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Last updated: 06 July, 2007 - Published 06:53 GMT
 
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Your favourite teacher
 

 
 
A teacher in her class in Nigeria

As part of the Teachers in Africa season, members of the BBC African Service have told us about the teachers who have had a profound affect on their lives.

Do you have fond memories of a teacher from your formative years? Do you have a favourite teacher, one who really inspired you? Why not tell us about them? Simply send us your memories via the form on the right and we'll publish a selection of your contributions below.


Mr. Francois Lovasier Twinomugisha

Until the time when I entered Standard seven at Kiyaga Primary School, Bushenyi District in Western Uganda, I could hardly speak or write English. The teachers who taught us before were less committed to their work. Mr. Twinomugisha was quick to realise I needed help and by the time I realised what was happening....like it was with other pupils....we were friends. We looked at him as a special person and it really shocked us when he boldly told us in class that several of us were indeed much cleverer than he was.
I am now a high school teacher of the English Language I feared most and had given up about as well as Literature in English because of this gentleman. Iam also doing International Relations and Diplomatic Studies at Makerere University because of the combative spirit he planted in me. Meanwhile, the fighter in Mr. Twinomugisha could not keep him at the primary school level. He worked his way through Kyambogo and Makerere Universities and is now a Senior High School teacher of history and French at Maryhill High School in Western Uganda, one of the schools reknown for producing the most well focused and refined ladies in the region....does this surprise you with the likes of Mr. Twinomugisha around? BRAVO MR.TWINOMUGISHA....thank you for making us what we are! GOD BLESS YOU!!
Satu Johnmary Turyaheebwa, Kampala, Uganda

Ms. Joyce Mururi

Ms. Mururi was a teacher at Chinhoyi High School in Zimbabwe. She always went above and beyond her Geography class. She taught me that I could be anything I wanted and I should "never let your current situation determine your future - the world is all yours for the taking". She taught me what it means to give of oneself. Twenty-seven years later, she still holds a special place in my heart.
Teresa Dangwa, New York, USA

Mr. A.M.Lahai

My favourite teacher is Mr. A.M.Lahai. He inspired me to take life vey serious. He devoted his time to his students, go extra mile to actually go to the parents to encourage them to send their children to school. He was very strict, but fair, no nonsence teacher. He became my role model in life, very gentle in relating his principles of achievement to the student.
Suliaman Karvon, Tikonko, Sierra Leone

Mr. Anane-Mensah

 The entire school knew and admired his booming voice that brought assembly closer to a magnificent military parade
 

Mr. Anane-Mensah of Christ The King School made me a student fearless of discipline, hard work and success. Most importantly, he exemplified everything he preached. The entire school knew and admired his booming voice that brought assembly closer to a magnificent military parade. Yet he was the kindliest and most God-fearing soul alive. My story is not unique; countless students were transformed through him and it became every parent's dream to see their children in his class.
Ruth Botsio, Accra, Ghana

Mr. Bendu

I will never forget Mr. Bendu of the Ansarul Secondary School in Kenema, Sierra Leone. He was very strict and was determined to let us know how to speak and write good English. One striking feature about Mr. Bendu was that he was very time conscious, and perhaps, one of his hobbies was to correct both pupils and teachers who spoke bad English. That is bad English, he usually told pupils and his colleague teachers who were always very careful about what to say whenever Mr. Bendu was around. Although I must say some teachers did not like him for correcting their bad English, especially in the presence of pupils, we liked him very much because he always encouraged us to speak and write good English. Alice Cole, Kenema, Sierra Leone

Mrs. W. Musita

I have memories of my English Literature teacher Mrs. W. Musita exhorting students to look at literature differently. Whether we were reading Romeo and Juliet or an anthology of African short stories, she made it all so 'real'. Aside from the literature lessons, she also instilled in us a passion for social justice- she saw each student as a human being regardless of their background. Seeing her coax an answer out of the quietest member of my class was a reminder that everyone has an opinion, and the right to voice it. Being incredibly modest, she would probably downplay the impact she has had on my life, but to me, she embodies all that a good teacher should be. I'm glad more students at Alliance Girls' High School get to take her class!
Wambui Ngugi, Vancouver, Canada

