Programmes

Last updated: 7 january, 2011 - 13:06 GMT

Haiti's 'baby factory'

A baby in the Isaie Jeanty Hospital in Port au Prince, Haiti

To play this content JavaScript must be turned on and the latest Flash player installed.

Play in either Real OR Windows Media players

As Haiti approaches the first anniversary of the massive earthquake that caused such devastation and took around 230 000 lives, it is now going through a baby boom.

The United Nations says the fertility rate tripled in the immediate aftermath of the disaster - possibly because of a lack of birth control.

The Isaie Jeanty maternity hospital in Port au Prince is known locally as the 'baby factory'.

Midwives say they have been delivering around 1200 babies a month.

The numbers have since gone down, but the hospital corridors are still bursting with expectant mothers, and cholera has been making life more difficult.

In the latest in his series of reports from Haiti for Outlook, Mike Thomson met the midwives, mothers and babies at the hospital.

Inside Haiti's 'baby factory'

  • A desperately ill baby that was abandoned by its mother after being born prematurely, weighing only one kilogram.
    A desperately ill baby that was abandoned by its mother after being born prematurely, weighing only one kilogram.
  • Women in beds in the busy maternity ward.
    Women in beds in the busy maternity ward.
  • Medecins Sans Frontieres Project Coordinator Tara Newell cradling abandoned baby Leo, who has become popular with staff.
    Medecins Sans Frontieres Project Coordinator Tara Newell cradling abandoned baby Leo, who has become popular with staff.
  • Midwife Felipe Rojas Lopez in a room full of seriously ill newborn babies.
    Midwife Felipe Rojas Lopez in a room full of seriously ill newborn babies.
  • 15 year old Angeline - pregnant and waiting to give birth in the hospital corridor.
    15 year old Angeline - pregnant and waiting to give birth in the hospital corridor.

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.