Multiple choice questions

Multiple choice questions appear throughout both exam papers, and at both foundation tier and higher tier. Multiple choice questions are usually asked as questions, often starting with 'what is...' or 'why...'.

You have three or four options to choose from in a multiple choice question. You must choose the number of options asked for in the question by placing ticks in boxes. Most multiple choice questions require just one tick, but a few ask for two ticks. You will not get a mark if you leave all the boxes blank, or if you put a tick in more than the required number of boxes.

Multiple choice questions often have two answers that could, at first glance, be correct. It is important to check all the answers before deciding which box to tick. It is also important to check that your chosen statement answers the question - some questions might include an option that is a correct statement, but that does not answer the question.

These questions have been written by Bitesize consultants as suggestions to the types of questions that may appear in an exam paper.

Sample question 1 - Foundation

Question

Figure 1 shows the structure of an element.

Figure 1

Covalent structure of graphite

What is the name of this element? [1 mark]

ACarbon
BChloride
CNitrogen
DXenon
ACarbon
BChloride
CNitrogen
DXenon

Sample question 2 - Foundation

Question

Why does the element in figure 1 conduct electricity? [1 mark]

AIt has delocalised electrons
BIt contains hexagonal rings
CIt has weak forces between the layers
DIt has ionic bonds
AIt has delocalised electrons
BIt contains hexagonal rings
CIt has weak forces between the layers
DIt has ionic bonds

Sample question 3 - Higher

Question

Table 1 shows some boiling point data.

SubstanceBoiling point
Water100°C
Methane-162°C

Which statement explains the data in the table? [1 mark]

AMethane has a lower boiling point than water
BThe intermolecular forces between the molecules in methane are weaker than the intermolecular forces between the molecules in water
CThe covalent bonds between the atoms in a water molecule are stronger than the covalent bonds between the atoms in a methane molecule
DThe covalent bonds between the atoms in a water molecule are weaker than the covalent bonds between the atoms in a methane molecule
AMethane has a lower boiling point than water
BThe intermolecular forces between the molecules in methane are weaker than the intermolecular forces between the molecules in water
CThe covalent bonds between the atoms in a water molecule are stronger than the covalent bonds between the atoms in a methane molecule
DThe covalent bonds between the atoms in a water molecule are weaker than the covalent bonds between the atoms in a methane molecule

Sample question 4 - Higher

Question

Which statement describes a limitation of the particle model? [1 mark]

AIn the model particles in a solid vibrate about fixed positions
BIn the model particles in a liquid are close together
CIn the model particles in liquids and gases have random arrangements
DIn the model there are no forces between particles
AIn the model particles in a solid vibrate about fixed positions
BIn the model particles in a liquid are close together
CIn the model particles in liquids and gases have random arrangements
DIn the model there are no forces between particles