Padmore Agbemabiase

Padmore Agbemabiase, formerly of Awudome Secondary School, Tsito , Ghana, openned my sixth sense, as a student far back in 1990. My interest in literature has never waned. The man can teach literature with so much passion.And his indepth knowledge of the subject is unparrallel. I last met him when he was just about to leave Ghana for the States, where I understand he is pursuing a third degree, as well as teaching. I'd love to contact Padmore one day.
George Yeboah, London, UK

Mr Frank Mateyu

In my Secondary school days there was one teacher whom I liked and he inspired me alot. He was late, Mr Frank Mateyu, he used to teach us History and English at Jr secondary level. He was such an entertaining teacher, during his lessons none of us in class got bored because of the way he used to teach. I always remember him when he was teaching us history about early man, "the Zinjathropas" his style of teaching was in a class of his own, he made us listen with interest about ancient times and made us understand History better.
Hilda Msuku, Blantyre, Malawi

Mr. J. Emmanuel Makate
My one and only teacher who i will never and ever forget is Mr. J. Emmanuel Makate. Mr. Makate taught me Geography, he taught me to be hamble and give me voracious appetite for learning. Where ever you mr. Makete you still remain fresh in memories.
Mohamed Donzo, Perth, Australia

Teacher Allotey

 He was the first person to instill in me that one could do anything if one work hard at it
 

The memories I have of Teacher Allotey, from Aboso, Ghana, are still fresh in my mind after about 20 years since he taught me. He was the first person to instill in me that one could do anything if they work hard at it, and he made sure that all pupils he taught worked hard. He turned me around from my disinterest in school to become a studious student. I owe a lot to him.
Ebenezer Amposah, Portland, USA

Mr Eriki

Mr Eriki was my primary six teacher in 1979 in ivbi-ele primary school, edo state nigeria. I never knew his first name but he was a young man and a great stamerer though it never affected his duties,he was very dedicated and hardworking, he made me sit in the front row of the class, each day in class started with a quiz section while all pupils are standing, a correct answer permits you to sit while a wrong one earned you some hot strokes, this made us to always update our knowledge. He brought for six of us (best students) admission forms to federal government college; schools we never knew existed because we were in a very remote village. my father who was an illiterate with anti-education disposition especially for female children. wherever he went he was often told that it would be to his shame if he was unable to send me to school. this changed his perception and instead of me being married out at an early age i proceeded to secondary school. Today to the glory of God i am a medical doctor!. i don't really know where my favourite teacher is today but wherever he may be GOD BLESS MR ERIKI.
Arafat Ifemeje, Ibadan, Nigeria

Mrs Kobba

I want to thank God for my primary school teachers who have me the foundation to reach my university stage. Each time I'm in Bo were I attended Primary sch.I always pay my best teacher a visite and give her what ever I have as a sign of appreciations for what she did for me for which I will remain greatful. I 'm more than happy b coz she all still remember me up to date. Her name is Mrs Kobba.
Moses Seiwoh, Freetown, Sierra Leone

Mr. Geofrey Runyindo

Some times I look at my self and wonder how I joined University, these memories still fresh in my brain. It was in primary six and seven respectively, I was on my way to stop schooling due to my hate towards the so called prefects , who were not only hush but valgar and nagging.My math teacher called Mr. Geofrey Runyindo read this I think from my ways of living at school , he called me in the staff room and gave me some encouraging advices which I had never forgotten up to now. "I think you know who your father was, how he was respected and how important was to this society..." I looked down and recalled .Then he asked me to leave school if I have decided so, I went out all broaken into peaces.I had to stand and finish the two years . Since then I picked interest with school now I'm at a ugandan prestigeous university which any one dream off. He helped me so much. A big thanks to him.
Musika Stodart, Kampala, Uganda

Jah Cisco Weah "THE HEAT"

I will never forget prof. Jah Cisco Weah "THE HEAT" as he was popularly called in D-Twe high school in Monrovia. he was a man with lot of encouragement,I remember him distributing copy books among students at his own expense to encourage students remain in school in 1991 when the war was still rageing. his popular saying was the heat is on but don't give up. Thus giving us hope for the future when young people were to choose between gun and school.
Smith Julius, Zwedru, Liberia

