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Last updated: 24 february, 2011 - 18:19 GMT

The first protestor

Mannoubia Bouazizi, the mother of fruit vendor Mohamed Bouazizi, 29 January 2011. Photo: Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images

Mannoubia Bouazizi, the mother of fruit vendor Mohamed Bouazizi, 29 January 2011. Photo: Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images

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To many Tunisians, Mohammed Bouazizi has become both a martyr and a symbol of the fight for freedom, after his death sparked the protests in Tunisia - protests which have since spread across the Arab world.

Mohammed was a 26 year-old fruit seller who set himself on fire after the police confiscated his vegetable cart.

He died 19 days later in hospital.

Five thousand people attended his funeral, chanting political slogans calling for revenge for his suicide.

His death was seen as a catalyst for the protests over unemployment and poverty that eventually led to the resignation and exile of the country's President.

Outlook's Matthew Bannister spoke to Mohammed's younger sister, Samia, to find out more about her brother.

Interview first broadcast on 18 January 2011

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