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Last updated: 26 november, 2009 - 18:13 GMT

StoryCorps & Your Best Listener

An organisation called StoryCorps wants people across the United States to record a conversation with someone important to them - a friend, a family member or a colleague.

It is all part of one of the most ambitious oral history projects ever undertaken in the US.

The organisers are urging people to mark the National Day of Listening on Friday 27 November by taking part in the project.

The aim is to build up a collection of thousands of conversations recorded by ordinary Americans, which will then be placed in the Library of Congress.

People can record their own conversations at home, or use Storybooths - small recording studios in big cities, or special mobile studios in caravans.

The man behind all this is Dave Isay.

A StoryCorps sound booth

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Dave spoke to Matthew Bannister from his office in New York. He explained what inspired StoryCorps and also played us a conversation between Seymour Gottlieb, who has Alzheimer's Disease, and his wife Marcia, who spoke about being together for 60 years.

Your Best Listener

Outlook would like to know and see, who your best listener is.

We would like you to send us a photo of you with your best listener.

Who do you tell your troubles to? Who lends a sympathetic ear when you are feeling down? Or who do you run to when you want to share excitement about some great development in your life?

It does not have to be a high quality picture - you could just snap it on a mobile phone.

Email it to outlook@bbc.com and we will create a montage of you and your best listener on our website.

Dave and Matthew have started the ball rolling. You can see them here with their best listeners - their wives.

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