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Cameron's very personal plea

Nick Robinson | 16:32 UK time, Thursday, 8 October 2009

So near to power and yet so far to go.

No wonder he looked and sounded nervous - his voice struggling to meet the scale of the occasion.

David Cameron knows that most people assume he will be our next prime minister. He knows that they could so easily be proved wrong.

David Cameron

This was a speech designed to answer those who say they don't know what he really believes. His answer - a traditional Conservative one - family... community... country.

It was a speech designed too to show what makes him angry - that was Labour's belief that "big government" was the cure rather than the problem.

The Tory leader believes that Gordon Brown is stuck in an old political rut in which voters make their choice on the basis of rival shopping lists of give-aways, political dividing lines and who they fear more.

Hence his claim that what matters more than manifestos and policies was judgement, temperament and character.

So, this was a very personal plea to the British people to trust him to sort out the mess he says Labour has created.

It's going to be a long and nerve-racking wait to see if they do.

Comments

Page 1 of 4

  • Comment number 1.

    Cameron gave a 'nice' speech, with some good points, but also full of slogans and a lot of simplifications of complex policy issues.
    For example Cameron argued: if government reduces the public debt now, then government will save the interest payable on the debt, then the government has more to spend on essential public services. Sounds simple enough, does it? Unfortunately, it is just that: much too simple an argument. What are the consequences of reducing the debt right now? How much will unemployment have to rise as a consequence?
    How could this rise in unemployment possibly increase the tax income of government?

    Also there was not one mentioning of the biggest, real cause of the current economic crisis: the mad excesses of the financial services sector.
    Citizens and tax payers worldwide had to guarantee 15 Trillion US dollars in government support to save their economies from collapsing.
    Not one mentioning of the mad excesses in the banking sector and not one critique of his friends and supporter in the 'City of London'.
    This 'omission' tells everyone where he thinks the power lies and who he does not want to confront seriously.
    Are we really all equal and in it together? Not according to Cameron's speech. He 'forgot' to spell out his plan how to mend the biggest,
    worst malfunction of all in our 'broken society', which has almost bankrupted the UK: the immoral, reckless and corrupt 'City of London'.
    Much to the delight of Murdoch and Ashcroft, the two non-UK residents who seem to have more influence over the Conservatives
    than UK citizens, the two billionaires who Cameron wants to please most. Equal treatment for all?
    Please read more about the biggest necessity of all, which is more important for a fairer society than the many laudable points raised by Cameron: to rein in the financial services sector and to liberate the UK citizens from being impoverished by a greedy, unaccountable financial 'elite'.
    Please read more at:
    https://globalinsights.wordpress.com/

  • Comment number 2.

    Cameron kicked ass. He made Gordon Brown look like the narrow minded tribal idiots Labour are.

    The Tories look like a safe pair of hands. Labour look worn out and confused as to how they have totally ruined the country.

  • Comment number 3.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 4.

    A serious speech for serious times. Some good uplifting stuff in there too.
    I'm glad he didn't do that much of kicking Labour. The whole country knows what a mess they have got the coountry into over the last 12 years, what was needed was the antidote to this ruination and we got a vision for putting that right.
    Roll on the election!

  • Comment number 5.

    Well I watched it in full and I have to say he came acros to me, I am however a member of that camp called 'anything but Brown'. So I was persuaded. I think this man has what it takes...I know that our current lamentable Prime Minister has not got what it takes to run the country and the irony is that the majority of the senior New Labour [whatever that means anymore]leaders knew it...Blair forecast it....and none of them, not one, had the guts to take him on when he was 'crowned'.

    He has no mandate from the British people whatsoever.....bring on an election. We do need change...and urgently. Rediscover that moral compass of yours Prime Minister and give us a chance to show you how we feel about the last 12 years.

  • Comment number 6.

    He looked and sounded like a lightweight.

  • Comment number 7.

    If the banking sector is the real cause of the current financial crisis, why is our country around 760 bn in debt? The banks only account for around 130 bn of that. Where does the rest of it come from?

    I suppose you could say, "Brown carried on spending as if the economy, powered by the banking sector, could carry on growing at an exponential rate (even though most commentaters were saying it couldn't) and when reality caught up with Brown as it was bound to do the whole rotten edifice collapsed"

    But I doubt you would.

  • Comment number 8.

    I remember not long ago, when the dynamic leader of the Tories, Iain Duncan Smith, received 18 standing ovations during his leaders speech.In view of vacuDave's pathetic performance, was 3 justified? Will today's speech by the Tory leader be regarded as the worst by any party leader in modern political history?

  • Comment number 9.

    #2 jonathan_cook

    Ha ha, you are joking aren't you? Tories a safe pair of hands? If they are then they're covered in thick layers of very slippery grease.

    Anyway, it was the wrong metaphor to use because it doesn't take into account the 'fingers in their pie'.

    Oh dear, all aboard the Titanic only this time there'll be no Molly Brown.

    This metaphor lark would be fun if it wasn't tragic.

  • Comment number 10.

    I have to say, seeing the two speeches side by side, the choice for a floating voter would not be difficult (and it is only the floaters that count).. A dour, sulking negative GB or a bright, confident positive DC... no brainer!

  • Comment number 11.

    Great speech Dave,I voted Labour last time, now it's the Conservatives all the way, well done my son.

  • Comment number 12.

    Not a perfect speech but definetly adaquate. Alot of the commentators recently have been saying that its Brown's election to lose, but with more criticism of tory policy coming out at the moment its swinging slightly back towards Cameron's to lose.

    I don't want Brown back in, but then I'm scared ******* at the thought of boy george in charge of the strings. I've got no idea who to vote for.

  • Comment number 13.

    Cameron and the Conservatives could reinvigorate my pride of being British.

    I may even move back to the UK if things improve sufficiently (as I believe that they will).

  • Comment number 14.

    David Cameron delivered a brilliant, heartfelt, strong, passionate speech of conviction. I trust him implicitly.

    What I do feel though is that it must be some daunting task which is ahead of him as our next Prime Minister after the most politically turbulent decade ever.

    The mission has to be that we trust him and his new government and that we do our bit by being responsible, law abiding, strong families.

    We NEED HIM to work for us and he NEEDS US to sustain him in his chosen path of responsibility for our country, a country which he said he loves. That is enough for me. I will definitely vote for him, no question.

  • Comment number 15.

