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Is enough being done to end disability discrimination?

11:51 UK time, Monday, 29 November 2010

It's 40 years since the first Disability Act was passed, giving rights to disabled people for the first time. But has enough been done?

The legislation encapsulated ideas such as help at home, the right to proper assessment of needs and crucially making it the responsibility of local councils to make the environment accessible to disabled people.

However, a new BBC survey has revealed that although 90% of those polled believed government should provide funds to make the workplace accessible for the disabled, 40% thought that people with disabilities turned down jobs, even when they were physically able to do them.

Do disability services need to be improved? Is disability discrimination still a problem? Do you have a personal experience to share?

Thank you for your comments. This debate is now closed.

Comments

Page 1 of 4

  • Comment number 1.

    Working in construction you can really see how new buildings are designed these days to accommodate those who have disabilities. Therefore I'd say things have moved in the right direction regarding this issue.

  • Comment number 2.

    This is probably more about perceptions than facts. People THINK that disabled people have turned down jobs. What does that really mean?

    I think as with normal benefits, if there is no increase in the standard of living from getting a job, then people will not actively look for work or accept jobs that they are offered. But the information above doesnt say one way or the other if this is the case or not.

  • Comment number 3.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 4.

    As a disabled person i find that most laws are there for the sake of keeping people like myself quiet?When i go shopping most stores dont enforce their disabled parking spaces which leave people like myself open to abuse from these inconsiderate drivers who think disabled people should not have parking spaces.And the stores and shops dont give a dam .The public in general dont respect disabled people because laws are not enforced to protect us.

  • Comment number 5.

    If someone is genuinely disabled then help and consideration should be given. However what constitutes as being disabled nowadays is a different matter. Far too many people claim to be disabled when in fact they are able to work and provide for themselves. It is yet another leg of the welfare state that has been abused

  • Comment number 6.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 7.

    In answer to Ace Rileys comment, most disabled people seem to think the welfare state is there for there sole benefit only. I feel sorry for anyone who is disabled but am afraid it’s a fact of life, and people need to make the best of what they have and not keep complaining about how bad there lot is. I believe that the vast majority do respect and help disabled people when they can, but sometimes disabled people won’t help themselves

  • Comment number 8.

    Is enough being done to end disability discrimination? In some ways it's gone over the top. For example, when I drive into my local City on a Saturday, it's hard to find a parking space, yet there literally hundreds and hundreds of empty disabled and mother + baby bays in the city's car parks.

  • Comment number 9.

    NO if you have health issue's like me there is no help
    on visiting the employment exchange 30 years ago i explained that i was partilly sighted,
    i was told how can a person be partially sighted when they only have 1 eye the other being plastic so it did not count as an eye?
    now still with 1 eye and heart attack triple bypass still not disabled
    after having heart ops i worked in the voluntary sector for over 5 years working at least 40 hours plus aweek when offered full time work with a good wage THATS RIGHT my health issues lost me the job so for some people
    they turn there backs on still no help and for those that feel i am a scronger NO financial benefits either

  • Comment number 10.

    Things seemed to have moved a long way in the right direction.

    No doubt more can and should be done, but buildings, vehicles and most importantly attitudes seem to have changed.

    I'd like to see more detail about the poll the BBC is quoting. I can easily imagine that some disabled people do turn jobs down. Why wouldn't they? Everyone else does, if the job isn't right.

    More importantly, though, many people do no doubt think that there are many people claiming to be disabled who just aren't. There have been plenty of court cases, so it's not just ill-founded hearsay.

    Those who are genuinely disabled and can't work should be able to live well on benefits. Those who are disabled who can work should work, and society and the economy should help them.

    But there is no more or less reason why disabled people should be more inclined to take unsuitable employment than anyone else.

  • Comment number 11.

    3. At 12:14pm on 29 Nov 2010, scotty1694 wrote:
    not every disabled person can work but id bet 80% could

    so long as you can use your head and move your arms you can work.
    maybe start training people in wheelchairs on CAD and other computer related tasks?

    and just because somebody is "simple" doesnt mean they couldnt work in a factory intellegence isnt required in every job.


    so really unless you are Severly disabled you can work.

    i also fail to see why disabled people get free cars

    do they not realise all they do is just rent these cars out and put more money in there pockets? they could probably recall all these free cars or discounted cars and use the money to hire people to do the shopping for them?

    and as for people disabled with "stress and depression" get real!
    you think in ww2 the troops said woah i cant fight today im stressed and depressed! or chefs or mechanics?

    far to many people abuse the system with stress and depression and "made up handicaps"

    __________________________________________________________________

    Are you for real!? I am one of those people who get "free cars". I use an electric wheelchair and have a converted vehicle where I can stay in my chair when travelling. As for your suggestion that I should give up my car and get people to do my shopping for me, well that would make me even more isolated than I already am.

    I also do not have paid work, but do voluntary work as and when I can, I enjoy it and give something back to society. I cannot physically go out to work as I have carers who help me and somedays I cant get out of bed or work, I couldnt get a flexible enough paid job at home so work for charities doing whatever they need me to do administration wise.

    I am constantly checked for benefits and assesed regulary as I am 28. Whilst I acknowledge some people swing the lead, I feel your comments are typical of society. Disability is not just about how that one person is at that point of time, it is how that person manages day to day. Please bear this is mind before you look down at us again!

  • Comment number 12.

    Quote / "3. At 12:14pm on 29 Nov 2010, scotty1694 wrote:

    also fail to see why disabled people get free cars

    do they not realise all they do is just rent these cars out and put more money in there pockets?
    they could probably recall all these free cars or discounted cars and use the money to hire people
    to do the shopping for them?" /End Quote

    The Cars are NOT FREE Disabled Drivers pay for them with there own Disability Living Allowance.
    Or in the case of service personel they pay from there Disabled perons War Pension

    I have a Car funded from my own DLA, why?

    Because I am unable to walk more than 25mtrs, and that same criterea
    applies to all persons entitled to obtain a car under the scheme. In some cases it is not the Driver who is the
    Disabled person, it may be there spouse/partner or Brother/Sister etc.

    That car enables me to work, and get on with my life, without it, I would be housebound and a burden to society.

    Your comment is Crass in the extreme, perhaps someone should "Beam You UP Scotty" back to the Planet you come from!

  • Comment number 13.

    4. At 12:16pm on 29 Nov 2010, ace riley wrote:
    As a disabled person i find that most laws are there for the sake of keeping people like myself quiet?When i go shopping most stores dont enforce their disabled parking spaces which leave people like myself open to abuse from these inconsiderate drivers who think disabled people should not have parking spaces.And the stores and shops dont give a dam .The public in general dont respect disabled people because laws are not enforced to protect us.

    ------------------

    maybe if disabled people didnt hand there handicap passes around to family and then constantly you see somebody geting out of a car with a handicap pass than can walk just as good as me , maybe we would get so annoyed?

    handicapped people hand there privelges about to there family and friends so alot of them only have themselfs to blame.


    and just what laws would you like made up and enforced for disabled people exactly?

    isnt discriminating against a disabled person illegal?

    what more laws could you want?

  • Comment number 14.

    Quote / " 5. At 12:22pm on 29 Nov 2010, roger wrote:

    If someone is genuinely disabled then help and consideration should be given. However what constitutes as being disabled nowadays is a different matter. Far too many people claim to be disabled when in fact they are able to work and provide for themselves. It is yet another leg of the welfare state that has been abused " /End Quote

    Yes and a LOT of them do work, your making a statement based on nothing but your own ignorance an prejudice.

  • Comment number 15.

