Archives for November 2010

Should African women 'obey' their men?

AfricaHYS Team | 17:40 UK time, Tuesday, 30 November 2010

A study by the South African Medical Research Council has revealed that nine out of ten men believe that a woman should obey her husband. 

The research also shows that six out of ten women agree with that statement. Do you?

In Mali a proposal to change the law, so that women need no longer obey their husbands, is still causing controversy and is awaiting  parliamentary review. 

The Oxford English dictionary definition of the word "obey" is "to submit to the authority of, to carry out a command or instruction".  But does this word cause more problems than it solves? 

Aren't modern relationships more about listening, respecting and negotiating?

Is the continent still struggling with the changing role of women?   

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on  Wednesday December 01 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published

Is secrecy ever justified?

Africa HYS team | 12:06 UK time, Tuesday, 30 November 2010

The international diplomatic world is still furious with the Wikileaks website for releasing thousands of US diplomatic messages.

African newspapers

Apart from revelations like that of Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah urging the US to destroy Iran's nuclear facilities, the documents also show the unflattering views diplomats have expressed about various world leaders - many of them African.

The American government has called the release "reckless" and claims it puts the lives of diplomats at risk.

Diplomats and governments will always want as much secrecy as they can get, but is secrecy ever justified?

How do we balance the right to know the truth against the damage that might be caused by publishing it?

How much would you like to know about how your government operates behind closed doors?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Tuesday 30 November 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

Could it be boom time for African universities?

AfricaHYS Team | 17:07 UK time, Tuesday, 23 November 2010

As Britain prepares for the impact of sweeping government spending cuts, details are emerging of proposals to further reduce the number of visas issued  to non-EU students and workers.

The UK Migration Advisory Committee says the number of overseas students will need to be more than halved if the government is to meet its immigration target - a move that  will affect thousands of students from Africa with dreams of getting a British  university degree.

But is this an opportunity for universities in Africa? If studying abroad is out of reach for many, will students now decided to take degrees in their home countries. Indeed, should African universities now be trying to attract students from elsewhere in the world?

How  would you rate universities where you live? Could they attract more EU or American students?  Do you think a foreign acquired degree better than one from Africa?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Wednesday  24 November at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

 

 

Is Africa beating HIV/Aids?

Africa HYS team | 12:39 UK time, Tuesday, 23 November 2010

UNAids says the world is beginning to reverse the spread of HIV, but will the Pope's comments on condom use help or hinder progress in Africa?

The 2010 UNAids report says that in sub-Saharan Africa the rate of new infections is decreasing in 22 countries, and has stabilised in 12 others.

Meanwhile, aids campaigners have welcomed Pope Benedict's recent statement which seems to suggest a relaxation on the use of condoms in certain circumstances. 

But do you think the Pope's remarks will help in the fight against HIV?

Is Africa finally beating HIV/Aids? Do you see any evidence of that around you?  Can the progress be sustained?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Tuesday 23 November at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number.  It will not be published.

 

 

 

 

 

Do wills fuel family feuds in Africa?

AfricaHYS Team | 15:13 UK time, Wednesday, 17 November 2010

As the family of  Zambia's former President Levy Mwanawasa head for court in a row over his will, Africa Have Your Say asks whether wills can cause more problems than they solve?

A will is supposed to represent the final wishes of a deceased person, and yet the process can often lead to tensions over land, property and other possessions left behind.

So how effective are wills? How do you ensure your wishes are respected? Why are so many wills contested in court? How can family conflict be avoided?

What is your experience?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Thursday 18 November at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published. 

Do you care where your rubbish ends up?

Africa HYS team | 14:13 UK time, Tuesday, 16 November 2010

How does your town or city manage its rubbish?

 

 

For some 20 years now, Nairobi City Council has been struggling to cope with the amount of rubbish produced in the Kenyan capital.

The biggest dumpsite in the country has been located in Dandora, on the outskirts of the city, but now the council is to spend more than $7m (£4.7m) on turning it into a recreation park, and moving the dumpsite to Ruai, about 20 minutes drive from Dandora.

But does this mean the rubbish will be dealt with effectively? Do you care what happens with refuse once it leaves your house?

Do you find it difficult to dispose of your household waste?

Your Hajj stories

Ellen Otzen | 14:55 UK time, Monday, 15 November 2010

Thousands of African Muslims are now in Mecca in Saudi Arabia for the annual pilgrimage known as the Hajj. 

