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Last updated: 5 february, 2010 - 18:23 GMT

One of the world's oldest languages dies

Photograph of Boa Sr released by Survival International shows Boa Sr, the last speaker of "Bo", one of the 10 Great Andamanese languages, on the Andaman and Nicobar Islands

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The death of an 85-year-old woman in the Andaman islands, part of India but physically closer to Indonesia, has marked the death of an entire language.

'Boa Sr' was the last speaker of the Bo language thought to have been spoken by the Bo tribe for up to 65,000 years.

The story of her language is not an unusual one.

Out of the roughly 6,000 languages spoken in the world, about half of them are in danger.

Nicholas Ostler, Chairman of the Foundation for Endangered Languages, tells Roger Hearing that the Bo language is historically important.

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First broadcast 05 February 2010

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