    Well, I trust him more than I trust Gordon Brown. But I still think I'd trust my cat to run the country just a little bit more than either of them.

  • Comment number 16.

    8

    Nope.

  • Comment number 17.

    #2:

    "The Tories look like a safe pair of hands. Labour look worn out and confused as to how they have totally ruined the country."

    Well, I don't think anyone could disagree with the second part of that.

    But the Tories? A safe pair of hands? Seriously? I can only assume you're too young to remember what happened the last time they were in power.

  • Comment number 18.

    IslandDoctor wrote:-
    "Rediscover that moral compass of yours Prime Minister and give us a chance to show you how we feel about the last 12 years."
    Fat chance of Gutless Gordon doing that- he wouldn't even let his Labour colleagues a vote on Blairs replacement . No it's Gordons turn and he will wait until the last possible moment before calling an election - and if that results in digging an even bigger financial hole for the country that's just too bad.

    PS I thought David Cameron's closing speech at the conference was superb.

  • Comment number 19.

    what I would like to see it labour win the next election just IMF called in usual and britian bankrupted then the labour partry tears inself apart. Then the next election see a good majority that allow the Governement to sort out the issues. So we have 2010 april election and
    then another in october.

    but really would like the situation to be sort now so have the election
    and get a goos majority to sort out this mess and see labour implode for at least 25 years,

    As Sagamix says its going to take 25 years to sort this out

  • Comment number 20.

    People who use "Ha ha" in writing.

    Run out of ideas? Resorting to childish point and laugh?

    Any actual points to make?

    Thought not. Off you pop.

  • Comment number 21.

    Nick,
    Having read the first 13 comments posted I do have to say that I must have been listening to a different speech, because the interpretation from some on here are just plain stupid or they must be deaf.
    Sorry, but it riles me that some people cannot even offer sensible debate.

  • Comment number 22.

    Despite being a tory I am not impressed. There is a consistent unwillingness to give the full story and this conference has been undermined by seriously inept policy announcements eg:

    1. Pension age to rise to 66 soon, the next day oops we didnt mean it for women

    2. Cameron pre-conference on 50% tax band said if it didnt raise any money it wouldnt be retained - Osbourne at conference we are keeping the 50% band (it still will not raise any money as you have been repeatedly told)

    3. Total announced savings £7bn, with maybe another £8-10bn due the pension change - amount of govt spending we need to cut is probably around £100 bn a year. Good start but you need to be much bolder

    4. Slashing MOD civil servants by 25%. There are almost as many civil servants (85,000) as there are active members of the armed forces (99,000). Lets be generous and assume the actual ratio of bureaucrats to armed forces is 2:3 in other countries it is 1:3 or even 1:5 so it is not a 25% cut you should be aiming for but a 60% cut - of course private sector companies head office is even leaner than this, they would probably run the armed forces with under 5000 civil servants.

    What I am seeing is the inevitable desire for simple and good headlines over anything resembling coherent economics

  • Comment number 23.

    VacuDave clearly does not have Boris on board.He made it plain that he thinks the leader's policy on Europe is 'barmy', and the only issue of any importanc is restoring the fortunes of the financial buffoons in the City.If the Tory leader is sincere about the plight of disadvantaged children in schools, regarded as not good enough, will he use his influence to argue for a number of places to be made available at Eton for those children? Actions are still more important than words.His speech was about as inspirational as a wet weekend in Manchester.

  • Comment number 24.

    8 braveSouter

    "Will today's speech by the Tory leader be regarded as the worst by any party leader in modern political history?"

    No - it was, after all, balanced and coherent.

    But I am happy for you to carry on in the same vein. Because if yours is the best that the left can manage in terms of inciteful and incisive criticism of the content of the speech, and on the current showing it is, then I think the wider voting public are going to find the Conservative arguments uniquely convincing.

  • Comment number 25.

    We need the responsibility so we can run our own lives back.
    We need to have our country back. We need to get rid of the nanny state.

    We need to get rid of so much this labour government have inflicted on us and Cameron's speech today outlined how he would abolish all the red tape and interfering busybodies from our lives that we loathe so much.

    We don't need reassurance that he can do it for that is something that could be clearly recognised some time ago.

    It was not a rip roaring speech and no one should have expected that but it was a clear vision of how he wanted to take the country beyond the present shambles. A plan to work on at last.

    I hope it left those hoping to fight the next election as a class war wondering which side they really should be on.


  • Comment number 26.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 27.

    The tories seem to have lost the plot. They have bet everything on Dave's slogan "Labour's Debt Crisis".
    Yes, debt is very high, but for good reason, and them coming in slashing spending after 100 days will have us back in recession, heading for a depression - and people are starting to realise that.

    Even Dave had to admit on C4 news last night to Jon Snow that "There is a risk of a debt crisis" only.

    Rest of his speech (outside the personal stuuf) was usual vacuous PR man Dave.

  • Comment number 28.

    2010: UK ditches tired and incompetent Labour and votes Tory.

    2018: UK ditches tired and incompetent Tories and votes Labour.

    2026: UK ditches tired and incompetent Labour and votes Tory.

    2034: UK ditches tired and incompetent Tories and votes Labour.

    etc...

    (Precise years subject to change)


    When will this cycle be broken?

    When will we learn?

  • Comment number 29.

    19. Your English grammar and spelling is hilarious but I am not criticising you, it's quite entertaining!

    I absolutely love the way you describe Labour as needing to "implode", very apt! The mind boggles.

    And, yes, let's hope they implode and then leave the planet altogether.

  • Comment number 30.

    From Nick's blog: "So, this was a very personal plea to the British people to trust him to sort out the mess he says Labour has created.

    It's going to be a long and nerve-racking wait to see if they do."
    ******************************

    You are right about the 'long, nerve-wracking wait' Nick.
    Gordon will hang on to power until the last possible date before calling an election - probably even then he will be hoping for a last minute natural disaster of some sort so he can delay it even longer.
    My fear is that during these last months, Gordon can and possibly might, become even more reckless and make commitments he won't have to meet.

    A sensible man would accept that the Country is crying out for an election and call one.
    He constantly reminds us he is the best man for the job and has the right policies. Why doesn't he have the courage to trust us to confirm that view?
    Mind you, there is that small matter of installing The Blairs in as King and Queen of Europe to be dealt with first though. Forgot about that!

  • Comment number 31.

    "So , this was a very personal plea to the British people to trust him to sort out the mess he says Labour has created.

