How to become an engineering apprentice: Jasmine's story

Meet Jasmine, 20, from Crewe. Find out about life as an HS2 engineering apprentice at WSP. Part of our Bitesize world of work series.

"It's very important as a young black woman to have other BAME people join the engineering field. We need to gather different mindsets to solve the world's upcoming problems."

  • Jasmine believes that gaining practical experience is the best way to figure out which field of work is best for you
  • In her apprenticeship, she's currently working on the HS2 project which is focused on creating a new high-speed train route into London
  • Jasmine uses Maths to collect and analyse data on traffic and road systems and she uses English to write up her findings, which have to be clear and accurate.

What to expect if you want to be a civil engineer

As Jasmine says, engineering apprenticeships can open many career opportunities in engineering. Civil engineers design and manage construction projects, from bridges and buildings, to transport links (like the HS2 project) and sports stadiums.

  • Civil engineer salary: £24,000 to £80,000 per year
  • Civil engineer working hours: 40 to 42 hours per week
  • Entry requirements: A civil engineer degree apprenticeship will require five GCSEs (or equivalent) at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) and college qualifications like A-levels (or equivalent). If you want to go to university to study to be an engineer, you can do a foundation degree, higher national diploma or degree in Civil Engineering. Many universities specialise in particular areas of Civil Engineering, such as: Structural Engineering, Environmental Engineering, and Coastal Engineering.

This information is a guide (sources: LMI for All, National Careers Service)

For careers advice in all parts of the UK visit: England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales

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