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Prospects for Thursday, 20 March

  • Newsnight
  • 20 Mar 08, 10:45 AM

Robert Morgan is today's programme producer - here's his early email.

Good morning everyone,

There are a few strong stories around today. The City stories are well worth pursuing. Mervyn King meets the CEOs of the big banks to discuss financial guarantees and there's the extraordinary rogue traders story.

The Tibet demos have spread to two more provinces in China.

Oscar-winning British actor Sir Paul Scofield has just died.

Sarkozy's France
We have a film from Allan Little and Sara. Next week French President Nicolas Sarkozy makes a state visit to Britain with his new wife Carla Bruni. Sarko's had a difficult few months following negative publicity around his private life and bad election results for his centre-right party in the final round of nationwide local elections. Allan travels through the South of France for Newsnight to find out what the people of France think of Sarkozy's presidency and his policies.


Do come to the morning meeting with great ideas on how to do these or any other stories. Any playout ideas welcome.

Robert

Comments  Post your comment

  • 1.
  • At 01:28 PM on 20 Mar 2008,
  • Cloe wrote:

Can we hear a little about Credit Suisse Q1 losses and Allianz' woes: market traders lying about the extent of their losses, sending banks into financial turmoil... sounds like a Grisham thriller waiting to happen.

  • 2.
  • At 01:28 PM on 20 Mar 2008,
  • Bob Goodall wrote:

Dear Newsnight

I'm confused, one of the debts of the Nation is trillion and a half pounds,

is there an intention to repay all of this, if so how and when, or is the idea that in time with inflation it will reduce in value? or is the reality that we are now so far in the soup that those in charge don't know what to do and are merely hoping the storm doesn't break on their watch?

when you question the Bank of England and Government over the economy is there any chance you could convert some of this into a question?

or if the questions are too hard for VIP guests on Newsnight, they won't appear?

I think there is unfortunately a basis for some bloggers comments that Newsnight may be pulling it's punches in exchange for getting some quests onto the show?

best wishes though to you all, the show is excellent and I know you were very hard indeed to put it together, and on a tight budget, thank you to you all,

Bob

  • 3.
  • At 03:14 PM on 20 Mar 2008,
  • Jeanette Eccles .London wrote:

Playout on the "Which " survey and therefore no gussett anxiety for Sir Stuart Rose

  • 4.
  • At 04:56 PM on 20 Mar 2008,
  • John wrote:

Could you explore why banks that pay billions in bonuses & share dividends and have recently made record profits, are asking for government (tax payers) subsidy via the Bank of England? Any monies lent to these companies should be to circumvent short term liquidity problems only, yet the impression given today is that they would like the BoE to be liable for the risk.

It should also be noted that the BoE is not like the Fed, which is a privately owned body and therefore shouldn't be asked to provide the same underwriting service that the banks have in the USA. I believe an explanation of what the Fed actually is would help understand the situation immensely.

BROKEN ON THE WHEEL

There is a terrible poignancy about Tibet’s undoing; it has resonance with the Kogi of the High Andes. These are peoples who value BEING, above DOING; brought low from their respective high places by the wheeled dwellers in the swamplands of modernity. I can clearly envision that look of impatient contempt on the face of David Miliband, where he confronted with my words, and can hear the fluid, empty glibness of his politically measured response. Britain, and her usurpatory holders of high office, see the world in monetary terms only. There is no place in their global game for players who would play by less materialistic rules. It only remains to ponder whether Tibetan culture will fade before, or after, our cultural vacuum implodes.

BROKEN ON THE WHEEL

There is a terrible poignancy about Tibet’s undoing; it has resonance with the Kogi of the High Andes. These are peoples who value BEING, above DOING; brought low from their respective high places by the wheeled dwellers in the swamplands of modernity. I can clearly envision that look of impatient contempt on the face of David Miliband, where he confronted with my words, and can hear the fluid, empty glibness of his politically measured response. Britain, and her usurpatory holders of high office, see the world in monetary terms only. There is no place in their global game for players who would play by less materialistic rules. It only remains to ponder whether Tibetan culture will fade before, or after, our cultural vacuum implodes.

