightly different angle. I feel there are many things I can learn from these photographers and their work. Unlike today's digital and throwaway society where we are only too eager to hit the delete key within a moment of capturing the imperfect, accidental and unwanted moments, these old film photographers kept everything.
 
"To me, the images are better for it. Sure, there are those contrived images that document everyone at Aunt Sally's 80th, but I've found that more likely than not, there is one preceding it showing some imperfections: kids playing up to the camera, people not paying attention.
 
"The subjects look more natural in these images - uncontrolled, even. And I feel these pictures probably represent the people in them better for it.
 
"So you could call what I'm doing a bit of a rescue project. And you would be correct, at least in part. At present I've saved somewhere in the region of 2,000 of these photographs from an untimely death in the dump. But my main aim now is to give light to the images, giving them a platform their photographers could never have expected.
 
"The website will be going live any time now and I'm currently sat next to a proof copy the Dead Photographers Magazine. The thing I'm quite excited about, though, is delivering an exhibition for the project. I'm interested in presenting the work in a way to deliver some context and present it in a natural environment. I'll be exhibiting this as part of my residency at some time later in the year."

As if all that weren't enough, you have recently started to get Sheffield on the photo map with an exhibition of Simon Roberts' Motherland series and a slideshow. Is that something that you will continue?

"In March this year, I began an artist residency at Bank Street Arts. Initially this was a research project to discover the wants and needs of the photographic community in Sheffield, but it has since evolved into an attempt to deliver on some of these wants and needs, while looking at the relationship the city has with photography.
 
"We recently exhibited Simon Roberts' Motherland, which has been extremely well received. I think Simon was aware of the situation in the city; after all, he had studied here for about four years and experienced a 'dearth of material' as he put it. And he's right. For a city the size of Sheffield, with over 30 photography-related courses and around 600 students studying each year, there definitely is something amiss.
 
"What I've been doing does seem to be having some effect. Both the slideshows called 'in camera' and Motherland have been consistently listed in the local papers as one of the 'top 10 things to do in South Yorkshire', which is fantastic.
 
"Loads of fellow Sheffield-based photographers have been sending me messages or popping in to ask to be involved on some level and I'm now doing that, partly in an attempt to allow me to concentrate more on my own work again.
 
"I've also recently launched the website www.photosheffield.org.uk which aims to be a central location for all photographic events for the city."

As I said above, James treads many paths and his Olympic Dreams project is one of those featured in the Foto8 Summers Show at Host Gallery in London.

A selection of his car-boot work will be in a group show throughout August at Bank Street Arts in Sheffield. Following that, his Olympic Dreams series is going to be exhibited at the same location, on which he remarks: "I'm quite excited about this. I'm going to be using light boxes to present the images in a darkened space."

I'd like to offer my thanks to James for sharing so many of his thoughts and idea: I'm sure they will provide inspiration to many photographers seeking to find a way into the business.

You can see James' work at his website.

Sunday Morning Sales by James Dodd

Valued exposure: Home Guard

Phil Coomes | 09:57 UK time, Friday, 23 July 2010

Comments

Home Guurd outside County Hall

Members of the Home Guard take over guard duty at the main entrance to County Hall, London, in 1940.

The guards were employees of London County Council at County Hall, and wore their uniforms at work in case of emergency.

The Home Guard, formerly the Local Defence Volunteers (LDV), was formed by the British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 1940 as fears of invasion grew during World War II.

Your pictures of the week: Holes

Phil Coomes | 08:55 UK time, Thursday, 22 July 2010

Comments

Your pictures

Each week, we set a theme and ask you to send in your photographs; this time the theme was a rather odd one, holes.

You can see the pictures I have selected here.

Your picturesMany thanks for those of you who sent in your pictures, lots of imaginative interpretations of the theme.

If your shot didn't make this week's selection, why not send us something for next week?

The new theme is Drive.

Interpret this in any way you see fit and send your pictures to us at yourpics@bbc.co.uk or upload them directly from your computer.

Please include the word "Drive" in the subject line of your message.

The deadline is midnight BST Tuesday 27 July 2010, and remember to add your name and a caption: who, what, where and when should be enough, though the more details you give, the better your chance of being selected.