Mr. D.L. Patel

In primary school, I was just average when it came to mathematics. Indeed I managed grade c in my final exams. However when I joined Ofafa Jericho Secondary school in 1974, the new mathematics teacher Mr. D.L. Patel, Lord Rest his soul in peace, made me develop a keener interest in the subject. But Patel was not only a maths teacher, he was equally interesting. Students nicknamed him Majee, a corruption of mzee, a Kiswahili word for an old man. He was quite advanced in age but a great mathematician. He had a hand made abacus of bottle tops with which he demonstrated to the class. This ensured whatever he taught sank into our little heads. He was equally a very strict teacher. If for instance a student dropped a pencil or a ruler on the floor, that was a punishable offence. Indeed this was the greatest offence one could commit during the maths session. We all feared and tried as much as possible not to drop anything that would disturb the serenity. Woe unto you if ! you dropped something. He would shout from wherever he was, Stand up the rascal, stand up the rascal as he approached the offending student. I once inadvertently fell a victim by dropping a ruler and still got the full wrath that went with the offence. To Majee, dropping a pencil or a ruler distracted the other students from following and getting the sums methodology. His strictness helped us to give him our rapt attention during lessons and in turn made us understand what he was putting a cross. Such was his character. But believe me; he was one of the most liked teachers on the compound by students who enjoyed imitating him at the slightest opportunity- of course out of ear shot. He inspired me to become a good mathematician, eventually landing a job with a leading International Bank in Kenya.
James Omedo Kihali, Nakuru, Kenya

Teacher Amina

 She taught me how to hold a pencil, write and read those beautiful letters with bellies, arms, legs and heads
 

I have had so many wonderful teachers but my favourite teacher was Teacher Amina sometimes referred to as Miss Amina in my primary one. She taught me how to hold a pencil, write and read those beautiful letters with bellies, arms, legs and heads. Teacher Amina used to say that we do not just write, we write letters well and with a meaning so that we can enjoy reading what we have written. I have grown up addicted to writing and reading anything as long as it makes meaning. I use every opportunity I get to teach any child how to write and read because I believe that is the best gift you can give to someone. Everyday I wake up, either to communicate to anyone around the world, I try my best to do it well and meaningfully, even when I meet children that I am supposed to pass on Teacher Aminas gift to, I do it with joy.
Prossy, Uganda

Mr Williams

I attended a very strict Catholic boys' secondary school in Bo, Sierra Leone. The teachers never smiled to you but there was this French teacher called Mr Williams. He knew we were finding it difficult to understand French. He started composing songs for us from the lectures. It was so interesting that other students were sneaking other classes to attend the French class. He became so popular in the school. We loved him but unfortunately he vied for the principle's job but didn't get it. He left and after that no student was interested in French lessons. Mr Williams, I still miss you.
Magnus Fortune-Wright, Loughborough, Uk

Mr. Odo

My favourite teacher was my JSS III mathematics teacher Mr. Odo at Boys Sec. School Ezzamgbo, Abakaliki Nigeria. He is very intelligent and friendly. Mr Odo has a friendly way of making a difficult subject easy. He is one of the few who would stand before their students and admit he is not very sure of an answer he gave and would provide the real answer in a subsequent class. He is an awesome teacher.
Ngwoke Kenneth Gerald, Belfast , UK


Mr Tesfaye

My favourite teacher is Mr Tesfaye at Bole Community School. He taught me English and was also my home-teacher for both grade 7 and 8. I must admit that I am having a great difficulty writing this little paragraph, in fear of disappointing him with its quality. He gave me a lot of confidence and prepared me for life at that young age. It is my sincere hope that when I head back home some day that I will find him and kiss his knees (sign of utmost respect in Ethiopian culture) for all I have become in life. Thank you, Teacher Tesfaye.
Dr. Yoseph Gabre Kristos Mekonnen, Denver, Colorado. USA

Mrs Wainmbah

My best teacher was Mrs Wainmbah, she taught me in class 1 in the St Jude's primary school in Fundong. This woman taught me especially how to spell my name in a special way (by singing). The first time i presented a poem in school, starting by singing my name, the entire school body laughed and each time i passed around, i was asked to stand and say my name, which of course i did by singing. I'll forever remember her especially given that most children learnt how to spell their names only when they were already in class 3 or 4.Thank you "mama" as we called her affectionately.
Nora Atah, Douala-Cameroon