    Whether meaning to or not I think that a large amount of the general public are blase about disabilities. Parking spaces seem to be a constant problem and many of the people who selfishly park in disabled bays when they are perfectly able bodied are rude and abusive when confronted about it. I have witnessed this myself many times as my mother has mobility problems and had a blue badge. Why? What is it to someone walking a slightly longer distance when they don't have to endure pain? To add to this, despite the DDA I still see many public places that are inaccessible for disabled people - shops with doorways, toilets up stairs, aisles too small to fit a wheelchair or scooter between them. It is no disadvantage to anyone to build ramps or widen shopping aisles, so why isn't it universally done?
    As for the comment about free or reduced cost cars, would you give your car away in lieu of getting a personal shopper? I thought not. Why deny people their independence and good quality of life just to save a few quid?

  • Comment number 16.

    Do disability services need to be improved? Is disability discrimination still a problem?

    I think it depends on how you look at it. I have no doubt that disabled applicant to jobs suffer discrimination...but both positive (box ticking) and negative.

    However, we live in a society with anti-discrimination laws. We also live in a socieety where somone with a disability can live respectably off of the state. SO we say that those with disabilities should not suffer discrimination...but also, once they have jumped through all the eligibility testing hoops, they get non means tested benefits for life.

    Strikes me as a doubee standard

  • Comment number 17.

    A great deal has been done and compared with many countries discrimination here is much less. The 40% who believe that disabled people turn down jobs are probably mostly readers of the DM. They constantly have these sort of stories

  • Comment number 18.

    I was discharged on medical grounds from the army several decades ago, when the sun still shone permanently on the British Empire, and was faced with the problem of finding a job. Although entitled to sign up on the disabled register, I was strongly advised not to do so, as that would have restricted the possibility of being offered work to practically zero. Things may not be perfect yet, but it seems we have come a long way forward since my experience. Luckily, I was able to find work that I could do, and never looked back. Not everyone is so fortunate.

  • Comment number 19.

    look at the job market then were the disabled could be used but are not
    hospitals
    employment exchange
    airports
    railway stations
    doctors
    housing
    courts jury duty
    cleansing
    advice centers
    office worker
    sucurity
    employment fraud investigaters
    use the disabled in the police coms etc
    but no these jobs are taken by fit people young or immigrants

  • Comment number 20.

    Quote / " However, a new BBC survey has revealed that although 90% of those polled believed government should provide funds to make the workplace accessible for the disabled, 40% thought that people with disabilities turned down jobs, even when they were physically able to do them.

    Do disability services need to be improved? Is disability discrimination still a problem? Do you have a personal experience to share? " / End Quote

    Ok as for the Jobs that Disabled persons allegedly turn down, how many of them pay enough so that they are actually better off, when you consider the Benefits they lose from working?

    I have experience of poor service and access provision for Disabled persons, half the public buildings Town Halls, Civic centres in the North of England are Victorian buildings or older, with steps into an out of them, often the only "disabled" entrance is a door at the back in some dingy unlit area that stinks of Urine and Vomit, and we are expected to be grateful to use it.

    Yet I was the person tasked with providing that access, but when I did make suggestions and put forward plans for alterations or provision, it was often turned down because it cost to much, or in the case of Sheffield Town Hall, it was turned down because English Heritage refused to allow the alterations as the Building is "Listed"

    Currently access to Sheffield Town Hall is provided via a ramp at the front, the ramp is too steep, has no respite point on it, lacks a handrail at the correct height and shares access to the building with pedestrians.

    But that's OK English Heritage can claim they have preserved the Town Hall.

  • Comment number 21.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 22.

    Dare not saying about the disabled without getting my head bitten off!

    I think there should be a greater focus on creating more roles which the physically disabled could do without travelling such as working as a call centre operative or other telephone support capacity.
    1. Use a telephone headset (Tick)
    2. Use a computer (Tick)

    Its not what you cant do, its what you can that matters.




  • Comment number 23.

    15. At 12:43pm on 29 Nov 2010, parisboldaslove wrote:
    Whether meaning to or not I think that a large amount of the general public are blase about disabilities. Parking spaces seem to be a constant problem and many of the people who selfishly park in disabled bays when they are perfectly able bodied are rude and abusive when confronted about it. I have witnessed this myself many times as my mother has mobility problems and had a blue badge. Why? What is it to someone walking a slightly longer distance when they don't have to endure pain? To add to this, despite the DDA I still see many public places that are inaccessible for disabled people - shops with doorways, toilets up stairs, aisles too small to fit a wheelchair or scooter between them. It is no disadvantage to anyone to build ramps or widen shopping aisles, so why isn't it universally done?
    As for the comment about free or reduced cost cars, would you give your car away in lieu of getting a personal shopper? I thought not. Why deny people their independence and good quality of life just to save a few quid?

    --------------

    hmm you do realise were in a recession with a record deficit and outstanding debts? and everybody is feeling the cuts?
    thats why!

    any i also disagree that every building has brilliant disabled access most buildings will never see a wheelchair

  • Comment number 24.

    Apart from the few building modifications and kerb lowering for wheelchair access little is done against discrimination. The present government have instructed DWP to reassess the disabled's fitness for work levels, mainly so they can cut benefits.
    Employers, though covered under the discrimination act can find an excuse to not employ disabled people.
    My wife, a former civil servant, who would like to work and have her independence, but who needs crutches to walk attended an interview for a job for which she was qualified and said to me at the end of the interview, she had no chance, judging by how the interviewer looked at the crutches, she was right, she wasn't even shortlisted.
    Another occasion she got the job, a call centre, three months later she resigned as she couldn't return to her workstation after teabreaks in the allotted time and was constantly being reprimanded for being "late", her workstation was at the top of a flight of stairs even though the firm also had stations on ground level.
    So no, there's not enough being done along these lines and government should target the workshy, drug and alcohol addicted rather than those physically disabled who can manage a few feet on their own two legs who do look for work but find every obstacle put in their way by both employers and our caring coalition.

  • Comment number 25.

    Thank you BBC HYS team:

    It is so nice of you to allow this discussion, and for the great HYS commenter's to be allowed to blast the full force of there "Daily Mail" mind set at persons least able to defend themselves.

    Last Month it was Bash the Unemployed/Underclass/Benefit Scroungers, and this month you have sunk to lower depths, by abusing disabled persons.

    Congratulations BBC you have set back the welfare of Disabled Persons by 5 years!

  • Comment number 26.

    19. At 12:57pm on 29 Nov 2010, john wrote:
    look at the job market then were the disabled could be used but are not
    hospitals
    employment exchange
    airports
    railway stations
    doctors
    housing
    courts jury duty
    cleansing
    advice centers
    office worker
    sucurity
    employment fraud investigaters
    use the disabled in the police coms etc
    but no these jobs are taken by fit people young or immigrants

    ---------------

    perhaps a symptom of being overpopulated the weak suffer first and the most. its just the way it goes and unless we were a rich country there is not alot we can do about it. disabled people are going to be in for a hard few years as are the poor and unintellegent

  • Comment number 27.

    By and large I think that much has been done to help the disabled in our society. As it should have been.
    However..... I think things go too far when, for example, a small business is prevented from opening because they cannot afford to install disabled toilets... even though the business has no disabled customers!! (or very very few). I believe it is wrong that maybe hundreds or thousands of people could be prevented from using some business or facility because a very few disabled people cannot use it! common sense...

  • Comment number 28.

    "3. At 12:14pm on 29 Nov 2010, scotty1694 wrote:
    far to many people abuse the system with stress and depression and "made up handicaps"

    It is clear from your comments that you have never suffered with either of these complaints. I am sure that some people do abuse the system but the same can be said of some people with 'back pain' etc.

    Stress and depression are real and a nightmare for those that suffer from them.

  • Comment number 29.

