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T G Dawson
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
T G Dawson, killed 17th August 2000

 

Re: T G Dawson, MID WARWICKSHIRE COURT 30.5.2001

"The above is the reference I have used when writing to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), from the local branch, right up to the Solicitor General, over the past three years. It relates to the magistrates court that sentenced the man who killed my wife in a head-on collision – to a fine of £400 and four months suspension from driving.

It was on 17 August 2000, at 1000, a clear sunny morning.

After driving for 20 – 30 minutes, he drove to the wrong side of the road and collided head-on with my wife’s car at 70mph, my wife was travelling at 40/50mph. She died in hospital at about 1300, before I could get there.

The driver stated that he could not remember anything. Mr Lymm, the senior person at Warwickshire CPS stated that he had suffered from a momentary lapse of concentration. By calculation – the time from the moment he started to veer across the road until he hit my wife’s car was two seconds.

Since my wife’s death there have been several similar collisions resulting in deaths, which have therefore been reported in the national newspapers, thereby compelling the CPS to apply the charge of Dangerous Driving. One particular case was caught on camera and the time recorded for the duration of the collision was 1.98 seconds.

The inquest was held before the court hearing. The driver pleaded guilty to driving without due care and attention, so there was no hearing, merely the administration of sentence.

There are the memories of shared interests – music, golf, rambling holidays – none of which, when pursued now, fill the void left by the totally unexpected loss.

It is utterly impossible to describe one’s feelings of shopping for one, cooking for one, cleaning the house for one, meeting old friends alone, being alone for most of the time – no one there when going to bed or wakening, attending events that bring on the feeling of desolation all too often."

Roy Porter, husband.
 
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