Mr Magaya
My favourite teacher was my English Literature teacher in Secondary school. His name was Mr Magaya and he was blind. He was a great teacher, he had a way with words that could make even reading the most boring book exciting. He encouraged us to work hard and read. He put a love for books in my heart, its because of him that I appreciate literature today and that I decided to became a writer. He always reminded us that the greatest tragedy in life is people who have sight, but no vision. He challenged us to have a vision and purpose for our life. I am forever grateful to him because he taught me the reading culture and the quest for knowledge.
Sharon Mazingaizo, Harare, Zimbabwe

Mr. D.L. Patel

In primary school, I was just average when it came to mathematics. Indeed I managed grade c in my final exams. However, when I joined Ofafa Jericho Secondary school in 1974, the new mathematics teacher Mr. D.L. Patel, Lord Rest his soul in peace, made me develop a keener interest in the subject. But Patel was not only a math's teacher, he was equally interesting. Students nicknamed him Majee, a corruption of mzee, a Kiswahili word for an old man. He was quite advanced in age but a great mathematician. He had a hand made abacus of bottle tops with which he demonstrated to the class. This ensured whatever he taught sank into our little heads. He was equally a very strict teacher. If for instance a student dropped a pencil or a ruler on the floor, that was a punishable offence. Indeed this was the greatest offence one could commit during the math's session.

 Woe unto you if you dropped something. He would shout from wherever he was, "Stand up the rascal, stand up the rascal"
 

We all feared and tried as much as possible not to drop anything that would disturb the serenity. Woe unto you if you dropped something. He would shout from wherever he was, "Stand up the rascal, stand up the rascal" as he approached the offending student. Depending on how he saw and judged you, he would deliver a devastating slap to your face. If he read mischief in your act, then you received the full punishment. Sometimes he would just pat the offender on the back and tell him/her don't do it ok, don't do it. On other occasions the offending student would not own up. In such circumstances Majee would shout looking from side to side, "The neighbour should tell, the neighbour should tell. Who is the rascal"? If the neighbour was coward enough and gave you away, then the slap was swift and terribly terrific. I once inadvertently fell a victim by dropping a ruler and still got the full wrath that went with the offence. To Majee, dropping a pencil or a ruler distracted the other students from following and getting the sum's methodology. His strictness helped us to give him our rapt attention during lessons and in turn made us understand what he was putting a cross. Such was his character. But believe me; he was one of the most liked teachers on the compound by students who enjoyed imitating him at the slightest opportunity- of course out of ear shot. He inspired me to become a good mathematician, eventually landing a job with a leading International Bank in Kenya
James omedo kihali, Nakuru, Kenya

Mr Chung peter

Mr favorite teacher is Mr Chung peter who taught me in Class seven ( primary school).Once i was not able to raise the money that i needed for transportation to attend inerview for entry in to secondary school, he paid it for me. That is how i got to secondary school and who/what ever i am today is thanks to this God sent man Mr. Chung Peter. I owe this man all my academic successes.
Nshom Ernest Bah, Mbingo Cameroon

Mr Sayid Ahmed Ramadan

My favourite teacher was called Mr Sayid Ahmed Ramadan he was Egyptian. My Favourite Teacher is an opportunity to recognise and reward. He always encouraged us to tell the truth. For instance, if you have not done the homework, you need not lie. He allows for mistakes - saying, you can't be perfect all the time. But you should strive for it. God Bless you.......Djibouti
Abdirahman Haybe Djama, Hyderbad, India
Mr. Kosha

Teachers are the ones who have made all of us who we are today. Bank Managers, politicians, engineers, Accountants and many more fields, we all passed through teachers. But i wonder why teachers in most cases are not remunerated so that they are motivated. Instead what we hear is that teachers are leaving for other countries for greener pastures. I think it is high time we started thinking and acting on motivating our teachers. If we motivate our teachers even the quality of education will improve in the end the countries economies will improve. I personally remember Mr. Kosha from Mukuba secondary school in Kitwe, who was teaching book keeping and principles of Accounting at my all level stage. Up to now am working as an accountant and using the same basics he showed me! Fortunately enough MR. Kosha is still teaching at the same school. I meet him sometimes whenever am visiting the same place were the school is situated. Long live all the teachers!!!
Gady Mwamba Museka, Mazabuka, Zambia

Mr Solomon Ntuli

My favourite teacher was Mr Solomon Ntuli we used to call him Mphemba, he was my maths & physics teacher in matric @ St Lewis Bertrands High School. He was my inspiration to always try and do better. When I was In Varsity he was the first person I would show my results to, unfortunately he passed away before I graduated.
Bongani, Newcastle, South Africa