  • 7.
  • At 05:55 PM on 20 Mar 2008,
  • Bedd Gelert wrote:

You may not have time on a busy show, but the outcome of this immigration case, and the asinine comments by Alun Michael MP [an ex-First Minister for Wales, heaven spare us] in the face of warnings by Mrs Neil Kinnock that this woman was in effect facing a 'death sentence' by being deported during her treatment for cancer, surely deserves some airtime.

https://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/7190720.stm

https://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/7306345.stm

The death of this poor woman is a sad indictment of a Government that is so concerned with the presentation of a 'tough' policy on immigration [surely 'firm but fair'? Ed ] to cover up the fact that it has completely failed to have an effective 'managed migration' policy.

A footballer was recently successful after a campaign to get an extension to his visa - this woman was not. But he was young, healthy and wealthy - this poor woman was poor, older and unhealthy. She didn't stand a chance.

  • 8.
  • At 10:21 PM on 20 Mar 2008,
  • David Hartfield wrote:

A question too far...


To Bob G. I`d say no way will the Beeb pose the question on the true cause of the sickness of money that we call inflation.

They only invite disciples of Keynes who of course said in the long term we are dead implying that he knew his policies would cause inflation eventually. The fed is careful to limit media coverage on this as it works with the world`s central banks to help it out.(Those who use the internet for news will know the BBC can only scratch the surface of issues raised daily in the empire.)

The banks like debt since each loan they make becomes an asset on which a strange charge can be added called interest.When loans are repaid these assets on the banks books are simply cancelled which means no more interest.

The government likes debt.Since debt also equals money. Debt keeps people at work paying for goods and services and TAX. Those in debt are fearful of losing their jobs so unemployment is held down and wage rises restrained. Debt means the economy expandsm, profits grow,trade increases and so does TAX.

|For the govt.increasing wages equals bad inflation but asset price inflation eg. house price inflation equals good inflation.Oh and of course more TAX.

Finally, inflation is the means by which debt is eroded over time. Or put another way inflation is another form of TAX. The greatest beneficiaries of inflation are of course governments who pay yesteryears debts with todays inflated TAX receipts.

And we go round and round in the circle game.

  • 9.
  • At 11:09 PM on 20 Mar 2008,
  • picasso wrote:

what did shemean whenshesaid iquote "minushy" at least it didnt follow up with an umm

What a woeful excuse for an interview last night. A Dalai Lama's lead propagandist a trendy journo promoting his altest effort and a simpering anchor woman. Since when exactly did the BBC become the Propaganda unit of Free Tibet?

Could it possible be that this so called "Cultural Genocide" is simply ordinary Tibetans throwing off superstition and backwardness and willingly joining the world and having no further need for the Dalai Lama, and the nepotistic clique humouressly entitle "Government in Exile". The Rioters on Friday were vicious, back street yobs, but you totally failed to mention the victims they murdered (I have seen the graphic pictures of the aftermath which you have not broadcast) or force your guests to condemn the actions. I wonder if the rioters were Palestinian and the victims Jewish, whether you would have been so sanguine about the matter?

We hear so much about Oppression and Discrimination but never is there one shred of specific instance or evidence to support these allegations, its simply another mantra!

No doubt about it, a new low in the standards of State Broadcasting.

  • 11.
  • At 04:56 PM on 22 Mar 2008,
  • Baz wrote:

If you want a specific shred of evidence of oppression Keith.
What about this?:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/theeditors/2008/03/denied_access.html

I'm sure you are right though, China is a utopian society where everyone gets along and the Tibetan protesters are just a nasty bunch.

  • 12.
  • At 09:41 AM on 24 Mar 2008,
  • David Nettleton wrote:

I've just had a second look at the footage and can see no evidence of 'simpering', which according to my dictionary is ' smiling in a coy and silly way'.

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