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The Vienna Declaration confirmed the universality of human rights

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Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action

   
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World Conference and the Vienna Declaration


The World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna in 1993 confirmed the universality of human rights, refuting those who argued that human rights were not universal but historically, socially and politically contextual and contingent.

On 25 June 1993, representatives of 171 States adopted the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action of the World Conference on Human Rights, thereby successfully closing the two-week conference and presenting a plan for the strengthening of human rights work around the world.

The Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action marked the culmination of a long process of review over the current status of human rights in the world.

It also marked the beginning of a renewed effort to strengthen and further implement human rights instruments that have been constructed on the foundation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) since 1948.

  • The universal nature of all human rights and fundamental freedoms is beyond question

  • All human rights are universal, indivisible and interdependent and inter-related

It also confirmed a role for international action to promote and protect human rights:

The promotion and protection of all human rights and fundamental freedoms must be considered as a priority objective of the United Nations in accordance with its purposes and principles, in particular the purpose of international co-operation, in the framework of these purposes and principles, the promotion and protection of all human rights is a legitimate concern of the international community."

 

 

 

 

It also stated:

While the significance of regional and national particularities and various historical, cultural and religious backgrounds must be borne in mind, it is the duty of states, regardless of their political, economic and cultural systems, to promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms.""

 

 

 

 

To read the full text on the UN website click here.

 

   
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