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Last updated: 17 August, 2007 - Published 11:08 GMT
 
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The Twa: Rwanda's fogotten victims
 
Interahamwe fighter.
The Twa were forced to work for Hutu militias.
Most people will have heard about the Rwandan genocide in 1994 when an estimated 800,000 Rwandans were killed in 100 days - mostly ethnic Tutsis and moderate Hutus.

But many will be unaware of the Batwa, believed to be the oldest inhabitants of the forests of the Great Lakes Region of Africa comprising Rwanda, Burundi and Uganda.

The Twa, as they're known, also suffered during this tragedy. It's estimated that one in three of the Twa lost their lives during the genocide.

More than a decade on , they face an uncertain future after being forced off their land. Anthropologist Dr Luke Freeman visited them to hear their story:

Today, we hear about one school's efforts to address the problem of the loss of their culture.

After Dr. Freeman returned from the Great Lakes, The World Today spoke to him to find out a bit more about his visit.

First broadcast 15th August.

 
 
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