Where I live

It's useful to be able to write about your home and local area – mein Zuhause – by giving a few details about where you and your family live.

My area

You may be asked the following question:

Wo wohnst du? – Where do you live?

Hilfsvokabeln– Helpful vocabulary

Here are some useful words and phrases to help you write about various locations.

  • ich wohne... – I live...
  • ich wohne mit meiner Familie... – I live with my family...
  • wir wohnen... – we live...
  • in einem Dorf – in a village
  • in einer Stadt – in a town
  • in einer Großstadt – in a city
  • auf einer Insel – on an island
  • in einem Vorort von... – in a suburb of...
  • auf dem Land – in the country
  • in den Bergen – in the mountains
  • an der Küste – on the coast
  • in der Nähe von – near to
Question

Write these sentences in German.

  • I live with my family in a suburb of Cardiff.
  • We live in a town on the coast.
  • My family lives near Liverpool.
  • I live with my family in a suburb of Cardiff. – Ich wohne mit meiner Familie in einem Vorort von Cardiff.
  • We live in a town on the coast. – Wir wohnen in einer Stadt an der Küste.
  • My family lives near Liverpool. – Meine Familie wohnt in der Nähe von Liverpool.
curriculum-key-fact
To add variety to your German, rather than using ich forms of the verb all the time, try and use some third person forms of verbs, eg er, sie (he, she) as well as some plural forms of verbs, eg wir, sie (we, they).

Did you know?

When US President John F Kennedy visited Berlin after the Second World War, he wanted to show solidarity with the citizens of Berlin by proudly announcing in German: Ich bin ein Berliner. He thought he was saying, 'I'm a Berliner' or 'I'm a person from Berlin', but unfortunately, because he used the word ein, by translating too rigidly from English, he effectively told them he was a doughnut.

How come? Well, in Germany, ein Berliner is a particular type of doughnut that's filled with marmalade or jam. But it's also the word for someone who comes from Berlin. The difference is that if you say you are from Berlin, you would just say ich bin Berliner, without using the word ein.

BBC journalist Matt Frei looks at the influence that US President John F Kennedy's visit had on Berlin (This clip is from: BBC TWO Berlin)