We will publish a selection of your photos this time next week.

If you want to plan ahead, you can see a list of the upcoming themes here.

Files should be sent as JPEGs. They shouldn't be larger than 10Mb and ideally much smaller: around 1Mb is fine, or you can resize your pictures to 1,000 pixels across.

Please see our terms and conditions, but remember that the copyright remains with you. The pictures will only be used by the BBC for the purposes of this project. Finally, when taking photos, please do not endanger yourself or others, take unnecessary risks or infringe any laws.

Your pictures of the week: Festivals

Phil Coomes | 11:03 UK time, Thursday, 15 July 2010

Comments

Festival in Singapore

Each week, we set a theme and ask you to send in your photographs; this time the theme was festivals so expect lots of colour and smiles.

You can see the pictures I have selected here.

Your picturesMany thanks for those of you who sent in your pictures.

If your shot didn't make this week's selection, why not send us something for next week?

The new theme is Holes. The sun is out so there should be lots of opportunities to shoot some exciting pictures this week.

Interpret this in any way you see fit and send your pictures to us at yourpics@bbc.co.uk or upload them directly from your computer.

Please include the word "Holes" in the subject line of your message.

The deadline is midnight BST Tuesday 20 July 2010, and remember to add your name and a caption: who, what, where and when should be enough, though the more details you give, the better your chance of being selected.

We will publish a selection of your photos this time next week.

If you want to plan ahead, you can see a list of the upcoming themes here.

Files should be sent as JPEGs. They shouldn't be larger than 10Mb and ideally much smaller: around 1Mb is fine, or you can resize your pictures to 1,000 pixels across.

Please see our terms and conditions, but remember that the copyright remains with you. The pictures will only be used by the BBC for the purposes of this project. Finally, when taking photos, please do not endanger yourself or others, take unnecessary risks or infringe any laws.

Valued exposure: Photographers and Live Aid

Phil Coomes | 10:27 UK time, Tuesday, 13 July 2010

Comments

Bob Geldof launching the LIve Aid book in 1985

On this day 25 years ago 72,000 people packed Wembley Stadium in London for Live Aid. Pictures of the event were beamed to more than 1.5 billion people in 160 countries, the biggest broadcast ever known.

The concert was organised by Bob Geldof who is pictured here with photographers at the launch of the Live Aid book at Hamilton's Gallery in London.

This photograph is held in the archive of Rex Features and is credited to Nils Jorgensen who also appears in the picture, so he's either a fast runner using the self-timer, or more than likely he enlisted some help.

Other photographers in the shot include Richard Young, Alan Davidson, Duncan Raban and Steve Rapport.

Maybe someone out there can help identify the others?

Nils is also a fine street photographer and his work can be seen on his website.

Footnote: Regular followers of the Valued exposure slot will be pleased to know that it will return to the picture index a few weeks after the recently announced changes to the news website have been implemented.

A few shots from my Kodachrome project

Phil Coomes | 13:41 UK time, Friday, 9 July 2010

Comments

As the summer progresses and time runs out on my Kodachrome project which began back in October I thought I'd update you a little on its progress.

For those of you who are new to this blog then the project is a simple one. I set out to mark the passing of Kodachrome, a film that has been around for 75 years and to which much of the representation of the past is entrusted.

My goal is to publish a picture everyday on Flickr over a period of 64 weeks, ending on 31 December this year. The only version of the film available now is the 64 ISO one, hence the number of weeks in the project.

The winter months were tough as I've got used to the high ISO's that are available to digital photographers but the summer sun helps to lift spirits. The project has no theme, just simple scenes stumbled upon in the course of a day, nothing is set up, and these are snaps in the true sense of the word.

You can follow the project on Flickr or via the project website as a slideshow.

Photo by Phil Coomes

Photo by Phil Coomes

Photo by Phil Coomes

Photo by Phil Coomes

Photo by Phil Coomes

Photo by Phil Coomes

Photo by Phil Coomes

Photo by Phil Coomes

If you are shooting any Kodachrome or digitizing old rolls then do get in touch.