Mr Ramjan and Mr L Naidoo

My favourite teachers were Mr Ramjan and Mr L Naidoo at Risecliff Secondary in KZN, South Africa. Mr Naidoo was my history teacher and he was inspirational. Mr Ramjan was my English teacher and he was thought-provoking, with crazy far-out ideas that only proved to inspire me.
Seema, GA, USA

MR.FODAY CAMARA

 And as long as this plight of teachers continues in Africa, the UN goal to eradicate illiteracy in Africa will still be a long miserable journey to accomplish
 

Everyone who once attended school must have a teacher who inspired him or her. In my case MR.FODAY CAMARA is one of them. I could remember how he guided me towards one of the most then difficult exam that scares the hell out of every primary six pupil in West Africa at that time. This exam was the common entrance exam which allows pupils at that grade to continue to High School if they ever pass. He was also the first teacher who advised me to write and read as much as I can. The first article I wrote in my life was published at the local paper organised by teachers just few months after his coaching. Today I am a freelance writer thank God for it was after all MR. FODAY CAMARA's heroic efforts that helped me to a successful career today. BBC recent attempt to explore the teachers' plight in Africa is a very important issue which many African leaders fail to consider. And as long as this plight of teachers continued in Africa particularly in my own country the Gambia, not much could be achieved and the goal of the UN to eradicate illiteracy in Africa will still be a long miserable journey to accomplish. I am lucky to have teachers like Mr Camara a man I will never forget for the rest of my life.
Tijan Nimaga , Bronx New York

Moses K.M Togba

My favourite Teachers are Moses K.M Togba who taught me physics and Smith Flomo who also taught me mathematics in high school and through their excellent performance, I am currently studying physics as my major and mathematics as my minor in the University of Liberia and I am absolutely grateful to them and remain appreciative where ever we interface.
Mohammed Konneh, Monrovia, Liberia

over here in Egypt the teachers gains a lot of money as they work after school in private classes which cost so much, so they don't want to abandon their profession . there are many teachers who affected me , but there's one was my life's teacher, he was math teacher, I had got full marks in this subject till I graduated, since I was 8 years old till now no body affected in but him learnt me how to take every thing easy but seriously , he still like my guide in my life i hope him a good life and a good health , god bless him
ryad sallam, Cairo

Mr Usman

My favourite teacher was one Mr Usman. In my sixth year in primary school (in the mid nineties) Mr Usman took us Social Studies and in his lessons he made us aware of the nature of the black man's underdevelopment been very much connected with the way he paid psychological obeisance to the white man... I cannot speak for the other pupils but since then I have been able to be conscious enough to fight subservience to the white man in any form¿ I'm not saying I'm racist, but, to put it bluntly, I no longer think the white man is a god! I owe my thoughts, in part, to Mr Usman...
Benjamin Tarachi, Minna, Nigeria

Dr. Tetemke Mehari

My favourite teacher is Dr. Tetemke Mehari, in Addis Ababa University. He taught me one biochemistry course. What really I liked from him was he made the course very interesting in such a way that easily grasped by students. He really connected the theory to the real world. You will be angry when the class ends. The class is funny and the teacher is easy for everybody to talk and discuss with.
yididya, Mekelle, Ethiopia

My favourite teacher is Mr Gabriel Gbedema. He taught at primary six some 23 years ago. No doubt, he later became the head teacher of the school until his retirement. Mr Gbedema wasn't too strict but he had his own ways of winning over his pupils. He was a father rather than a teacher. He once told us in class that 'if an examination is difficult for you, then it is difficult for all other examinees'. His calm persona coupled with his humility had endeared him to all and sundry. May he live to be 100!
Francis white yao loloh, Accra, Ghana

Mrs Dondolo

My favourite teacher is Mrs Dondolo, she is the principal of St Boniface High School. She is dedicated, and has a deep affection for her students. Her care for the less privileged in her school is overwhelming. In South Africa where students discipline is little bit low, she has tried very hard to keep the discipline of the school high. The school always have more than 90% on their matric result. The most important thing about her, is taking every contribution of her teachers while making decisions concerning the development of the school and the students.
Osuigwe Chukwuemeka, A Nigerian In Kimberley South Africa