    Quote / "16. At 12:56pm on 29 Nov 2010, callaspadeaspade wrote:
    .but also, once they have jumped through all the eligibility testing hoops, they get non means tested benefits for life." /End Quote

    Obviously you have no idea what the Benefits system is for Disabled Persons.

    DLA (Diability Living Allowance) is awarded on the basis of a Medical assessment carried out by a Doctor(s), and includes physical and mental tasks

    It can take up to 6 months to undergo the entire process, and even then more than 70% are refused, and lead to appeals.

    DLA is also awarded "indefinately" NOT for Life. Which means the Claimant can be recalled and reassesd at anytime that the DWP decide.

    Unemployed Disabled Persons have to meet the same criteria for benefits as anyone else and are penalised just the same, if the fail to stick to the rules.

  • Comment number 30.

    paying over £1.000 aweek for carers and giving them
    full DLA MOBILITY is wrong to many men want females to be
    there carers.if on full 24 hour carer requirement then they do not need so much money take away mobility and high rate dla just unenemployment
    as the care is doing all the work
    families get £53 pounds for caring 24 hours 7 days aweek.
    why so much for single yet so little for families?
    put this money into employment of people with health conditions
    able to work in the community

  • Comment number 31.

    I think part of the problem is that we have recognised far too many disabilities, both physical and mental.

    We now have a society where you can if you choose say that you are depressed and thats your disability, no one can challenge that.

    Knowing someone who chooses not to work because of their minor disability, I call it minor because I have exactly the same ailment, 9no to mention others)I have to admire those obviously disabled people who try their hardest not to let their disabilities stop them from working and getting on in life with little help from anyone else other than specialised equipment.

    Soft labour has allowed thousands to get on the disability gravy train... well usually a fully funded car.

    The numbers of "disabled" in the article is staggering!

  • Comment number 32.

    30. At 1:20pm on 29 Nov 2010, john wrote:

    paying over £1.000 aweek for carers and giving them
    full DLA MOBILITY is wrong to many men want females to be
    there carers.if on full 24 hour carer requirement then they do not need so much money take away mobility and high rate dla just unenemployment
    as the care is doing all the work
    families get £53 pounds for caring 24 hours 7 days aweek.
    why so much for single yet so little for families?
    put this money into employment of people with health conditions
    able to work in the community.

    =======================

    Therein lies the problem. A huge business in providing care, expensive job agencies and workers equals a lot of jobs.

  • Comment number 33.

    hahaha you're joking right?? Even the DWP are prejudiced against those with disabilities & trying to get out of paying them what they're entitled to. I have noticed that many disabled people (re)applying for DLA are getting turned down or receiving less than they are entitled, easy for those scamming the system to get around but causing more stress & upset for already frail people.

    My partner is disabled. He would love to work, but his conditions mean that he is in constant pain. His condition varies from day to day, some days he's able to function, but most days he's in awful pain & the only thing he can do is sleep. This is not conducive with maintaining regular employment. Before his hip & kidneys got really bad he was extremely active first serving in the RAMC then in a well paid civilian medical job. He is no longer able to do this which is making him depressed. He has volunteered some of his time to helping the Royal British Legion as & when he is able, but is frustrated that his condition prevents him from doing more. His meagre existence now is literally hand to mouth. DLA is NOT a living wage, it only just covers the cost of living a basic existence. He has had to accept a considerable drop in living standards. Those living the life of riley on benefits are not doing so on benefits alone, it's virtually impossible.

    Some of the views expressed earlier on this thread disgust me. The car provided through mobility has been a lifeline for my partner. If he didn't have the car he would be virtually housebound. He certainly wouldn't be able to afford to buy a care whilst in receipt of benefits. It appears that the critics of the mobility car REALLY do not understand how vital it is for those who are genuinely disabled & the media are not helping with their constant portrayal of all DLA claimants as scroungers who are playing the system. Just spare a little thought for those truly in need & those of us who give up our time to provide proper loving care to their relatives at great expense (emotionally & health-wise)to themselves.

  • Comment number 34.

    with attitudes lik ethis from our Prime Minister, what hope have we got?

    https://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/news/burnleypendlerossendale/8705958.Rawtenstall_woman_hits_out_at_Prime_Minister_s__dwarf__jibe/

    the online response to Gillian's comments were disgraceful,eventually most were removed but they were really offensive.
    The same happened when a local man recently won an employment tribunal after his supervisor at REMPLOY called him "Ironside" and bullied him until he had no choice but to go to tribunal.

    As a disabled person, who was told I could not use a lift in college in 1981 therefore making me leave my course, I have seen many changes but attitudes are still woeful in many places, work or socially

  • Comment number 35.

    . At 1:07pm on 29 Nov 2010, Spinonthis wrote:
    Thank you BBC HYS team:

    It is so nice of you to allow this discussion, and for the great HYS commenter's to be allowed to blast the full force of there "Daily Mail" mind set at persons least able to defend themselves.

    Last Month it was Bash the Unemployed/Underclass/Benefit Scroungers, and this month you have sunk to lower depths, by abusing disabled persons.

    Congratulations BBC you have set back the welfare of Disabled Persons by 5 years!

    Apologies to the BBC - I have not cleared my comments with "Spinonthis" yet. But if you, the BBC value the freedom of speech as I do, perhaps you would publish them anyway.

    It is regrettable that some of our fellow citizens are less physically and mentally capable than others through impairment arising from defects at birth or by accident. Whilst I support every effort to accomodate them in the full spectrum of opportunities available, it is not reasonable to legislate to provide unrealistic opportunities at work and leisure. We should do our utmost to help them but retain a sense of balance and context.

  • Comment number 36.

    I thought enough was in the Western world. In this part of the world the disabled ones are like jinxed! The vast majority of the populace don't want to associate with them, there are little or no job chances for them, most of them never think working is for them. All you hear about disability is a kind of negative cliche.

  • Comment number 37.

    I think the disabled have done well out of legislation so far. No need for any more concessions, for now, I think. In fact there has been too much legislation altogether over the past decade, dictating to this or that part of our lives.

  • Comment number 38.

    #21. At 1:02pm on 29 Nov 2010, scotty1694 wrote:
    12. At 12:38pm on 29 Nov 2010, Spinonthis wrote:
    Quote / "3. At 12:14pm on 29 Nov 2010, scotty1694 wrote:

    also fail to see why disabled people get free cars

    do they not realise all they do is just rent these cars out and put more money in there pockets?
    they could probably recall all these free cars or discounted cars and use the money to hire people
    to do the shopping for them?" /End Quote

    The Cars are NOT FREE Disabled Drivers pay for them with there own Disability Living Allowance.
    Or in the case of service personel they pay from there Disabled perons War Pension

    I have a Car funded from my own DLA, why?

    Because I am unable to walk more than 25mtrs, and that same criterea
    applies to all persons entitled to obtain a car under the scheme. In some cases it is not the Driver who is the
    Disabled person, it may be there spouse/partner or Brother/Sister etc.

    That car enables me to work, and get on with my life, without it, I would be housebound and a burden to society.

    Your comment is Crass in the extreme, perhaps someone should "Beam You UP Scotty" back to the Planet you come from!

    ------------


    stop talking out your backside


    pay for them out of there own DLA

    excuse me WHO pays? taxpayers thats who
    who pays for the car to be bought and then loaned?

    and even that point aside

    the may pay from there DLA
    but guess what
    you hire it out for MORE to a family member or a friend you get some extra money and a car when you need it
    the other person gets a brand new car on the cheap.

    at the end of the day if your on DLA
    you have no choice beggars cant be choosers


    and ill say it agaib i SAID 80% could probably work
    so will you all grow a brain and maybe just maybe understand that maybe some people on HYS are in the 20% i have no problem with?
    so stop rambling on as if i have made the statements as if they were said to you in person aimed at you.