    It's going to be a long and nerve-racking wait to see if they do."

    ===

    Who for, the BBC?

  • Comment number 32.

    8. At 4:55pm on 08 Oct 2009, braveSouter wrote:
    "I remember not long ago, when the dynamic leader of the Tories, Iain Duncan Smith, received 18 standing ovations during his leaders speech.In view of vacuDave's pathetic performance, was 3 justified? Will today's speech by the Tory leader be regarded as the worst by any party leader in modern political history?"

    You obviously weren't watching the same speech I was. Surely you mean: "The worst by any party leader since last week".

  • Comment number 33.

    I noticed that in his speech Cameron did pay tribute to the things that Labour have done well (the minimum wage, devolution, civil partnerships). This makes a refreshing change from Labour's unrelenting criticism of the Tories, even when the latter are in opposition.

    I also noticed that Cameron attacked Labour for what they have done, not for who they are. This again is a welcome change from Labour's 'Tory toff' and similar personal attacks.

    Cameron appealed over the heads of conference to the voters of Britain. By contrast Brown appealed to the Tory-hating activists in conference.

    And Clegg? (technical note: he's the leader of the LibDems). He said it was his turn to be Prime Minister, but not much else that I can remember.

  • Comment number 34.

    8. At 4:55pm on 08 Oct 2009, braveSouter wrote:
    I remember not long ago, when the dynamic leader of the Tories, Iain Duncan Smith, received 18 standing ovations during his leaders speech.In view of vacuDave's pathetic performance, was 3 justified? Will today's speech by the Tory leader be regarded as the worst by any party leader in modern political history?

    ===

    Probably by you, yes!

  • Comment number 35.

    Thought it was a very good, matter-of-fact speech which is precisely what's needed at this time. I'm a floating voter no more - Cameron would be a far more preferable PM than the robotic and soulless Brown.

    Oh, and a BIG thank you to the BBC for cutting away as Bono appeared on screen.

  • Comment number 36.

    Nothing's changed. We have a choice between proven failure and potential disaster. Thank goodness that I live in Scotland and have a sane alternative to the Unionist Tweedledum and Tweedledee.

  • Comment number 37.

    17 DisgustedofMitcham2

    "But the Tories? A safe pair of hands? Seriously? I can only assume you're too young to remember what happened the last time they were in power."

    Actually, I am old enough to remember what happened last time the Tories were in power. Contrary to the image of tragedy that you would clearly like to generate, the economy ran well, people had jobs, food, houses, cars, the NHS worked fairly eficiently, as did education, nationally we paid off debt and, as we gradually rid ourselves of the weight of the disaster of the previous Labour government, we mostly got richer.

    Doubtless, given the chance, you would like to tell us all about unemployment, repossessions and personal bankruptcy, but that is exactly what is going on right now under Labour mismanagement, so those sorts of stories don't really have the kind of traction you would wish them to.

  • Comment number 38.

    I like the bit about punishing the criminal and supporting the victim.
    There must be a whole generation out there who will wonder what that means.

  • Comment number 39.

    23. At 5:21pm on 08 Oct 2009, braveSouter wrote:
    VacuDave clearly does not have Boris on board.He made it plain that he thinks the leader's policy on Europe is 'barmy', and the only issue of any importanc is restoring the fortunes of the financial buffoons in the City.If the Tory leader is sincere about the plight of disadvantaged children in schools, regarded as not good enough, will he use his influence to argue for a number of places to be made available at Eton for those children? Actions are still more important than words.His speech was about as inspirational as a wet weekend in Manchester.

    ===

    Why would you want to have disadvantaged children branded as "Eton Toffs"? What kind of sick mind do you have?

  • Comment number 40.

    "braveSouter wrote:
    I remember not long ago, when the dynamic leader of the Tories, Iain Duncan Smith, received 18 standing ovations during his leaders speech.In view of vacuDave's pathetic performance, was 3 justified? Will today's speech by the Tory leader be regarded as the worst by any party leader in modern political history?"

    I suppose it depends on if you judge a value of the speech by the content or the number of stage-managed standing ovations!

  • Comment number 41.

    #17 disgusted_of_mitcham2 wrote:
    "But the Tories? A safe pair of hands? Seriously? I can only assume you're too young to remember what happened the last time they were in power."

    Ken Clarke left a sound economy, for one thing.

    We could also talk about the economic crisis Labour left behind in 1979.

    There might even be signs of a pattern here.

  • Comment number 42.

    "DisgustedOfMitcham2 wrote:
    Well, I trust him more than I trust Gordon Brown. But I still think I'd trust my cat to run the country just a little bit more than either of them."

    If your cat could get a party together it might just stand a chance :)

  • Comment number 43.

    Sounds as if it's going to be nerve-wracking for you, Nick.
    I thought Cameron made Brown look the bumbling, mechanical bureaucrat that he really is. This speech had substance and clarity. For those who complain that it was rhetoric: sure it was, it was meant to be. Some policy details had come earlier in the conference; this was a rallying call, identifying the different emphasis that the Conservatives have, rightly summed up as RESPONSIBILITY.
    A word that clearly sends shivers through the supporters of the benefits culture.

  • Comment number 44.

    26. At 5:26pm on 08 Oct 2009, rjaggar

    Why not go the whole hog and have them both sit on the naughty step?

    Really, what an outstanding piece of nonsense in a sea of nonsense.

  • Comment number 45.

    You are quite right Nick. There wasn't much substance except repeating what every Leader says what he/she stands for. Heard it all before, thank you.

    As you mention, Cameron did look scared, and the reason for that is because he has not yet managed to grasp the great big GLOBAL financial problem. He therefore knows that giving too much away in terms of the hidden agenda would destroy him on the spot.

    Nick, you say that Cameron said that he is about a traditional Conservative one of - family... community... country.

    Now Cameron is not new on the political arena. Where was Cameron in the early 90s when everything was going down the drain and our society was not only broken, but ended up having a third world NHS, with all the destruction of the traditional British communities, thanks to Tory gross mismanagement of the economy, the destruction of our industrial wealth, when we did not have any hint of a GLOBAL financial disaster, as we have today?

    Why did Cameron mention his family? Does he want to know what it is about trying to care for a severely disabled son who is now 30 and at the same time going to work? Misfortunes happen to a lot of people around the world, but we deal with them as best as we can, and in our own way!