Mr REM Ohiomokhare

Mr REM Ohiomokhare (the pioneer principal of Boys Model Secondary school, Evboneka) has been the biggest influence when it comes to favourite teacher. He was feared, respected and his voice was like thunder but with good lessons. His all grey hair can never be missed and so were he valuable lessons. Though he was hated then, I (and others) now realise that he was the best mentor anyone could ask for. His advice and lessons still ring in my head and they have made me a better man today. I will forever be grateful for been one of your pioneer students.
Esebamen Xerviar Omeime, Sundsvall, Sweden

MRS ARMSTRONG

MY FAVOURITE TEACHER AT KAMWALA SECONDARY SCHOOL IN LUSAKA, ZAMBIA WAS MRS.ARMSTRONG. SHE TAUGHT ME ENGLISH & ENGLISH LITERATURE. WE NEVER HAD A DULL MOMENT IN HER CLASS. SHE WAS A DYNAMIC & DEDICATED TEACHER. FORMER PRESIDENT KENNETH KAUNDA HONOURED HER FOR HER SERVICES TO ZAMBIA.
ISMAIL LUNAT, NEW YORK, USA

Mrs Leah Bumbo

 She used to drive a Volvo with number plate Oklahoma is OK
 

My best teacher was Mrs Leah Bumbo. She was an English teacher and has just come back from the USA with a degree in English. She used to drive a Volvo with number plate Oklahoma is OK. I used to love her very much especially when she told us stores of America. I used to write good English composition and sometimes she would pick me to read my essay to all the students in the class. I always wanted to come to the USA because of her stories I hope one day to see her again.
Joseph Wangugi, Columbus, USA

Mr Mmapen-Dare

MY FAVOURITE TEACHER CALLED MR. MMAPEN-DARE. HE WAS A MATHEMATICS TEACHER IN MY SENIOR SECONDARY FIVE (5). ONE THING THAT CAME TO MY MEMORY WAS, WE ARE NOT IN GOOD TERMS A MONTH BEFORE MY FINAL SEMESTER. HE DENIED ME ENTRANCE INTO HIS CLASS AND EVEN PROMISED THAT, I WILL FAIL MATHEMATICS. WITH THAT IN MIND, I WENT ABOUT CONSULTING DIFFERENT MATHEMATIC TEACHERS IN DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. OUR SCANDAL MAKES ME TO READ AND PRACTICE MATHEMATICS VERY WELL AND BEYOND SYLLABUS. AT THE END OF OUR FINAL YEAR, I BECAME THE FIRST A2 STUDENT WHOM PASSED MATHEMATICS. SINCE THEN, HE CONGRATULATED ME AND SHAKED HAND WITH ME AND EVEN RECOMMENDED ME AT THE TIME OF PURSUING ADMISSION INTO NIGERIAN UNIVERSITIES. WE BECAME FRIENDS AND AT TIMES, HE INVITED ME TO COME AND LECTURE HIS STUDENTS ON HIS BEHALF. ONE FUNNY THING, HE ASKED ME TO MARRY HIS SECOND DAUGHTER. SO, I WOULDN'T HAVE SCORED HIGHER WITHOUT HIM AND TODAY, MATHS IS MY COURSE OF STUDIES.
Yusuf Yebbi, Ganye-Adamawa, Nigeria

MY MOTHER WAS MY FAVOURITE TEACHER SHE TAUGHT ME HOW TO READ AND WRITE ALL OTHERS ARE JUST SUPPORT AND BACK-UP SHE IS MY HERO
SOLADE NICOL, Canada

My two favourite teachers. 1) The lovely Ghanaian lady who taught me to speak English well, in a very 'unNigerian' way. I owe a lot to her - nobody understands the Nigerian accent, and thanks to her, I don't have that. She is a gem. 2) My maths teacher, who spent countless hours going over the intricacies of geometry with me. Sadly, she died a year after I left secondary school. Bless her! Teachers are worth more than gold!
Adenike Titilope, PA, USA

Dr. Said

My favourite teacher definitely was Dr. Said...He is the Dean of mathematics Dept. in AAU and he is one of the craziest and most talented teacher I ever met. He always starts his lectures with a very slow voice and in the middle his voice will be as loud as a rocket! He takes life easily and taught me how far one can go in his/her accomplishments by taking life easily....Success is always in every one of us but what we are is the one thing which must be protected forever! Abi,USA
Abi, Ethiopian