A colleague of mine suggested that we run a final frame gallery. So when you've shot your final roll of Kodachrome (which must be at the processors in Kansas by the end of the year) scan the final frame and email to me with a few words about the shot and I'll run some of them in this blog.

I'll mention this again nearer the time but do keep it in mind.

Your pictures of the week: Gardening

Phil Coomes | 11:40 UK time, Thursday, 8 July 2010

Comments

Photo by Helen Bourdeaux

Each week, we set a theme and ask you to send in your photographs; this time the theme was gardening.

You can see the pictures I have selected here.

Your picturesMany thanks for those of you who sent in your pictures, seems lots of our readers have green fingers.

If your shot didn't make this week's selection, why not send us something for next week?

The new theme is Festival. The sun is out so there should be lots of opportunities to shoot some exciting pictures this week.

Interpret this in any way you see fit and send your pictures to us at yourpics@bbc.co.uk or upload them directly from your computer.

Please include the word "Festival" in the subject line of your message.

The deadline is midnight BST Tuesday 13 July 2010, and remember to add your name and a caption: who, what, where and when should be enough, though the more details you give, the better your chance of being selected.

We will publish a selection of your photos this time next week.

If you want to plan ahead, you can see a list of the upcoming themes here.

Files should be sent as JPEGs. They shouldn't be larger than 10Mb and ideally much smaller: around 1Mb is fine, or you can resize your pictures to 1,000 pixels across.

Please see our terms and conditions, but remember that the copyright remains with you. The pictures will only be used by the BBC for the purposes of this project. Finally, when taking photos, please do not endanger yourself or others, take unnecessary risks or infringe any laws.

Steve McCurry: Retrospective

Phil Coomes | 10:28 UK time, Thursday, 8 July 2010

Comments

Photographer Steve McCurry is perhaps best known for his picture of the green eyed Afghan girl who stared out from the front page of National Geographic in the 1980s, yet his portfolio is crammed with powerful colour shots from around the globe.

Part travel photographer, part photo-journalist, a retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, where he spoke about his methods and in more detail about a number of his pictures.

Steve said:

"When walking in the street I'm opened up to a certain kind of person, a person who will speak to me in a very profound way, and once I find that person, I get very excited. I suddenly get very enthusiastic, and I think my enthusiasm is infectious and suddenly we have this chemistry, this sort of bond where I'm so enamoured with them and how they look and how the present themselves.
 
"It's actually a really quite an odd thing to walk up to a stranger and yet within a matter of seconds to be able to try and persuade them to actually stop what they were doing and to allow me to take their picture. I've sort of developed a way that is in part showing respect, plus there's an element of humour to try and defuse the sort of embarrassing, awkward situation."

Photo by Steve McCurry/Magnum Photos

"You know the thing that was so astonishing about these coal miners in Afghanistan, they go underground for 12 hours a day, they go in six o'clock in the morning and when the sun's setting they come back out. They've been breathing coal dust all day long, there's no protective gear except this sort of flimsy helmet. But the first thing this man did when he came out to the ground, after breathing all this coal dust, is light up a cigarette. And I just found it so amazing."

Photo by Steve McCurry/Magnum Photos

"I had photographed these fishermen with this very unique way of fishing from the shore and after a while I realised that to get the best angle was to join them, so I had to wade into the water up to my waist. It's such a strange and wonderful way they fish perched on this pole, which is jammed on this coral reef, and they sit there for a couple of hours in the morning, and then couple of hour in the late afternoon, and I was amazed with how much fish they can actually catch.
 
"One of the ways I work is I shoot, I think about it, I wonder how can I do this better, and then I go back again the next day and sometimes I go back five, 10, 15 times, waiting and looking and exploring the best moment and the best situation and angle. Getting the right composition boils down to hard work."

Photo by Steve McCurry/Magnum Photos

"I think most photographs require a lot of work to get right. This is one of these gifts that sort of falls on your lap. I was riding through the desert on a taxi in Rajasthan, when suddenly out of nowhere this dust storm kind of whipped up, and within seconds the sky had gone dark, and this really strong wind was blowing.
 