    So, no, Cameron is not new, in fact we know quite a lot about how he understands macro economics. His way of dealing with the situation is cuts, and more cuts, NOW, so that when the pot starts to fill up he can keep his promises to the ones that took us into this financial earthquake, and it is not about re-regulation at all. It is about WORLD agreements so that what happened can be avoided in the future. No use having the BOE with more powers cause no one, but no one in the western world knew or at least could understand what the Bankers were up to. Gambling is a very polite word!

    If anyone of them could have at least said something more about the Bankers then Darling did, I would have started to try and pull the rope with the Tories again. NOTHING OF THE SORT. BLANK, VOID, ZILCH, SHTUM, but all we got was finger pointing by Osborne, and the Bankers are giving him the finger back to him!

    You've lost it again, and when Nick sees it that way, there is trouble ahead!

    Good night Nick, and well done.

  • Comment number 46.

    27. At 5:27pm on 08 Oct 2009, Billmcfadden wrote:
    The tories seem to have lost the plot. They have bet everything on Dave's slogan "Labour's Debt Crisis".
    Yes, debt is very high, but for good reason, and them coming in slashing spending after 100 days will have us back in recession, heading for a depression - and people are starting to realise that.

    ===

    The Chief Executive of HSBC already thinks we are heading for a double-dip recession. Why do you think he thinks that?

  • Comment number 47.

    Cameron makes a close of conference speech and the BBC publishes a page about his wife's dress in the politics section???

  • Comment number 48.

    23. At 5:21pm on 08 Oct 2009, braveSouter wrote:
    ......His speech was about as inspirational as a wet weekend in Manchester.
    *********************

    But not as wet and uninspiring as your postings on this board.

  • Comment number 49.

    #29 thanks , were not all perfect , was educated under that labour lot of 74-79. I'm left handed which does not help. Never given the right way to write for left handed peoples.

    laobour have done so much damage particulary in the family courts and I would like to see them pick up the tab for that in the courts with some of them going to jail for there responsibilies in this fiasco

  • Comment number 50.

    23. At 5:21pm on 08 Oct 2009, braveSouter wrote:
    VacuDave clearly does not have Boris on board.He made it plain that he thinks the leader's policy on Europe is 'barmy', and the only issue of any importanc is restoring the fortunes of the financial buffoons in the City.If the Tory leader is sincere about the plight of disadvantaged children in schools, regarded as not good enough, will he use his influence to argue for a number of places to be made available at Eton for those children? Actions are still more important than words.His speech was about as inspirational as a wet weekend in Manchester.


    ------------

    They're called scholarships and bursaries.

    I was the lucky recipient of one myself (though not to Eton). Available to hard working children from poor families who could not otherwise afford the fees.

  • Comment number 51.

    More gaffs.

    Sorry Nick you and Andrew got it badly wrong again. Spencer was a Manchester man and Marks came from Leeds. They set up Business in Manchester Derby road in 1894 the business grew from there. Many other leading Iconic business Partnerships also started in Manchester like Rolls & Royce. M and S certainly had nothing to do with the East End research research research.

    Top class well balanced speech from Mr Cameron looks as if Manchester has spawned another great partnership the Conservatives and the public in accountable, approachable government. Government of the people by the people for the people came to my mind.

  • Comment number 52.

    To use his personal grief as an electioneering appeal/ploy just about sums-up this weak, vacillating, vain and undeservedly rich man.

    Sickening.

    I'm sorry, the loss of a child is devastating to any family. However, when I compare the dignity and sombre presence of mind of the parents of the young lady whose body has been discovered after 13 years, and the cloying, unctious Cameron style, "..you wonder is this really what I want..?" I.e. Should I be noble and carry on because that's what is right to do! Urgh! Double urgh!

    My goodness, Brown with his wretched 'Kirk parents' and now this! Is there a Leader anywhere in G.B. prepared to get on with the job of leadership and not use and play on sentiment-sympathy-smarminess?

  • Comment number 53.

    I am puzzled by the strange torrent of abusive comments in the initial response to this blog. Nothing very positive - just abusive. I didn't hear the speech, as I have a job,, but I read the report. It seems Mr Cameron put together a reasonably coherent set of messages. Much as I would expect.

    Why the torrent of abuse? Are there rooms full of professional anti-bloggers sitting ready with texts to cut and paste into BBC blog streams as soon as they open? I suppose there must be. An army of Liba and Labs to attack this week, and an army of Labs and Cons last week.

    Oh dear. That's another technology wasted.

  • Comment number 54.

    #25 & #33

    I agree with both of your comments.

    I have not been wholly convinced by Cameron but I felt the speech was thoughtful and restrained. No continuous New Labour-bashing, no personal attacks. Cameron is never going to get away from the Tory Toff moniker but that is something he cannot help. It is a pity that a number of the left-leaning (as if New Labour was a left wing party anymore) posts on this and other blogs cannot make objective observations without the need for entering into a class war. If he should win the election, and if he should fail BECAUSE he is seen as a Tory Toff, then that is a different matter, but there is no doubt right now who is the more visionary party leader and it is appropriate that the British people give him a chance to turn the country round. Lord knows, we know what will happen if the current Government is allowed to continue in power for a few more years, let alone for the few months remaining until the election

  • Comment number 55.

    8. braveSouter
    Will today's speech by the Tory leader be regarded as the worst by any party leader in modern political history?


    Why limit it to modern politics? Although I believe the Emperor Commodus delivered some stinkers to the Senate in his time.

  • Comment number 56.

    "Actions are still more important than words"

    You got that right Souter. 100% spot on right.

    We've got 12 years of actions that speak for themselves. Those who are still undecided have seen all three main parties now... and it will shortly be make their mind up time.

  • Comment number 57.

    Nick. Not surprising Cameron is looking nervous given the mess he would inherit as prime minister. What you haven't allowed for, however, is that there would be no significant opposition after a conservative win, as labour will be tearing itself apart in a very bloody leadership contest for the next few months. That will keep you political commentators very busy.