"Inspired"? How about "pivotal"? Alfred "Are you ready" Manneh, St Augustine's High School, Banjul. History teacher par excellence. One in a million.
Arthur, UK

Paul Apuss

My most favourite teacher was Paul Apuss, the former head Master of Napata secondary school in Kakuma refugee Camp in Northern Kenya and my English language teacher, Paul was a kind of teacher that with amiable personality, despite the lowest payment in the Camp his aim was to teach children. He make joke before teaching, after classes every student remained with excitement and encouragement not to fail Paul's subject. fun is the key way to attach student minds in learning. unfortunately he died three years ago in Southern Sudan, I missed him so much. May Almighty God rest his soul in peace.
Abot Chuol-tor, Juab, Southern Sudan

Pius Sama

 He had such a good heart; he encouraged his pupils to study hard; he gave good advice; he was not feared but respected
 

It is easy to remember good teachers and difficult to remember the not-so-good ones. For me, my best teacher is undoubtedly Pius Sama, retired headteacher of St. Mary School Balikumbat, Cameroon. I always daydream and see his writing on the blackboard. I learned to write from him. He had such a stylish way of writing. That is not all. He had such a good heart; he encouraged his pupils to study hard; he gave good advice; he was not feared but respected unlike teachers of those days; he was a good Christian; he was intelligent; and above all he was real wise man. He was just a fine, clean man and a good example that is needed in today's Cameroon. Pa Sama, I feel proud to have been taught by you. I am very happy I became a teacher to take it on from where you left it. I vividly remember the evening you announced to me that I had passed the Common Entrance Examination to go to college. Though I am thousands of miles away, I still think of you and wish to see you in the days ahead. I hope you are listening. May God bless you!
George Viche Akom, Kalamazoo, USA

René Kibonsa Sisa Mayuku

My favourite teacher, who has already passed off, was my French, music, civic, politics and humanity teacher. He was also the school discipline director. He was not only our bodyguard at school, but also a real Gestapo officer in his students' life in the city of Lukala in the province of Central Kongo, in the DR Congo. He was the teacher all the students hated, but twenty years later, I understood that he was the only one who introduced me to the real world of knowledge: all my reading tastes come from him. That's the reason why was René Kibonsa Sisa Mayuku is now my unique hero.
Pascal Mieluzeyi, Montreal, Canada

Mr Femi Komolafe

My favourite teacher was called Mr Femi Komolafe he taught me in secondary school and he had this way of teaching that was quite different from the others it was a government school but he was the gentle type he taught me English language and I'll be forever grateful to him for the way I pronounce my words. Unfortunately he died just before my Waec exams how I missed him.
Percy Richard, Kaduna, Nigeria

Brother Henry Mcgann

I am what I am today because of Br Henry Mcgann, an Irish Christian Brother, who was not only the proprietor and Principal of Our Lady of Fatima High School, but also the father and teacher of all.

Br Henry always saw the best in all students and would go the extra mile to make one what one ought to be.

I was the shy type but Br Henry saw a lot of hidden talents in me which he never wasted in exploiting. He would always make me do things I never thought I could do like impromptu speeches, conducting the school assembly and appointing me class prefect.

The greatest shock of my life, which later became a turning point in my life at a tender age of 17, was when he had me nominated for the position of School Head Boy; a position I eventually contested and won.

Since then I have never looked back in my life and the phrase "I can't" is not in my vocabulary.

Most of the things he taught us in Literature in English and English Liturature at Fatima High School became a revision exercise when we went to university.That's what a great teacher does; Always taking you ahead of others. Bravo to all teachers more so those who have made me what I am today.

Besenty Gomez, Kitty Village in The Gambia

Mr Anyang 'Simple' Sammy

I remember Mr Anyang 'Simple' Sammy. I cannot still remember where the 'Simple' cropped up from.

Mr 'Simple' Sammy, as we popularly called him, was neat. Yes, I mean he clearly epitomized what was the best of sanitation in my early years.
I remember his black shoes permanently oiled until it radiated brilliance, his trousers well pressed with charcoal iron and his shirt with a tie to match distinctly clean from the rest of the other school staff.