    ----------------------

    You seem to be a rather rude and obnoxious person who obviously knows of a family that abuses the disabled car facility. If you are so upset about it why don't you just let the authorities know of your suspicions so that they can act accordingly, instead of taking it out on the 99% of claimants who use the facility properly. There will always be those who abuse the system, but they are, and have always been, in the minority. Don't tarr all disabled people with the same brush. You might like to bear in mind that should, god forbid, you have a bad accident, you might even end up disabled yourself.

  • Comment number 39.

    After my diagnosis of a progressive degenerative illness I became officially "Disabled"
    Nothing I or my health care professionals could say would convince my employer to allow me to continue working in my existing job as a technician for Brent education authority.

    I found the disability discrimination act was not "Accessible" to me so I was put on incapacity benefit by my employer.

    I had no voice or access to justice so here I am 6 years later with the government telling me in principal that disabled people should work to earn their benefit.

    My employers solicitors do not want to negotiate with me to find a solution to my employment situation so I have had to take them to an employment tribunal.
    What will the outcome be ? who knows.

    Disability and employment discrimination still exists and I don't think it will ever end.

    Anonymouse

  • Comment number 40.

    Quote/ "21. At 1:02pm on 29 Nov 2010, scotty1694 wrote:

    stop talking out your backside


    pay for them out of there own DLA

    excuse me WHO pays? taxpayers thats who
    who pays for the car to be bought and then loaned?

    and even that point aside

    the may pay from there DLA
    but guess what
    you hire it out for MORE to a family member or a friend you get some extra money and a car when you need it
    the other person gets a brand new car on the cheap.

    at the end of the day if your on DLA
    you have no choice beggars cant be choosers


    and ill say it agaib i SAID 80% could probably work
    so will you all grow a brain and maybe just maybe understand that maybe some people on HYS are in the 20% i have no problem with?
    so stop rambling on as if i have made the statements as if they were said to you in person aimed at you." / End Quote

    Disability Living Allowance is awarded as a Benefit on the basis of need and to allow a Disabled person to fulfill an active life.

    The DLA I receive is awarded because I have that need the same as everyone else's.

    You would therefore deny People injured at work or whilst serving this country and losing limbs the right to live a decent life.

    (I think that in itself says more about you than anything else)

    I Do NOT hire my Car out, nor does anyone else Drive it, I am the ONLY Driver on the insurance.
    Your statement that this is done and is the norm is suggesting that all Disabled persons are benfit fraudsters and cheats.

    If a DLA recipeint were to "Loan" out his/her car as you suggest and were found out, they would lose there entitlement to a Car, and the Motability Scheme would take there car off them.

    So not only will you deny them a lawful entitlement to Benefits you wish to accuse them of being Criminals on nothing more than your own ignorance and prejudices.

    As for Beggar cannot be chosers, that in itself is an Insult in the extreme. The days are long gone in this country
    where we see Criples and Sick people begging on the streets with a bowl or a tin cup!

    But perhaps that is what you hanker for? Your views are as insulting as they are antiquated.

  • Comment number 41.

    An awful lot of comments today that are very close to off topic or from people who obviously have no idea what they are talking about.

    To return to the topic, I dont see what more can be done to end discrimination against the disabled. Indeed in some respects legislation seems to have gone too far the other way, and as always there are lawyers just waiting to get a slice of the discrimination pie.

    The real problem seems to be the perception of the public that every disabled person is a sponger. Whilst I agree that those with nothing more wrong with them than an ingrown toe nail should be pilloried, not nearly enough is done to help the genuinely disabled.

    So surely common semse dictates that if we waste less money on the chancers, those who truly deserve our help and support should get more.

  • Comment number 42.

    a just lost mi right leg on the 27/10/2010 due to long term illness and I apply to disability living allowance and i was dined is that fair !!!??? I cant work only the wife as a full time job still have to wait 6months for my prosthetic leg....

  • Comment number 43.

    Disability discrimination.

    Disability is complex, wide-ranging and not always visible. Which is possibly why the blue badge symbol that includes the shape of a wheelchair is now very out-dated and very discriminating too? However, that's another debate on perceptions of disability.

    People can be born with, or develop, or have sudden disability forced upon them via a car accident; their occupation, genetic, cancer, heart problems etc., etc. The list is wide and variable.

    Many news reports over recent years have highlighted an increase in hate crime against those with disabilities.

    Laws against disability discrimation are one thing, and most employers do very well. However, protection of the disabled person against personal abuse, from certain nasty sections of the public, appears to be lacking, as with ageism - also on the increase.

    Yes, there are those reported cases of fake disabilities to defraud the benefit system and they should be exposed. However, for the majority of those with a disability they want to be involved in society and hate being isolated or bullied - just like anyone else.

  • Comment number 44.

    disability discrimation is worse than its ever been.

    my wife has a visable disability and is constantly been called names and laughed at in public the abuse is on a daily basis it is sole distroying for her.

    i blame the press and media who constanly call people scoungers and workshy, when are they going to realise this constant barage is leading to quenuenly sick and disabled people being the brunt of bullying of vicious mental abuse.


    in the survey done by the bbc it states 40% people surveyed think disabled turn down work, what utter nonsence, how could ordinary people possibly know this, once again it is a perscetion picked up from reading storys in the media, shame on the bbc for even asking a question of the general public which only disabled people and their familys could answer truthfully and with knowlege.

  • Comment number 45.

    I think what needs to be done is more support for the EMPLOYER.

    Disability discrimination legislation now is so draconian that an employer (especially a small employer) would rightly be scared before taking on someone who is disabled, in case it's hard to fire them if they can't do the job, or in case providing the support for them in their disability costs too much. So, they'll find excuses (not related to the disability) not to employ them.

    If an employer knows they'll get help & advice (maybe financial help if they have to incur costs installing ramps, widening doors etc), and will be able to say 'well, we gave it good go, but it didn't work out' without the risk of a costly tribunal if there are too many problems, then they may be more willing to risk it.

    I know someone who has psychotic episodes. He had a job which he was good at, and enjoyed, but the employer wouldn't keep anyone on for more than a year because then it got too hard to fire them if their disability caused problems. (Reducing this time would just mean people would have jobs for even less time).

    So, disability discrimation law can actually make things worse rather than better. It certainly stops openness and free conversation. For instance, if a disabled person applies for a job, the conversation could not possibly go 'what would we need to do to accommodate you in our offices? how much would it cost? hmm, I don't think we can afford that, is there any financial help we can get?'. The employer has to pretend that these issues are not even considered, and then just err on the side of caution and find a reason not to offer them the job.

  • Comment number 46.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 47.

    Do disability services need to be improved? Is disability discrimination still a problem? Do you have a personal experience to share?

    Yes the services need to be improved, and not necessarily with more rules/regulations/laws. If the existing laws were actually enforced the issues would improve 10 fold.

    The big problem (speaking as a Disabled person) is often you are spoken about as if your not in the room. Typically someone will ask of my Wife "And how is he today?" as if I am deaf dumb and blind.

    I AM SAT HERE IN THE SAME ROOM, I AM NOT STUPID, I AM NOT INCAPABLE OF ANSWERING, SPEAK TO ME!

  • Comment number 48.

    What about people with hidden disabilities such as high functioning autism, asperger syndrome and dyspraxia. It is hard to get a diagnosis as an adult using the N.H.S.

    Knowledge of the condsitions, even highly educated people with those conditions cannot work !!!

  • Comment number 49.

    Tomorrow I have a Job interview, I will come back an let you know how it goes, and if the prospective employer takes his obligations seriously in regard to employment of Disabled Persons.

  • Comment number 50.