  • Comment number 58.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 59.

    the world, but we deal with them as best as we can, and in our own way!
    Citizens and tax payers worldwide had to guarantee 15 Trillion US dollars in government support to save their economies from collapsing.
    Not one mentioning of the mad excesses in the banking sector and not one critique of his friends and supporter in the 'City of London'.
    This 'omission' tells everyone where he thinks the power lies and who he does not want to confront seriously.
    Are we really all equal and in it together? Not according to Cameron's speech. He 'forgot' to spell out his plan how to mend the biggest,
    worst malfunction of all in our 'broken society', which has almost bankrupted the UK: the immoral, reckless and corrupt 'City of London'.
    Much to the delight of Murdoch and Ashcroft, the two non-UK residents who seem to have more influence over the Conservatives
    than UK citizens, the two billionaires who Cameron wants to please most. Equal treatment for all?
    Please read more about the biggest necessity of all, which is more important for a fairer society than the from Leeds. They set up Business in Manchester Derby road in 1894 the business grew from there. Many other leading Iconic business Partnerships also started in Manchester like Rolls & Royce. M and S certainly had nothing to do with the East End research research research.

    Top class well balanced speech from Mr Cameron looks as if Manchester has spawned another great partnership the Conservatives and the public in accountable traditional British communities, thanks to Tory gross mismanagement of the economy, the destruction of our industrial wealth, when we did not have any hint of a GLOBAL financial disaster, as we have today?

    Why did Cameron mention his family? Does he want to know what it is about trying to care for a severely disabled son who is now 30 and at the same time going to work? Misfortunes happen to a lot of peopleIconic business Partnerships also started in Manchester like Rolls & Royce. M and S certainly had nothing to do with the East End research research research.
    Yes, debt is very high, but for good reason, and them coming in slashing spending after 100 days will have us back in recession, heading for a depression - and people are starting to realise that.old enough to remember what happened last time the Tories were in power. Contrary to the image of tragedy that you would clearly like to generate, the economy ran well, people had jobs, food, houses, cars, the NHS worked fairly eficiently, as did education, nationally we paid off debt and, as we gradually rid ourselves of the weight of the disaster of the previous Labour government, we mostly got richer.

    Blahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.................................




  • Comment number 60.

    52

    Disgraceful post.

    Noone wants to hear you criticise someone for talking about his personal pain. Grow up, get perspective, but most importantly, do not fling excrement where reasonable and sensitive human beings might have to put up with it.

    Rarely get so riled I feel the need to post in language that would be modded, but you don't deserve to breath the same air as the rest of us.

  • Comment number 61.

    #6 - duckoff -

    "He looked and sounded like a lightweight."

    What does a "lightweight" look like? Please enlighten me.

    Hairstyle? Shape of nose? Size of ears? What exactly??

    I'm intrigued...

    (Or is this the level that political analysis has descended to in 21st Century Britain?)

  • Comment number 62.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 63.

    23. At 5:21pm on 08 Oct 2009, braveSouter wrote:
    His speech was about as inspirational as a wet weekend in Manchester.
    ----
    Have to stand up for Manchester here, against those lazy stereotypes: some of my best wet weekends were spent as an undergrad in Manchester - it's a great city.

    One thing that I remember vividly from that time is seeing rats tearing at bags in mountainous heaps of uncollected rubbish in the city centre. This was during Callaghan's winter of discontent and should have been enough to seal labour's fate forever. Unfortunately people have short memories and we got amateur hour all over again. Let's hope people remember how dreadful this lot have been for the country and make sure that they never get voted in again.

  • Comment number 64.

    Who complained about the handle 'BovineBuffoon', and why?

  • Comment number 65.

    Chaps,

    One thing to share with you on reflection. This was also different as David Cameron left the announcements of policy to his team. This contrasts totally with Gordon Brown - he always has to make the annoucements, he is like a child seeking attention. Me...look what I have done...the rest of the Cabinet [bar PM of course] just sits around and is given little things to talk about.

    This is centralised power [Blair perfected it] and now David Cameron by his speech and the way the conference was run is showing another way. Ministers should control their portfolios NOT Number 10. When he was Chancellor Brown controlled spending and Blair was to weak to stop him. This is a very different approach...bring it on....an election please as soon as can be done. We need change and David Cameron sealed it with me today.

  • Comment number 66.

    Nick

    Sorry for the pun in advance, but has the Czech President "check-mated" the EU Commission over the Lisbon Treaty by asking for a two line sentence to be inserted at the bottom of the document?

    As I understand it the treaty would have to be re-ratified all over again by the member states if this were to happen.

    PS Sensible speech by Cameron - the contents of the tin matched the description on the tin's label. The days when conference speeches meant something special are long gone, modern communication systems have seen to that. Why the lab and lib drones are getting their knickers in a twist is a bit mystifying.

  • Comment number 67.

    22. At 5:19pm on 08 Oct 2009, Justin150 wrote:
    Despite being a tory I am not impressed. There is a consistent unwillingness to give the full story and this conference has been undermined by seriously inept policy announcements eg:
    1. Pension age to rise to 66 soon, the next day oops we didnt mean it for women.
    2. Cameron pre-conference on 50% tax band said if it didnt raise any money it wouldnt be retained - Osbourne at conference we are keeping the 50% band (it still will not raise any money as you have been repeatedly told)
    3. Total announced savings £7bn, with maybe another £8-10bn due the pension change - amount of govt spending we need to cut is probably around £100 bn a year. Good start but you need to be much bolder
    4. Slashing MOD civil servants by 25%. There are almost as many civil servants (85,000) as there are active members of the armed forces (99,000). Lets be generous and assume the actual ratio of bureaucrats to armed forces is 2:3 in other countries it is 1:3 or even 1:5 so it is not a 25% cut you should be aiming for but a 60% cut - of course private sector companies head office is even leaner than this, they would probably run the armed forces with under 5000 civil servants.

    **********************************************************************

    1, If you watched George Osbourne speech in full, he said clearly, men 2016, women 2020... next day was trying to explain to journo's who are hard of hearing.

    2, George Osbourne made it clear he did not want to keep the 50% tax as it will be a deterrent to growth, but because 'we are all in this together' felt it would not be right to reduce tax whilst he is asking the public sector above £18,000 to take a pay freeze for 1 year. could you imagine the uproar, only for the rich yadiyadiyadi.

    3, George Osbourne made it clear, that he was giving a sample of what needs to be done, but that many 10's of £1000's will have to be found through, cutting ID cards, data bases, whitehall etcetc. long hard task eh.

    4, yep i agree, but at least both Osbourne and Cameron have pledged the right noises for our armed services in theatre, seems they're on the right track, especially with General Dannett.

