World Agenda

Last updated: 7 october, 2010 - 14:43 GMT

The moment a Nato oil tanker exploded

The moment the explosion took place behind BBC Urdu's Ayub Tareen

The moment the explosion took place behind BBC Urdu's Ayub Tareen

BBC Urdu’s Ayub Tareen describes how his team responded when a large explosion went off behind him while he was reporting on the ambush of Nato oil tankers in Quetta, Pakistan.

I was doing a small camera video report for BBC Urdu, close to the terminal of Nato oil tankers, when suddenly there was a huge explosion.

Unknown militants had torched more than two dozen tankers parked at a terminal located in the outskirts of Quetta in the early hours of 6 October.

After getting information about the incident, I had rushed to the spot and started coverage.

Powerful impact

Suddenly, there was this huge noise in the background and my friend, cameraman Naseer Ahmed Kakar, ran and shouted: “There’s an explosion! There is explosion!”

I then rushed away from the scene. At that moment, I had been explaining the supply route that Nato took through an 850km stretch from Karachi into Afghanistan.

The strength of the explosion sent huge waves of fire into the air.

When I ran, I thought that perhaps flames were over my head. Then I fell down and tried to get up and run from the spot, but couldn’t do so given the impact.

Concerned colleagues

After the incident I continued working on the spot, but was forced to go to hospital by my concerned colleagues.

BBC Urdu's Ayub Tareen

My eyes were focused on the flames and thick black smoke hovering over my head, and I couldn’t see the ground.

Journalist colleagues came over and took me to the shelter of a nearby shop.

There they told me that I had suffered some hand and leg injuries during the blast. I’d also lost my two mobile sets.

After the incident I continued working on the spot, but was forced to go to hospital by my concerned colleagues.

Strengthened resolve

There was no ambulance on the spot, and police and frontier corps personnel had disappeared from the scene.

My colleagues repeatedly tried to approach the law enforcers for help, but they could not get any first aid for me.

A senior police officer that later came on duty gave me a tissue and a cup of tea.

I was then taken to Bolan Medical Complex Hospital by Nasser, who was voluntarily helping me to complete my piece to camera during the torching of the tankers.

There I was seen to by doctors and thankfully I was safe and sound.

Above all, the sympathy shown by my colleagues has strengthened my commitment and determination to work for the BBC.

Watch the video of Ayub click here

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