"I looked off into this field and saw these women dressed in very colourful clothes, huddled together protecting themselves from the wind, and they were singing. I literally opened the door, dashed out, ran across this field and I shot I guess 15 or 20 exposures and made to or three what I felt really good pictures. And then, just as quickly as this dust storm started it stopped, and the whole thing was over and they just went back to work. The whole thing lasted no more than two minutes."

Photo by Steve McCurry/Magnum Photos

"I've been going back to this visual ancient quarter of Jodhpur for probably 20 years, and I know that area very well, I must have photographed every street. But there was one corner that I realised had potential for an interesting composition with these hand prints on the wall.
 
"It was a major thoroughfare with people coming and going. I was photographing people coming towards me and away from me and there were a number of really interesting pictures. In fact I went back there the next day. And as I was editing, I realised that one of these pictures which I hadn't really remembered taking was one of this boy running and I caught him in kind of mid-leap, it just had this kind of wonderful decisive moment to it. I was very pleased with that picture."

Steve also spoke about his most famous picture of the Afghan girl, Sharbat Gula, he said:

"I was doing a story on the Afghan-Pakistan border, this was a time when there were three million Afghans living in Pakistan. And one morning I was wandering through this refugee camp in Peshawar and heard these voices coming from this tent. I went over and looked in and I realised it was a girls school. These were girls around 12 years of age. I started to talk to the teacher to see what was going on, and as I was surveying the situation I noticed this one little girl sitting off in the corner with these amazing eyes, I've never seen anything like that.
 
"Eventually I asked the teacher if I could photograph her and for the next couple of minutes I made five or 10 frames of her. And for a brief moment the light was right, the composition was right, the background was right, everything was right and I made the picture.
 
"Once it was published on the cover of National Geographic we literally got thousands of letters. People willing to send her money, people wanted to adopt her, there were even men who wanted to find her and marry her. It just never let up over the 17 years.
 
"Many years later I went back to see I could find her. I was a little bit apprehensive because I thought is this going to be good for her? But then I thought this would be an opportunity if we could help her, give back to her, and actually compensate her for all the usage of that picture and make her life better. And I thought this would be the overriding, the most important thing we could do.
 
"We found her, and she was married to a baker and had three children. She was living in a small village in Afghanistan. She seems to have a pretty good life; although extremely poor, her husband was making only one dollar a day.
 
"Her big dream in life was to have her children educated and to perform Hajj. So National Geographic actually made that happen for her. Not only her but she brought 11 of her relatives and friends on this trip which was really and truly once in a lifetime experience for them. And then they organised a particular kind of compensation for her.
 
"I did of course photograph her again. Photographing her without her burqa was totally up to her and her husband. We had a lot of help from her community but somehow this thing came together and with this cooperation she was willing to be photographed."

You can read more about the story of how they found Sharbat on the National Geographic website.

More of Steve McCurry's work can be seen on his website.

Thanks to Fergus Nicoll of World Today on the BBC World Service who recorded this interview.

World Cup in focus (5)

Phil Coomes | 12:25 UK time, Tuesday, 6 July 2010

Comments

As Uruguay prepares for a World Cup semi-final against the Netherlands Denis Paquin, deputy director of photography at Associated Press, talks about how they handle penalty shoot-outs.

"Following extra time in the quarter-final between Uruguay and Ghana our team of photographers took up different positions around the pitch for the penalty shoot-out.
 
"It's important to not only to cover every angle, but to ensure that everyone knows their assignment once the shoot-out begins. That direction is given to each of our coverage teams before every match by World Cup photo leader Tony Hicks in order for every aspect to be properly captured.
 
"One photographer will position him or herself behind the goal, while others will take up position in the corners, along the sidelines while the opposite end and overhead photographers maintain their positions.
 
"The division of duties will dictate that someone will be watching the penalty kicker, the goalkeeper, and the other team members while the one overhead focuses tightly on the goalkeeper and the other with a view of the penalty taker and goalkeeper.
 
"The end result is well co-ordinated coverage to capture the various moments that we will send to our worldwide subscribers to illustrate the game ending story."

There follows a range of shots from the game.