    I think the clue is in the title of the question:

    "Is enough being done to end disability discrimination?"

    The implication is that such discrimination is still with us, so this whole question is based on predicated perception.

    I might have the perception that all new houses and businesses should ensure they have reasonable access for those who are differently abled. I might also think, of course, that all new houses and businesses should embrace renewable energies such as geothermal and solar. I might think instead that discrimination runs both ways and many disabled people are positively discriminated, getting extra help with work, such as guaranteed interviews. but all this is perception depending on which side of the bed I got out of today.

    In truth I was born around the time of the first legislation so have grown up with a view of my friends as being friends and of rude people being rude people, and neither able-bodied nor disabled people have cornered either market. Don't look at me and see a middle-aged able-bodied caucasian married family man, see me.

  • Comment number 51.

    "44. At 2:05pm on 29 Nov 2010, budugs wrote:
    disability discrimation is worse than its ever been.
    ....shame on the bbc for even asking a question of the general public which only disabled people and their familys could answer truthfully and with knowlege."
    ___________________________________________

    How ironic, budugs, that you say disability discrimination is worse than it has ever been, then immediately discriminate against non-disabled people. How, indeed, could we know how you feel? Perhaps by asking and listening, and by keeping an open mind and not being blinkered and narrow-minded about how others perceive us. Shame, indeed.

  • Comment number 52.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 53.

    To the lam-basters like "scotty1694"

    Perhaps you should read this before you sit there on your smug backside disparaging every disabled person in the country.

    And I Quote "

    The Department of Work and Pensions itself has always said that the level of cheating amongst genuinely disabled people has always been very small; and let us be clear, all those claiming disability work-related benefit have been deemed by a doctor to need it. "

  • Comment number 54.

    The disabled who screamed for handicapped access to public transport, demanded equality, insisted every business in the land installed ramps, huge bogs, lifts, access, workplaces all at no cost to themselves now moan because a politician has dared to suggest they actually make use of the billions forcibly spent on them by actually getting a job, you know the jobs they DEMANDED under equality legislation.

    The media is full of the vested interests of those who blatently admit the only reason they are employed by the State was to hit Fabian quotas for blacks, ethnics, LGBT or handicapped people in the workplace, regardless that a poor shelf stacker on £12K a year was forced to finance their position of diversity outreach officer to satisfy the Utopian dreams of Labours one party state.

  • Comment number 55.

    "44. At 2:05pm on 29 Nov 2010, budugs wrote:
    disability discrimation is worse than its ever been.
    ...shame on the bbc for even asking a question of the general public which only disabled people and their familys could answer truthfully and with knowlege."
    ________________________________________

    How ironic.

    You say only disabled could know the answer, implying I am not as knowledgeable as you. That, my friend, is discrimination, and I'd have thought you would know all about that. Shame, indeed!

  • Comment number 56.

    Newsflash.

    Large portions of the population have trouble sympathising with people that are different, therefore making stupid & ignorant comments based off antidotal evidence .

    More news at 11.

  • Comment number 57.

    25. At 1:07pm on 29 Nov 2010, Spinonthis wrote:
    Thank you BBC HYS team:

    It is so nice of you to allow this discussion, and for the great HYS commenter's to be allowed to blast the full force of there "Daily Mail" mind set at persons least able to defend themselves.

    Last Month it was Bash the Unemployed/Underclass/Benefit Scroungers, and this month you have sunk to lower depths, by abusing disabled persons.

    Congratulations BBC you have set back the welfare of Disabled Persons by 5 years!



    This post is hugely insulting.
    Why do you think that disabled people are unable to verbally defend themselves? Most disabilities are physical not mental; and this sort of comment just reinforces the flawed stereotype that disabled = feeble minded.

    The deal is this: We have laws and support in place to make things easier for disabled people. These laws and benefits narrow the gap between the able bodied and the disabled, making it possible for those that are impaired to live their lives on a (roughly) equal footing to those that are not and with a bit of dignity.

    Comments like yours erode that dignity.

  • Comment number 58.

    There are plenty of facilities and allowances made for the genuinely disabled, though there is always room for improvement. Most of the genuinely disabled are keen to work if they can find something they can do. However there are a lot of people who masquerade as disabled who have no intention of ever working." Sore backs " and " depression " cover a lot of territory when the real problem is laziness. Drug and alcohol dependents should not be classed as disabled or ill, they are just self indulgent and should not be paid for by the taxpayer.

  • Comment number 59.

    "47. At 2:14pm on 29 Nov 2010, Spinonthis wrote:
    Do disability services need to be improved? Is disability discrimination still a problem? Do you have a personal experience to share?

    Yes the services need to be improved, and not necessarily with more rules/regulations/laws. If the existing laws were actually enforced the issues would improve 10 fold.

    The big problem (speaking as a Disabled person) is often you are spoken about as if your not in the room. Typically someone will ask of my Wife "And how is he today?" as if I am deaf dumb and blind.

    I AM SAT HERE IN THE SAME ROOM, I AM NOT STUPID, I AM NOT INCAPABLE OF ANSWERING, SPEAK TO ME!"

    This I can vouch for,

    Having grown up with a family member with a disability, it sickens me when I see how people speak to those with disabilities.

    I mean, especially when they have crutches or a wheelchair - all this indicates is that there legs are not working correctly, nothing to do with there brain.

    It's worth pointing out that this does not just relate to disabled people, I hear the same tone when people speak to the elderly, or when sexist people speak to couples (anything that is stereotypically female they speak to the women, male to the men).

    Another particular annoying habit is when people act overly nice, what part of equality do they not understand.

    Treat them like you would anybody else, there is no other way of ending discrimination.

  • Comment number 60.


    29. At 1:19pm on 29 Nov 2010, Spinonthis

    "DLA is also awarded "indefinately" NOT for Life. Which means the Claimant can be recalled and reassesd at anytime that the DWP decide.

    Unemployed Disabled Persons have to meet the same criteria for benefits as anyone else and are penalised just the same, if the fail to stick to the rules."

    That's precisely what I referred to as the "eligibility hoops". A genuinely disabled person whose condition is unlikely to change will of course be subject to reasessment, but unless their eligibility is questionable to start with indefibately is effectively for life.

    I'm not being controversial- merely pointing out that we have a system that is supposed to prohibit discrimination and ensure equal access at the same time as funding people to stay at home because they can't work!

  • Comment number 61.

    4. At 12:16pm on 29 Nov 2010, ace riley wrote:
    As a disabled person i find that most laws are there for the sake of keeping people like myself quiet?When i go shopping most stores dont enforce their disabled parking spaces which leave people like myself open to abuse from these inconsiderate drivers who think disabled people should not have parking spaces.And the stores and shops dont give a dam .The public in general dont respect disabled people because laws are not enforced to protect us.
    ===========================
    Perhaps you're not respected because you are the sort who thinks that "respect" is due to you just because of a disability and that respect should be legally enforced.

    Disabled people must earn respect as much as the able should.

  • Comment number 62.

    56. At 2:29pm on 29 Nov 2010, Mark wrote:

    Newsflash.

    Large portions of the population have trouble sympathising with people that are different, therefore making stupid & ignorant comments based off antidotal evidence .

    More news at 11.

    ______________________________

    Your comments aren't "stupid & ignorant" because?

    Your evidence isn't "antidotal" :), how?

  • Comment number 63.

    From where are our rights derived?

  • Comment number 64.

    The symbol for disability is a drawing of a person in a wheelchair. I think that reflects society's thinking. Not much is done for those with a mental disability. My son has very severe autism and has never had any extra help in the outside world. It has always been up to me to get him through. To make matters worse, twice at airports staff have blocked his way in order to allow a person in a wheel chair to go ahead of him. They became quite rude when I explained that he was far more disabled.