    And what i do like about Tory supporters/voters they are task masters, they will criticise and they wont let their party get away with bullsh*t, unlike labour's lot.
    It wasn't the strongest of speeches i agree, but trust me it has really appealed to women in particular (none socialist of course ;o)), it was known beforehand that he would not be talking in depth policies, as the relevant shadow ministers throughout the conference have done that, it was more a showcase of tory values, I think.

    still there still 6mths to go i think, i hope, people's common sense will prevail.

  • Comment number 68.

    Nick,

    Today was David Cameron's big chance and he blew it. His strategist and scriptwriter deserves a kick up the backside. Let me give my thoughts on 3 elements of his speech:

    1. To play part politics with Afghanistan is a low blow and although The Sun thinks this is an election winner they are wrong. When Russia were a superpower they could not defeat Afghanistan; America are now the only superpower in our world and they are struggling to defeat Afghanistan. Britain were always going to struggle in Afghanisatan and the ordinary person on the street is aware of this. This is a war we have to fight but victory was always going to be extremely difficult and the outspoken General has now shown his motives were political.

    2. The Tories can rebrand all they like but it is impossible for them to rebrand themselves as the 'party of the poor'. No sane person would believe this to be true.

    3. Tony Blair's performance as PM ended the day of voters being persuaded by personality. Ordinary people are worried about how they are going to survive and stay in a job; put food on the table and bring up their children. The ordinary voter is no longer seduced by personality as they gave Tony Blair the mandate to live the dream but he left us all disullioned whilst he becomes the richest ex-PM in history within 2 years.

    David you need a new scriptwriter and strategist as you have the tools but keep making the wrong moves. Gordon Brown is the weakest leader you could possibly come up against and it is taking an eternity to see him off. We were promised the Tory Conference would be all about them but they ended up referring to Labour all over the place and to name Gordon Brown, Tony Blair and Ed Balls in your speech was ill-advised at best.

    Today was meant to be about you. The Sun put the pressure on David Cameron last week and he has shown he cannot handle the mantle and pressures of leading the country. The Tories are going to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.

  • Comment number 69.

    braveSouter

    What exactly about you is brave? (and what's a souter?)

  • Comment number 70.

    Bravesouter post 23

    May I suggest you try living up to your name and be brave rather than bitter.

    First

    Manchester is very inspirational especially on a wet weekend.
    From M and S, Rolls Royce, First passenger station in the world, splitting atoms, AV Roe, first computers, just to mention a few of Britain’s, no the worlds greatest creations and all inspired by Manchester which now boasts the largest University in Europe.

    Which brings me to education matters you raise, if you gave every place in Eaton to a poor child you would educate about a hundred and fifty children a year no one would even notice the difference

    I might suggest you stop building argument on empty gestures what may be a better thing to do is take the qualities of Eaton to all the other schools in the land and educate every child to the best possible standard. Stop being jealous and do something to help all children not try and negotiate a place for a dozen lucky kids we have to work things up to the best not drag things down to the lowest.

    a good guide is:-

    Criticise the under performance not the best performers but when you have identified and criticised then help themto be better or say nothing.

  • Comment number 71.

    Not sure what Nick means by looking nervous; to me the speach was well presented. We have all known for a long time that Cameron was a gifted public speaker (especially when compared to Brown) and today just confirmed that. Nearing the end he was struggling for voice, but then the speach did last an hour.

    On content - I liked the tone. It was a very serious speach and set out the important policy issues as recurring themes; for example caring for those in need, but reintroducing personal responsibility.

    I've certainly never agreed with every policy of a political party, but in terms of individual politicians I believe that Cameron shares my values (family, small government, personal responsibility) in a way Brown never did.

  • Comment number 72.

    3. At 6:01pm on 08 Oct 2009, bertrambird wrote:
    I am puzzled by the strange torrent of abusive comments in the initial response to this blog. Nothing very positive - just abusive. I didn't hear the speech, as I have a job,, but I read the report. It seems Mr Cameron put together a reasonably coherent set of messages. Much as I would expect.

    Why the torrent of abuse? Are there rooms full of professional anti-bloggers sitting ready with texts to cut and paste into BBC blog streams as soon as they open? I suppose there must be. An army of Liba and Labs to attack this week, and an army of Labs and Cons last week.

    ===

    Yes, and collectively they are known as Mike_Naylor!

  • Comment number 73.

    Nick I wonder if you can confirm whether DC was unwell and dosed up on sudefed, as reported on Political Betting, just wondered, could explain a few thing's.

  • Comment number 74.

    Sagamix

    You still hiding behind your sofa? It's safe to come out now. The big bad scary man has left the stage.

    btw yes, please tell

  • Comment number 75.

    I noted three things from Cameron's speech (and in fact the whole Tory conference).

    The rhetoric (like the 'big government' stuff). Nothing new there.

    The detail. This is where, for the first time since 1997, the Tories came up with some viable ideas to govern the country. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) their detailed plans are not that far removed from Labour's plans.

    What they tried to keep quiet on. Especially the Conservative stance on Europe and the Lisbon Treaty. Because there isn't one.

    Overall, by Tory standards, it was a great speech, and a great conference. But only by Tory standards.

  • Comment number 76.

    This is a first for me but even so, I'm now going to defend DisgustedOfMitcham2's earlier post.

    The last time the Conservatives were in power they used the new North Sea oil revenues to fund their pipe-dreams so instead of saving this money and using it to ensure the long term funding of education, training & essential infrastructure they wasted it all on tax cuts for the rich and "free-market reforms" (actually no such thing but that was how they sold it to the masses).

    We saw hospital waiting times increase to over 2 years for many different procedures.

    Many people were working for a pittance.

    Millions of jobs were exported.

    Schools, universities, hospitals & other state owned institutions were left to rot (literally).

    All of the utilities were sold off at a fraction of their true value and with insufficient regulation to prevent the profiteering, lack of competition & under-investment we've seen since.

    There was rioting on the streets of many of our cities.

    The Police were completely politicised and regularly used against the people, totally destroying the relationship between the people and the Police.

    Everywhere outside of the South East of England was pretty much abandoned, their industries destroyed and little or no effort made to regenerate these areas or to create new job opportunities.

    The financial sector was very badly regulated and the seeds of the endowment crash were sown by everyone's favourite Tory, Ken Clarke. Not to mention Black Wednesday.

    Millions of council houses were sold off but instead of using the profits to build more, they did everything possible to stop local authorities from replacing theirs. This lead to millions of people being forced into unregulated private rented accommodation, increasing the costs to the tax-payer as most of their rent bills were being paid by us. This was also the main driving force behind the housing market boom that has resulted in houses becoming unaffordable to most young people and the inevitable sub-prime fiasco, collapse in savings & the general disarray in the financial sector (in the UK, obviously not the US).