Uruguay players, left, and Ghana players, right, line up during penalty shootoutsUruguay, left, and Ghana, right, line up during the penalty shoot-out. Photo by Fernando Vergara/AP

02WCUP764.jpgUruguay's Sebastian Abreu, left, scores against Ghana goalkeeper Richard Kingson. Photo by Rebecca Blackwell/AP

03aWCUP745.jpgGhana's Dominic Adiyiah fails to score on a shoot-out penalty past Uruguay goalkeeper Fernando Muslera. Photo by Luca Bruno/AP

03WCUP805.jpgUruguay's Sebastian Abreu celebrates after scoring the decisive goal. Photo by Ivan Sekretarev/AP

04WCUP748.jpgUruguay's Diego Forlan, left, scores. Photo by Ivan Sekretarev/AP

05WCUP759.jpgGhana's Dominic Adiyiah reacts after missing his penalty. Photo by Bernat Armangue/AP

08WCUP809.jpgUruguay's Sebastian Abreu celebrates as his team go through to the next round. Photo by Themba Hadebe/AP

09CUP814.jpgUruguay players celebrate victory. Photo by Bernat Armangue/AP

Related posts:
World cup in focus (4): Crossing the line
World cup in focus (3): Cropping
World cup in focus (2): Rob Green
World cup in focus (1): The logistics

Belfast and Beyond: Through the Viewfinder

Phil Coomes | 15:11 UK time, Monday, 5 July 2010

Comments

Photo by John Baucher

Have you ever been at a photographic exhibition and seen a shot you admire and really wanted to just grab it from the wall and take it home. Well, if you are in Belfast then this is the show for you.

Photographic artist, John Baucher (aka Moochin Photoman on Flickr), is displaying more than 1,000 portraits that he has taken around Belfast.

He said:

"The pictures are of musicians, street drinkers, young 'hood's', poets, tourists, visitors, politicians and residents. It's a diverse bunch all taken using Through the Viewfinder' technique or TtV."

This technique is where you shoot through the Viewfinder of one camera, using another camera.

The prints on showJohn added:

"It is the biggest ever show of the technique to be held anywhere in the world. All the photographs are mounted so that they can be taken down on the closing night, a TtV Takeaway.
 
"This is in the spirit of the photo sharing website Flickr. I found out about the technique there and so wanted to share the photos so people I photographed can come and take their portrait away, but also other photos, so the whole exhibition will disassemble itself."

Other TtVer's are involved as shots from Australia, India, Canada and the USA will be on show. Added to that John is running a masterclass on the technique as well.

The exhibition is part of the Trans festival and can be seen at the Waterfront Gallery 2, Belfast, from 5 July to 24 July. Full details can be found here.

You can seen more of John's TtV work on his blog and his Flickr page.

Photos by John Baucher

Your pictures of the week: Refreshing

Phil Coomes | 09:40 UK time, Thursday, 1 July 2010

Comments

Photo by Liz Hogan

Each week, we set a theme and ask you to send in your photographs; this time the theme was refreshing.

You can see the pictures I have selected here.

Your picturesMany thanks for those of you who sent in your pictures, we've even got two fisheye shots in the set this week.

If your shot didn't make this week's selection, why not send us something for next week?

The new theme is Gardening. The sun is out so there should be lots of opportunities to shoot some exciting pictures this week.

Interpret this in any way you see fit and send your pictures to us at yourpics@bbc.co.uk or upload them directly from your computer.

Please include the word "Gardening" in the subject line of your message.

The deadline is midnight BST Tuesday 6 July 2010, and remember to add your name and a caption: who, what, where and when should be enough, though the more details you give, the better your chance of being selected.

We will publish a selection of your photos this time next week.

If you want to plan ahead, you can see a list of the upcoming themes here.

Files should be sent as JPEGs. They shouldn't be larger than 10Mb and ideally much smaller: around 1Mb is fine, or you can resize your pictures to 1,000 pixels across.

Please see our terms and conditions, but remember that the copyright remains with you. The pictures will only be used by the BBC for the purposes of this project. Finally, when taking photos, please do not endanger yourself or others, take unnecessary risks or infringe any laws.

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.