    There needs to be much more focus on helping the mentally disabled go out and about. I don't want my son to spend his life sedated in front of the TV.

  • Comment number 65.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 66.

    As a "disabled" person..then again I thought I was a person!!...I can honestly say that I would love to go back to work. To those who say "well go on"..
    1. will you wipe my backside/more to the point WILL I LET YOU?
    2. will you turn off all the fluorescent lights in the building and what would you replace them with?
    3. will you please ask the Highways Department to repair the roads so that I will no longer have a journey from hell too and from work due to the vibration that sends painful shocks to my head/eyes/neck?
    4. will you cover for me and do my workload when it is impossible for me to get out off bed some mornings?
    5. will you mind if I fall asleep at my desk/work place after taking the pain medication which assists with my daily life and/or after only 2 hours sleep at night - if lucky?
    6. will you mind if I attend work late and then leave early?
    I would love to go back to my previous employment...please note that I worked for 35 years with very little time off being ill (ironic)!!!
    Get OFF your high horses..I for one am NOT a scrounger and I resent being referred to as one.
    I am absolutely LIVID. Oh by the way this has taken me one hour to type..disgraceful in my eyes as I was a typist with an excellent speed!!

    7.

  • Comment number 67.

    teedoff: i do not say discrimination is worse, i know it is through personell experience.

    teedoff: i have never discriminated against anyone in my life, if you think what i said was discrimination then you should try living with true disibiliy discrimination day in day out, month in month out never ending and constant.

    teedoff; i am not sure i understood what you were trying to say in your comment but i stick to my comment that the bbc should have asked disabled people about their experinces of the work and finding a job.

    were they given the opputunity to answer don,t know which would have made the survey more valid.



  • Comment number 68.

    For those who are genuinely disabled a lot more needs to be done by local authorities, central government and big business. The exception to this, for example, is a disabled person who has been awarded megabucks thru a compensation claim. They, via a fat cat lawyer, accepted an award and if they want extra then they should query their no win no fee lawyer why they did not receive those extras thru their compensation. They should not expect the public purse to stump up because of a lawyer's incompetence.

  • Comment number 69.

    Whenever the subject of discrimination against the disabled is thrust under my nose, I am mindful of that wonderful sketch in "Beyond the Fringe", in which the irrepressibly optimistic left-legless Mr. Spiggot, played by Dudley Moore, auditions for the role of Tarzan.
    Peter Cook: "Your right leg I like. I like your right leg. That's what I said when I saw it come in Mr. Spiggot. 'Lovely leg. Lovely, lovely leg'. I've got nothing against your right leg, Mr. Spiggot. The trouble is, neither have you."
    I hate discrimination against any minority, but dislike positive preferment just as much.

  • Comment number 70.

    Ok,yes things are moving forward if your only marginally disabled and have your marbles but what about the rest?If you can work,your a hero if you cant your forgotten and left to rot on low benefits,stigmatised as worthless.Many disabled people cannot hope to achieve the heights of those who claim to be disabled but are "able" enough to be tv presenters or actors etc;but those who rely heavily on "carers"are sidelined just as they have always been.And guess what under the Con/Dem-merchants those who have the least are going to get even less,so are the disabled discriminated against?Of course they are-why even ask?

  • Comment number 71.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 72.

    //61. At 2:44pm on 29 Nov 2010, Steve Edwards wrote:
    4. At 12:16pm on 29 Nov 2010, ace riley wrote:
    As a disabled person i find that most laws are there for the sake of keeping people like myself quiet?When i go shopping most stores dont enforce their disabled parking spaces which leave people like myself open to abuse from these inconsiderate drivers who think disabled people should not have parking spaces.And the stores and shops dont give a dam .The public in general dont respect disabled people because laws are not enforced to protect us.
    ===========================
    Perhaps you're not respected because you are the sort who thinks that "respect" is due to you just because of a disability and that respect should be legally enforced.

    Disabled people must earn respect as much as the able should.//

    Steve - I seriously don't do pc. If what you said applied to ethnic or religious minorities claiming to be victims, I'd be with you.

    But here, the person you are replying to is making a valid point. There should be disabled parking spaces, and these should be used only by the genuinely disabled.




  • Comment number 73.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 74.

    yes yes its totally unfair to take away dosabled peoples FREE cars dla or not the dla money is free too

    while its perfectly fair millions atm can barely afford to run one or simply cant yes im a total monster how dare i say people on benefits disabled or jsa etc only get the same as most people!

    total bigot that i am!!


    i suppose you could say all of the royal family are disabled too! just born and given money etc!

    i however like the royal family so that is a joke.

  • Comment number 75.

    //42. At 1:47pm on 29 Nov 2010, Joao Silva wrote:
    a just lost mi right leg on the 27/10/2010 due to long term illness and I apply to disability living allowance and i was dined is that fair !!!??? I cant work only the wife as a full time job still have to wait 6months for my prosthetic leg....//

    If true, that's terrible. A very close relative of mine claims DLA, perfectly legitimately, and your experience sounds very different from theirs.

    Their condition is entirely real, verifiable and serious, though not worse than the one you claim to have. It seems odd and out of character for the organisation to be giving you a hard time on what seems such an obvious claim.

    Maybe things have changed with the new government?

    That being said, from your name and your English, no offence, but are you actually from the UK? Maybe there are issues around entitlement based on your nationality. Again, I might be making massive assumptions, but I can imagine that a Brit working in, say, Portugal or certainly Brazil, would get very little assistance in your situation.

  • Comment number 76.

    Yes and no :)

    In a tough job market it is simple to select someone for whom you won't need to make expensive alterations to accommodate: you've satisfied the requirements of employment law by giving any disabled applicants an interview.

    Oh, and did you know that if your disability means that you cannot hand-complete a form... the one bunch who don't make any effort to supply an electronic version of their form are... DWP!!!!

  • Comment number 77.

    Quote / " 31. At 1:27pm on 29 Nov 2010, lolages wrote:

    I think part of the problem is that we have recognised far too many disabilities, both physical and mental.

    We now have a society where you can if you choose say that you are depressed and thats your disability, no one can challenge that.

    Knowing someone who chooses not to work because of their minor disability, I call it minor because I have exactly the same ailment, 9no to mention others)I have to admire those obviously disabled people who try their hardest not to let their disabilities stop them from working and getting on in life with little help from anyone else other than specialised equipment.

    Soft labour has allowed thousands to get on the disability gravy train... well usually a fully funded car.

    The numbers of "disabled" in the article is staggering! " /end Quote


    Only to be outdone by the number of bigots.

    People keep banging on about a Fully Funded Car.

    It is NOT fully funded it is provide to recipients of Disability Living Allowance who receive the Higher Rate Mobility award.

    More often than not the person who obtains a car has to pay a deposit of anything from £500 to £5000 which is non refundable, they may also have to pay out for adaptations to the vehicle. Hand Controls, Chair Lifts, Ramps etc... at a cost of £thousands which they never get back, and have to pay out again and again every time the lease expires.

    The Motability Scheme is a Charity. it is one of the largest purchasers of Fleet Vehicles in the UK. If it were to be "removed" or discontinued, a whole industry would collapse, not least of which the Car Industry which was baled out with low interest loans not so long back.

    That Benefit is to enable the person to take part in everyday life, it allows them the freedom to work, shop, take part in social and leisure activities, contribute to there own and there families well being.

    It is clear that people who are not in receipt of this Benefit think it it is some sort of free hand out, it is not, the level of incapacity of a claimant is such that they would be unable to function without it.

    My Car (yes provided under the Motability Scheme) is leased, I do not own it. It is paid for using my Mobility benefit.

    This allows me to work, and pay taxes.