    I could go on at length but I hope I've made the point that things were no better, and in many cases much worse, under the last Conservative government. The very last thing we need now is a return to their inept style of governance.

    The only thing the Conservatives have got right is that it is now time for change, unfortunately electing them will not give us a change, not in any meaningful sense anyway. New Labour simply carried on from where Major's government left off and Cameron would merely carry on from where Gordon Brown has left us, there will be no significant changes.

    It is time for a real change, instead of the usual suspects of central office candidates being parachuted into your area how about you actually vote for someone who represents your area and your views ?
    Don't let the parties keep in power, kick them all out and make a significant change to all of our lives by voting for real people who have not sold their soul to their parties or their financiers.

    Better still, get involved in a local candidates campaign or stand for election yourself.

    Labour and the Conservatives are just two sides of the same coin, the picture may change when you flip it but no matter how many times you do, you always end up with the same one.

  • Comment number 77.

    An excellent speech , which I actually enjoyed.
    Pity I will be voting for a different Scottish party, because I was impressed.

    52 You are a fool.
    Mr Cameron certainly did not labour the death of his son and anyone with a grain of decency would not have posted such a puerile comment.
    I have saved a copy.

  • Comment number 78.

    Today was all about not doing a, "Kinnock." I think DC got it just about right. He set out his vision for the country. There was no point in him listing promise after promise, as he knows full well the money isn`t there is pay for them. Instead he gave a good outline of the direction he wants to go in. He got the mood about just right. There`s a long way to go yet and a win is still not in the bag - so its a case of steady as she goes.

    However, it was very pleasing to see so many young people at a party political conference, taking a real interest in the issues of the day. Youngsters today are all to often criticised by the media for their bad behaviour, clubbing and getting outrageously drunk every weekend. Here, we had significant numbers of well turned out, well informed young people trying to do their best for the party they have chosen to support. A great pity the media did not focus in on this. Bad behaviour is news; but not good behaviour it seems.

  • Comment number 79.

    @52
    It is not play, it is life, i imagine, if he hadn't mentioned his son people like you would probably criticise him for showing no emotion or saying he got over that quickly or something equally derogative, what you seem unable to comprehend is this is a man that wants to be the PM of our country, I/we need to see and know as much as possible, what it is that drives him, his personality, what he is intellectually, emotionally and physically capable of.
    why i am bothering to respond to pond life i dont know. nope i am not a very compassionate conservative in this case.

  • Comment number 80.

    68. At 6:41pm on 08 Oct 2009, PolitcalCentrist wrote:
    Nick,

    Today was David Cameron's big chance and he blew it. His strategist and scriptwriter deserves a kick up the backside. Let me give my thoughts on 3 elements of his speech:
    *******************************
    On the contrary. As someone who did give Tony Blair my vote last time, but rapidly wished I hadn't, my vote has been up for grabs.
    Today's speech has almost - but not quite - secured my vote. If the details match the headlines when we get to hear rhem, Cameron is on the right track.

  • Comment number 81.

    Two images were stuck in my head throughout this speach

    1 - Cameron on a bike, being followed by a car with his work in it
    2 - Cameron downing £150 bottles of champers at a party during a conference which his party is talking about "hard times for us all"

    Nothing in his speach address the root cause of either of these issuse, the first being he is going to try and spin everything as much as TB did, if not more, and the second being the fact that "hard times for us all" means he may actually have to pay for his next sofa from his wages and not expense it!

    Cameron's policies will impact the hardest on millions of the poorest in our society, most of his chums will probably simply have to get rid of one of their butlers! When you actaully look at the cuts they are going to make, the money this will save it is no-where near enough, so either he can't do maths, or he's not telling us what he really has instore, either way, He's the last person I'd want as PM.

  • Comment number 82.

    68. At 6:41pm on 08 Oct 2009, PolitcalCentrist wrote:
    When Russia were a superpower they could not defeat Afghanistan;
    -----
    The fact that the Americans and others were covertly funding the other side might have had a bearing upon it.

  • Comment number 83.


    Presumably it is nerve wracking for you Nick as it has been clear that you have been working as hard as you can for a Tory Government. have you been promised a job yet? I do have to laugh after 12 years of the right, yourself included, whinging about Labour spin, that their, and your hopes are invested in a PR man!!

  • Comment number 84.

    53 bertrambird

    "Why the torrent of abuse? Are there rooms full of professional anti-bloggers sitting ready with texts to cut and paste into BBC blog streams as soon as they open? I suppose there must be."

    =====================
    Yes there are, some seem to do it professionally, and under multiple names so its nowhere near as bad as it would appear.

    Take mike_naylor for example - his name is an anagram, of Liar_Monkey.

  • Comment number 85.

  • Comment number 86.

    8 bravesouter

    "Will today's speech by the Tory leader be regarded as the worst by any party leader in modern political history?"

    ==================================================

    You weren't watching TV last week then ........

  • Comment number 87.

    As a speech - it was long on description (you could not call it analysis) but there was just no how. A good example, but by no means the only one, was when he described the plight of a woman in the poverty trap whose marginal rate of tax would be 96% (I think) on every pound if she took up work. This is a really really important issue to highlight - but it has been highlighted for 40 years, what he did not say was what he proposed to do about it. How he was going to change things - not one idea or promise. A real missed opportunity. If his party really are to shake the nasty party tag and then they need to really show how they will be more noblesse oblige than laissez faire.

    It has to be said this was a weak speech bereft of passion, policy, or clear vision, although it is a very difficult balancing act - the ming vase and all that. After what has been a very difficult but not disastrous weak for his party he will have to hope that the Darling Pre budget report will be very damaging for the government or I think Cameron will only get a small majority or maybe even a hung parliament.

    If either of the parities can put together a clear strategy on growth they will clean up -

  • Comment number 88.

    26. At 5:26pm on 08 Oct 2009, rjaggar wrote:

    Is this the same human rights that give the perpetrater more rights than the victimn in broken Britain, prisoners of H.M. prisons rights to live as if in a hotel, I only hope if the tories make it goverment they keep their pledge of dumping this garbage.

  • Comment number 89.

