Effect of exercise, nutrition and obesity on non-communicable diseases

Cardiovascular disease

Obesity leads to high blood pressure and the build-up of fatty deposits in the arteries, which leads to cardiovascular disease. It also increases the likelihood of developing diabetes, another risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Leading a healthy lifestyle by exercising regularly and eating a balanced diet reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease significantly.

Type 2 diabetes

A diet high in sugar affects the body's ability to use insulin. Type 2 diabetes is where the body's cells lose their sensitivity to insulin – they no longer respond, or respond less effectively, to the insulin that's produced.

Obesity accounts for 80 to 85 percent of the risk of type 2 diabetes. Rising obesity is linked with a 'western diet' – a diet that includes sugary 'fast foods' and an inactive lifestyle.

The bar charts show the increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes associated with people’s Body Mass Index.

The bar charts show the increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes associated with people's Body Mass Index (BMI). There is no cure for type 2 diabetes, but it may be possible to control it by diet and exercise.

Leading a healthy lifestyle by exercising regularly and eating a balanced diet reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes significantly.