    I actually pay more tax in a week than the benefits I get for a month.
    (When I am working) at present I am between jobs, but that may change tomorrow. So wish me luck, then I can pay more Tax to help out the country. AND THE DISABLED less fortunate than I am.

  • Comment number 78.

    "67. At 3:00pm on 29 Nov 2010, budugs wrote:
    teedoff: i do not say discrimination is worse, i know it is through personell experience.

    teedoff: i have never discriminated against anyone in my life, if you think what i said was discrimination then you should try living with true disibiliy discrimination day in day out, month in month out never ending and constant.

    teedoff; i am not sure i understood what you were trying to say in your comment but i stick to my comment that the bbc should have asked disabled people about their experinces of the work and finding a job.

    were they given the opputunity to answer don,t know which would have made the survey more valid."

    Budugs, I am not having a go at you, per se, but you implied that only those who live in the immediate environs of disability understand the discrimination that occurs. I disagree with that, as I feel it is discriminatory against others who suffer discrimination for other reasons. My wife was a head-teacher in her native Ukraine, but couldn't get full accreditation as a teacher in this country - because the new head-teacher could not vouch for her work from personal experience! She is now retraining as a nurse, using this country's university system. But she still undergoes discrimination because of her accent - on a daily basis. This will be a second degree for her, so when people talk to me instead of her, as if she were idiotic, she has the same feelings as you engender. She is often viewed as less than she really is. So I feel I talk from a position of knowledge when I suggest that your comment held some irony, as it talked about discrimination against you while unwittingly discriminating against others. I hope I've cleared this up for you now.

  • Comment number 79.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 80.

    People with real disables must be sickened when they hear about people like this

    https://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/214395/How-many-more-children-for-the-most-feckless-father-in-Britain-

  • Comment number 81.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 82.

    //70. At 3:15pm on 29 Nov 2010, stevegrant wrote:
    Ok,yes things are moving forward if your only marginally disabled and have your marbles but what about the rest?If you can work,your a hero if you cant your forgotten and left to rot on low benefits,stigmatised as worthless.Many disabled people cannot hope to achieve the heights of those who claim to be disabled but are "able" enough to be tv presenters or actors etc;but those who rely heavily on "carers"are sidelined just as they have always been.And guess what under the Con/Dem-merchants those who have the least are going to get even less,so are the disabled discriminated against?Of course they are-why even ask? //

    Few people seem to have any real problem with assisting the genuinely disabled, and of allowing those who can work to work.

    But you seem to question the right of the government and wider society to question those who might be milking the system.

    The biggest threat to our entire welfare state has come from the way it has been abused, by groups as diverse as teenage single mums, pretend handicapped, asylum seekers and the legal profession supporting them.



  • Comment number 83.

    I am just returned to the workplace/university after a year out in a wheelchair. I am on a stick and was assured at interview (I applied for teacher training), that my need of two things would be no barrier. I asked that my placements be in the city that I work in, as travel is a problem, and that I could have a chair or stool in classes so that I could sit down occasionally if needed. Both of these requests have been backed up with doctors notes and discussions they requested to 'best meet my needs'.

    When I requested a chair in my placement school I was told to 're-consider whether I am physically capable of the profession', and I have had to fight with the faculty to get a reasonable placement; the first one they assigned me was 57 miles away! The lack of response to my needs has in fact reduced my mobility and ability, giving me considerable pain and stress.

    I have fought and fought to return to work and 'normal' life, as a lot of people with disabilities I have met are doing, but attitudes are such that it is extremely difficult to work! I want to work and I intend to, but I can see why other disabled people shy from constantly having to fight and be generally obnoxious to get the simplest of needs met!

  • Comment number 84.

    "
    79. At 3:42pm on 29 Nov 2010, Free from the BBC wrote:

    · 8. At 12:29pm on 29 Nov 2010, Kuradi Vitukari wrote:
    Is enough being done to end disability discrimination? In some ways it's gone over the top. For example, when I drive into my local City on a Saturday, it's hard to find a parking space, yet there literally hundreds and hundreds of empty disabled and mother + baby bays in the city's car parks.


    ############################

    So?
    "

    The bays are empty, which means there are too many of them. In one car park there is a whole floor with 100+ disabled spaces, almost all are alwasy empty. Where's the logic in that?

  • Comment number 85.

    As a disabled gentleman and confined to a wheelchair myself, I have to agree; like it or not, the blue badge scheme is being abused by people who claim to be disabled and who are clearly, not. I myself when parking my car, purposely look for a space at the end with enough access on the offside so I can get out with my wheelchair then wheel myself into the shops.

    I am grateful to those businesses and local authorities that take into consideration wheelchair users but my concern is, some employers still look down their noses on employing a disabled workforce, and are more concerned with their appearance.

  • Comment number 86.

    "19. At 12:57pm on 29 Nov 2010, john wrote:
    look at the job market then were the disabled could be used but are not
    hospitals
    employment exchange
    airports
    railway stations
    doctors
    housing
    courts jury duty
    cleansing
    advice centers
    office worker
    sucurity
    employment fraud investigaters
    use the disabled in the police coms etc
    but no these jobs are taken by fit people young or immigrants"


    Certainly some of this jobs could be taken by someone with a disability, but they may have to arrive first. Many railway and undeground stations still only have flights of stairs, many buses still cannot cope well with wheelchairs.

    However, I do not agree with positive discrimination. Jobs should go on merit. And there are plenty of people with disabilities who would fulfil their roles excellently - if only they could get there.

  • Comment number 87.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 88.

    Yes the 1995 Act in Quite potent ...You will always find people who will abuse the disable .. By the same token you will find disable people who will "use " their disability to their own advantage .. Both are human nature ... And before you start on me I speak as one who is protected by the 1995 act

  • Comment number 89.

    The disability employment advisor knows nothing about the condition.Will they understand high functioning autism, asperger syndrome and dyspraxia, other hidden disabilities ? They are rude and friendly.

    They generally will not help disabled graduates.

  • Comment number 90.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 91.

    To all those lambasting the disabled, I would dearly love to change places with you to be once again able bodied, if I was given the chance. Then perhaps you'll realise just what it's like to be disabled or a paraplegic or quadriplegic. Some of us were born that way, we didn't have any say in it. Perhaps you believe we shouldn't have been born?

  • Comment number 92.

    25. At 1:07pm on 29 Nov 2010, Spinonthis wrote:

    Thank you BBC HYS team:

    It is so nice of you to allow this discussion, and for the great HYS commenter's to be allowed to blast the full force of there "Daily Mail" mind set at persons least able to defend themselves.

    Last Month it was Bash the Unemployed/Underclass/Benefit Scroungers, and this month you have sunk to lower depths, by abusing disabled persons.

    Congratulations BBC you have set back the welfare of Disabled Persons by 5 years!


    There's no better way of deflecting attention from anything than to blame the BBC.

  • Comment number 93.

    I SUFFERED FROM 4 YEARS OF BULLYING DISCRIMINATION HARASSMENT
    CALLED A SURKUR AFTER COMING OUT OF HOSPITAL,
    TOLD TO GO 4th & X C L,
    LOCKED OUT OF MY WORK PLACE.
    CALLED A GUT LESS T T.
    TOLD I WOULD BE DONE OUT SIDE OF WORK BY BULLY.

    ACCUSED OF PICKING MY JOBS.
    THERE WAS NO MONEY IN BUDGET FOR
    A MAN LIKE ME.
    CONSTANTLY REFUSED TO RETURN TO WORK AFTER OPERATION.
    UNLAWFULLY CUT WAGES.
    TOLD A MANAGER WOULD COME DOWN TO MY WORK PLACE TO SORT ME OUT.