    The Government have mismanaged the economy and if ever there is a reasonn to get a Government out, apart from the long list of lies, the reneging on promises, the hypocrisy, champagne socialism and an untrustworthy and embarrassing prime minister, that's it.

  • Comment number 90.

    @68 politic central

    2. The Tories can rebrand all they like but it is impossible for them to rebrand themselves as the 'party of the poor'. No sane person would believe this to be true.
    *****************************************************************
    unlike the nulabour party who did a real good job of being the 'party of the rich' they forgot about the poor.

    big difference Tories are for all whether rich or poor,
    nu labour are just for themselves, they want to use the poor to cause a division.

    i write nu labour because at least back in the day old labour were genuinely for the working/under class, and were principled in their division.


  • Comment number 91.

    74. At 6:49pm on 08 Oct 2009, InModeration wrote:
    Sagamix

    You still hiding behind your sofa? It's safe to come out now. The big bad scary man has left the stage.
    ***********************************

    Saga's probably gone to the library to look up additional superlatives to use when describing Cameron's brilliant spech.

  • Comment number 92.

    At this moment, the betting odds given by betting companies are 1.08 for Conservative and 8 for Labour to win the next General Election. This is about real money and not just personal opinions / comments / polls. Nick, would you put a load of your money on Labour to support your saying that most people could easily be proved wrong in this case?

  • Comment number 93.

    The speech of a true lightweight. No answers, no solutions & the same old rhetoric from comedy Dave. Tragically vague on detail and completely bereft of answers to the big issues.

    Gordon Brown this, Gordon Brown that. Get on with winning over voters Dave, instead of shooting down Gordon.

  • Comment number 94.

    greatHayemaker and #60.

    Re, " ...disgraceful post." and "..no one wants to 'hear' (aye?) you criticise someone for talking about his personal pain."

    Well, that is your opinion.

    Personally, I am one who does not want to 'hear' a speech by a man who wants to be Prime Minister in which he uses his and his wife's truly tragic personal loss as a part of an Electioneering campaign.

    Nothing gets me more "riled" than this kind of duplicitous heart-on-sleeve appeal - - listen/read the excerpt again, it is not me, but Cameron who relates it as a reason for his going on - - the my pain is so great I am sure I can share all your pains too approach! Urgh! Double urgh!

    I will not use any language except that of my normal adverse reaction to someone who is pushing their feelings onto the rest of the community for their own ends.
    No, I am sorry, you find my remarks so reprehensible, but I will not withdraw them particularly as I categorised that part of the speech alongside Brown's 'kirk parents' and drew the contrast with the inordinate dignity and suffering of another couple whose grief is certainly comparable if not greater.

    In my honest opinion that element of the speech was uncalled for in its method of delivery. Had Mr Cameron restricted his self to stating 2009 would be memorable for one personal thing only I would have remained quiet; he chose to broaden out that entirely understandable and undoubted 'grief' to go on to partially justify his continued Political involvement. That was uncalled for and should not have happened.

  • Comment number 95.

    Colleagues, the nice sentiments and serious aspirations expressd in Cameron's speech are sadly not enough.
    As long as fundamentaly wrong structures in the financial world allow a small group of self-serving, reckless, unethical money men to push the world economy to the brink of disaster and burden YOU, the dear UK taxpayers, with a decade of reduced income, reduced pensions and higher taxes, all the other reforms matter only to a certain extent.
    I hope Cameron one day will understand that he needs to tackle structural problems in the financial system first of all. I remain sceptic however. People like Cameron and Osborne have, sadly, a great amount of patience for people from their own background, even if they have created the greatest eonomic crisis in 80 years. They think it is easier to scold some benefit fraudsters and show how tough they can be in sorting out a few Quangos. I will change my opinion the day Cameron seriously criticises the reckless capitalist consumer culture promoted by billionaire friend Ruport Murdoch and when he criticises the tax evasion schemes of his own boss: the Deputy-Chairman of the Tory party and billionaire Lord Ashcroft. By the way, did Lord Ascroft attend the Tory party conference? I did not see him in any media report. Is Lord Ashcroft considered to be too politically incorrect and off message? Do the Tories take his money but don't want to be seen with him on TV?

  • Comment number 96.

    #28 dotconnect dotconnect wrote:
    2010: UK ditches tired and incompetent Labour and votes Tory.
    2018: UK ditches tired and incompetent Tories and votes Labour.
    2026: UK ditches tired and incompetent Labour and votes Tory.
    2034: UK ditches tired and incompetent Tories and votes Labour.
    etc...
    When will this cycle end? When will we learn?

    Isn't this is the essence of our democracy. Governments are voted out, rather than opposition parties voted in. Given time, every party in power falls prey to arrogance, hubris, allowing the pedulum to swing too far etc and the electorate decide their time is up - for now. In essence, the same is true of countries with different voting systems and coalition governments.

    Just as well you might think, on reflection. Heaven help us if there were enough die-hard Labour or Tory voters to keep either party in perpetuity.

    The Tories victory under Thatcher was as needed as its demise under Major was overdue. Labour's victory under Blair was as needed as its demise under Brown is certainly overdue.

    If the Tories 'win' the next election, it will be to do with the real and perceived falings of Labour and Brown rather then the appeal of Tory policies or Cameron as leader. He could blow it and delay the change - as Kinnock improbably mangaged in 1992. His speech today avoided that - small praise, but probably all that was required. Mind you - plenty of time yet.

  • Comment number 97.

    I see the brothers are wetting themselves again! And re # 68 - you seem to be like the 'green' activists who oppose everything which is designed to keep the lights on, but never come up with a better actual alternative! Oh, I forgot, wind farms! Maybe I should equip my great grandchildren with night vision goggles!

  • Comment number 98.

    I thought it was a decent speech. Those who grumble about the 'how' can wait for the manifesto. At the moment the speech gave enough signals about navigation.

    Labour has botched so many things - (law and order, education, not dealing with the poverty trap - defence spending - it goes on and on - NHS doctors pay etc etc) over the past 12 years that a change is desparately needed.

  • Comment number 99.

    tisfedup and #79.

    Hmm, "..why I am bothering to respoind to pond life I don't know..."

    And you think that sort of 'compassionate' rhetoric plus your own invective is likely to win over the doubters!?

    Think again.



  • Comment number 100.

    I wasn't surprised he mentioned the death of his son. It was obviously a big thing to happen in his year and his life. Losing a child is possibly the worst thing that can happen to you, there's no reason why he shouldn't mention it.

 

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