Multiple choice questions

Multiple choice questions are perhaps the easiest to complete, you simply put a cross in a box. However, the questions often have two answers that could, at first glance, be correct. Don’t make the mistake of reading the first answer and thinking this is correct without checking all the others.

If it says 'Tick one box', you must tick one box. If you leave it blank or tick two or more boxes you will get zero marks. These multiple choice questions will not start with command words like ‘describe’ or ‘explain’. They will be written in the form of a question like ‘What…?’ or ‘Why…?’

There will be more multiple choice questions on the Foundation paper.

This page contains AQA material which is reproduced by permission of AQA.

Sample Question 1 - Foundation

Question

When food is eaten, some of the radiation the food emits is detectable outside the body.

Which type of radiation would not be detectable outside the body? [1 mark]

Tick one box.

AAlpha
BBeta
CGamma
AAlpha
BBeta
CGamma

Alpha particles are stopped by skin alone so would not be able to penetrate the many layers of tissue in the body.

Sample Question 2 - Foundation

Question

The activity of a sample of potassium-40 is measured 3 times.

The measurements are given below.

4,906 Bq4,956 Bq4,889 Bq

Which of the following statements explains why the readings are different? [1 mark]

Tick one box.

ARadioactive decay is constant
BRadioactive decay is hazardous
CRadioactive decay is random
ARadioactive decay is constant
BRadioactive decay is hazardous
CRadioactive decay is random

As radioactive decay is random, repeated measurements are unlikely to be identical.

Sample Question 3 - Higher

Question

A nucleus is much smaller than an atom.

Approximately how many times smaller is a nucleus than an atom? [1 mark]

Tick one box.

A100
B1,000
C10,000
D100,000
A100
B1,000
C10,000
D100,000

A nucleus is 10,000 times smaller than an atom.