    SUFFER A SECOND POST TRAUMATIC MENTAL HEALTH BREAKDOWN.
    TAKE MONTHS TO GET BACK TO WORK THEN I AM SACKED FOR A DISORDER / DISABILITY OF MY SPINE.

    LOST OUR HOME WE WORKED 30 YEARS FOR.
    AS WELL AS BEING FULL TIME CARERS OF HANDICAPPED SON.

    DISABILITY/DISCRIMINATION/EQUALITY/LEGISLATION GO4th.
    YES WHO DO CARE FOR CARERS ?????

  • Comment number 94.

    There seems to be a lot of confusion in regard to the Regulations on Disability and Disabled persons.

    So let me clarify:

    The Law
    There are three laws that apply to employers and their disabled workers.

    Under the Health and Safety at Work Etc. Act 1974, employers must protect the health, safety and welfare of disabled workers. (as they must also protect all workers)

    Under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 1995, employers must help disabled workers by making reasonable adjustments to a workplace and to working conditions. These adjustments must ensure that disabled workers have the same treatment as able-bodied employees.

    The final law is the Health and Safety (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2002. Employers must make sure that workstations, rest areas, lavatories, stairs, passageways and doors allow for the needs of disabled workers.

    Further Regulations apply to new build Property:

    The Building Regulations have a whole entire section that covers the criteria for new buildings to meet the requirements of the above act(s).

    These same regulations are also used by Businesses and Service providers to ensure that any adaptations made meet the requirements of the Disabled and are fit for purpose.

    It is hardly any use to build a Ramp for wheel chair access that is too steep, or too narrow to allow for its safe use.

    There are also further regulations within the DDA that pertain to the rights of Disabled members of the public for access to services and shops, etc.


    This does not mean they have a right to access every building it may mean for example that in the case where a building is not accessible and it is not practical to provide access to the building to obtain services, that the Service Provider visits the Disabled Person at home, or at an adjacent property that is suitable.

  • Comment number 95.

    Disability discrimination is still at an alarming level and is considered as a non crime by most authorities unless there is a physical injury. The situation within social housing is at a dangerous high with many forced evictions every year and so many suicides linked to housing issues for the disabled and the media always report on individual cases no one ever adds them up to see the true picture. A simple search on google for some social housing landlords reveals a history of abuse and discrimination that would result in criminal charges anywhere else in europe. Disability discrimination? we have taken onlythe first step in stamping it out but then we are disabled our steps are slow and faltering and hero`s in authority ready to take up our cause are very rare indeed

  • Comment number 96.

    Regrettably the DDA, its amendments and the advice given to employers does not go far enough. It never did and perhaps there was never an intention it would really deal with anthing other than the most serious cases of discrimination.

    It is still a requirement for a wronged employee to prove the employer discriminated solely on grounds of disability and it can be very difficult to do even when it is very obvious to the recipient just how they are being or have been treated. A chunk of the problem appears to be the classic problem of "big settlements" attracting media attention when it is the "small defeats" that should be noted. These include some of the most awful cases of employer neglect, and yet employers escape punishment.

    I would like the law to be changed to make it a requirement for the employer to prove they have not discriminated against the disabled employee. Such a change would make it essential for employers to at least try to accommodate a disabled employee rather than go through the motions of satisfying what an employment tribunal will require. Surely it was not the intention of the law to simply introduce tick boxes to satisfy the requirement to do the best to accommodate a disabled employee, for that is where we have ended.

  • Comment number 97.

    I noticed your invitation to share personal experiences of disability discrimination I and others would welcome the opportunity to share you can find us at [Unsuitable/Broken URL removed by Moderator]

  • Comment number 98.

    Some of the comments on this thread are at best offensive at worst "rabid" but this is the way we are moving as a society. There is no doubt that public opinion seems to be drifting to the right at some speed.
    History suggests that when this happens it is usually a good idea to "keep your head down" and try not to feature prominently amongst an easily identifiable section of society.
    Current sitting ducks include: The Unemployed, The Disabled, Some Ethnic Groups, Travellers, The Unions, Huntsmen, Drug Users, et al
    I am not seeking to legitamise this state of affairs as I think it to be appalling, I am just making the observation.

  • Comment number 99.

    "
    90. At 4:21pm on 29 Nov 2010, Free from the BBC wrote:

    · 84. At 4:00pm on 29 Nov 2010, Kuradi Vitukari wrote:
    "
    79. At 3:42pm on 29 Nov 2010, Free from the BBC wrote:

    · 8. At 12:29pm on 29 Nov 2010, Kuradi Vitukari wrote:
    Is enough being done to end disability discrimination? In some ways it's gone over the top. For example, when I drive into my local City on a Saturday, it's hard to find a parking space, yet there literally hundreds and hundreds of empty disabled and mother + baby bays in the city's car parks.


    ############################

    So?
    "

    The bays are empty, which means there are too many of them. In one car park there is a whole floor with 100+ disabled spaces, almost all are alwasy empty. Where's the logic in that?


    ######################################

    The logic is that they are reserved for disabled drivers when and if they need them.

    We the fit drivers are asked to walk 20 yards, I don’t find that a problem, why do you?

    "

    Because the car parks are full. There are no spaces left for able bodied drivers, yet no more than 10% of the spaces provided for disabled people are occupied, and I expect some of those are taken by able bodied and can't find a space. It's a waste, that's my point, nothing to do with walking further to the shops.

  • Comment number 100.



    Discounting the voice of the vulnerable disadvantaged

    Disabled people in continuing care are facing a new and worrying situation. It has long been the situation that disadvantage has been recognized and remediated by providing community care, which safeguards against relapse and a worsening situation for which statutory bodies like social services and Healthcare incur a multiplication of costs if they do not implement preventive intervention and provide a social base for vulnerable people to focus and rebuild their lives.

    For mental health, the last few years have seen these bases for social and specialist support falling like a house of cards. In our area, first the Resource at Duncan Macmillan House changed its independent basis for clients and carers to being reclaimed by the Healthcare Trust to serve the trust¿s interests as an Involvement centre. Next went Manor Road Day Centre for older people, not replace, and its clients shunted in the direction of the Broad Street Centre, which in turn closed a year ago last March, with no efforts being made to relocate a vulnerable clientele and all the specialist infrastructure that SPAN had built up with many years¿ experience of working with our needs. The Healthcare Trust needs to Protect its Investment, instead of sweeping it all away, which sets in motion a slide in care standards and a proliferation of costs which have to be met later. These personal and social costs show in rates of relapse - the old ¿revolving door¿ - and social problems which are left unmet and unmeasured except in high profile catastrophies like suicides and violations of the Law.

    The creation of an underclass of ignored people is very damaging to social cohesion and devastating for the people so ignored. Where the situation is changing it is in being not simply ignored but in being actively targeted with inappropriate expectations that the disabled ¿must work¿, that Day Care should produce outcomes that move people on - when these people are there with incurable illnesses and recognized vulnerabilities when working functionality is an unrealistic expectation. The protection of these people is safeguarded by Statute. The extent to which the catalogue of pre-meditated closures described here is in violation of statute is contended here to highlight what some people are hoping will not come to light, but this is something which is reaching scandalous proportions.

    As the futures of Beeston Day Centre and the Jewel in the crown of community provision - SPAN Foster Drive currently lie in the balance, the conclusion here is that statutory commitments to continuing care in the community are jettisoned each time a day care facility is swept away. These outcomes serve to hit the most vulnerable people the Hardest! Withdrawal of the investment in specialist provision that these have afforded recklessly throws a proliferating social and financial cost into an indeterminate future, with maximum distress and hardship for the blameless targeted people who deserve better than to be mal-treated in this way.

    Rodney Yates
    November 2010

 

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