Last updated: 30 march, 2010 - 17:15 GMT

Cern scientists celebrate Large Hadron Collider success

A monitor showing the first ultra high-energy collisions is seen at the CMS experiment control room of the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) on March 30, 2010 near Geneva

One of the scientists involved described it as the beginning of a new era

Scientists at the world's largest particle accelerator have successfully collided beams of protons at the highest energy levels ever seen.

There was cheering in the control room at Cern, the European nuclear research centre in Switzerland, as one of the biggest and most complicated scientific experiments got fully underway.

The experiment is seen as a major breakthrough in efforts to understand the fundamental nature of the universe.

The BBC's science correspondent, Matt McGrath, was there and spoke to Dr Tulika Bose from Boston Univeristy.

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Professor Brian Cox is a particle physicist and a member of the High Energy Physics group at the University of Manchester, and he works on the Large Hadron Collider.

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First broadcast 30 March 2010

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