Many Africans save money for years and travel thousands of miles to make it. So we'd like to hear your stories about going on the Hajj. What challenges did you overcome to get there and what was the experience like?

If you've tried to reach Mecca without success, what obstacles were in your path?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Tuesday  16 November  at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

 

 

Who is responsible for 'baby dumping?'

AfricaHYS Team | 12:17 UK time, Thursday, 11 November 2010

South African Minister Patricia de Lille has held an emergency meeting to tackle the increase in the number of abandoned babies in the Western Cape.

She challenged the fathers to take more responsibility for their children.

'We urgently need to do something about the societal attitude of men towards fatherhood" she said.

"We must begin to empower men to take responsibility. Each time a woman abandons her child we must ask the question, have they already been abandoned themselves by the father of that child?'

Is this a problem where you are? Who do you think is responsible for ' baby dumping' on the continent?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Thursday  11 November  at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

Are Rastafarians misunderstood in Africa?

Africa HYS team | 12:37 UK time, Wednesday, 10 November 2010

When you hear the word Rastafarian, what do you think of?

BBC listener Bright Quaye-Sowah is a Rastafarian and feels that he and others like him are misunderstood.

The Ghanaian says he feels stigmatized because of his beliefs and way of life. 

"When children see me, they run away" he says.  

"The general public don't seem to like us, but we are all about love and loving one another".

The Rastafarian religion developed in Jamaica in the 1930's, but what do you know about it?

Are Rastafarians misunderstood where you are?  If so, why?

How can this stigma that Bright talks about be overcome?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Wednesday November 10 at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number.  It will not be published.

Are Rastafarians misunderstood in Africa?

Africa HYS team | 12:37 UK time, Wednesday, 10 November 2010

When you hear the word Rastafarian, what do you think of?

The Rastafarian religion developed in Jamaica in the 1930s, but what do you know about it?

 BBC listener Bright Quaye-Sowah is a Rastafarian and feels that he and others like him are misunderstood.

The Ghanaian says he feels stigmatised because of his beliefs and way of life. 

"When children see me, they run away," he says.  

"The general public don't seem to like us, but we are all about love and loving one another."

Are Rastafarians misunderstood where you are?  If so, why?

How can this stigma that Bright Quaye-Sowah talks about be overcome?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Wednesday November 10 at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number.  It will not be published.

Is social media affecting African politics?

Africa HYS team | 12:49 UK time, Tuesday, 9 November 2010

Are social media outlets such as Facebook, Youtube and blogs having an impact on politics in Africa?

 

BBC listener Sly Drewd in Uganda says a rap record using the voice of President Museveni is currently proving popular on websites like youtube.

His concern is about whether such use of social media sidelined the real meaning of what political campaigning should be about.

"Instead of raising awareness of ideals to be fulfilled, and issues to be overcome, the parties are busy churning out entertainment schedules instead" he says.

Do you agree with Sly?

Or do you think it's an effective way to be in touch with the electorate, or does it trivialise the political process?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Tuesday November 9 at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

Do Africa's sports stars need bonuses?

Africa HYS team | 19:26 UK time, Wednesday, 3 November 2010

Ghana's achievement in reaching the World Cup quarter-finals has been soured by a row over bonuses.

 

None of the players has received the $63,000 promised to each member of the Black Stars because of a procedural dispute with the Bank of Ghana.

It's not the first time that bonus money has caused problems in African sporting circles, the national teams of Togo, Cameroon, Nigeria and others have all been involved with arguments over money.

Mali's Football Federation recently suspended its regular bonuses for the national team because it was disappointed with its performance.

But should they be getting bonuses in the first place? Do the continent's top footballers earn more than enough from their clubs?  Shouldn't representing your country be enough of a reward?  

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Thursday November 4 at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

 

 

Are African poll results too slow ?

AfricaHYS Team | 13:26 UK time, Wednesday, 3 November 2010

Four days after they went to the polls, Ivorians await  the results of Sunday's presidential elections.

In Tanzania tension remains high after opposition supporters held protests in several parts of country at the slow pace of announcing the result of Sunday's general election.

Whilst countries have rules governing the handling and announcement of the electoral process, delayed  poll results in Africa often spark concerns about manipulation of results.

Frustrated voters point to countries such as USA, Britain and others parts of the world where election results are often known within 48 hours.

Should African election results be made quicker? If so why? How soon after elections do you want to know the results?  How can countries reform or improve their electoral system to get the results sooner?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on  Wednesday November 3 at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

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