Did you know
Every year in Kenya, more teachers die of Aids than are trained in teacher training institutions
Remy 2006

From these my early years of study, I could make out the virtues of sanitation when I spotted them thanks to and Mr 'Simple' Sammy with his rich sense of humour who served as my 'sanitation' yardstick.

As a mission teacher in a village primary school things were very hard but Mr Anyang 'Simple' Sammy always made sure he was a shining example for his pupils to emulate even when they are poor.

Although I did not follow my mentor's profession, today I strive to put forward an appreciable appearance always at the workplace.

Israel Ambe Ayongwa, Bamenda, Cameroon

Mr Abu Bakar Kamara

Mr Kamara loves his job and he was my teacher in Primary 6 at the Ahmadiyya Muslim Primary School in Lunsar, Sierra Leone.

He was very punctual in school and participated in all school activities. Mr. Kamara was best at teaching singing and Music. He possessed several good qualities such as patience, love, endurance, and faith in his pupils. He sings best in the whole school and so pupils liked him most.

 I later learnt that music is the food of love
 

He told us that songs dispell saddness, frustration, problems and crisis. I later learned that music is the food of love.

I was his class prefect and as such he knew me very well and when I met him in 2003, we hugged each other as if we were colleagues.

Mr Kamar taught me
Love for my profession - I bee a teacher for ten years
to be a pupil-oriented teacher, to love my students and care for them.
Motivate my students
Patience and faith in people.

Mr Kamara has all these qualities and he still teaches in my primary school and sings well.

Paul Bala Samura in Freetown, Sierra Leone

Miss Chichindu

After greeting the class, "Bonjour mes enfants" to which we would chorus "Bonjour Mademoiselle", she would open a battery-powered turntable and start playing the record of the chapter we were to study for that day. She would replay the lesson several times for one hour.

The exercise would continue for two or three lecture periods before she would switch off, read from the text book and ask each student to read. Then she'd tell us the meaning of what we have read.

Initially, some of us thought the record playing session was repetitive and time-consuming but later we realised it was meant to teach us the correct pronounciation for the French words.

Miss Chichindu would ask, "Tu comprends?"[Do you understand?] and we would say, "Je ne comprend pas" [I don't understand].

That would make her sad and she would look like she might cry which would make us sad that we had not encouraged her, so we would decide immediately to improve for the next class.

 She'd appeal to us to work harder, insisting that French was not a difficult language. And she was right
 

Miss Chichindu did not give up. She'd appeal to us to work harder, insisting that French was not a difficult language. And she was right.

Miss Chichindu's impact on me was so impressive that when I offered basic French in my first year as a Mass Communucation student in the University of Lagos, I scored A when other students were complaining that French was difficult and they were not interested.

Ikomi Jereoma Misan, Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria

Mr A E Jamiru

Where I grew up the vogue was cocoa money and not education. 'You must go to school' was always the shout of teacher A.E. Jamiru at me and my parents.

My father so loved me that he would not want to part with my company for even an hour. This brought him in open confrontation with Teacher Jamiru but Teacher Jamiru never relented, he would drag me by my ears to school.

He would also pay special attention to me. One thing he planted in me was the spirit of boldness. He did this by giving me roles to in the school plays.

Teacher Jamiru not only focused on my schooling but also nutured and trained me to respect people, especially elders.

He's quite an old man now, but he always reminds me that it's good to be brought up in the right manner and encourages me to keep focused and upright.

Teacher Jamiru's direction has made me what I am today, a broadcast journalist.

Mustapha Braima, Pendembu, Sierra Leone

Mr Kirungi Kisarare

My favourite teacher was Mr Kirungi Kisarare. This was in 1992-95, in Ndeeba Secondary School during my O levels. Basically, he made me like the English language. I understood him and we became friends and therefore my perfomance was good.

Elly Katumba Mawule, Kampala, Uganda

Mr Lisutsa

Mr Lisutsa, my maths teacher made me obtain the highest results in mathematics. Now I am an accountant. Glory be to God, thanks to Mr Lisutsa and Hurray to BBC.

Bernard Lubuga, Eldoret, Kenya

Mr George Swahkollie

Who said you can never excel in life? Will you live by what he or she told you? I was told that Algebra was definitely not my subject and that passing this class would be hard.

 My math teacher led me out of my Egypt and brought me to the Promised Land
 

Then in my 8th grade year I met Mr George Swahkollie, my math teacher who lead me out of my Egypt and brought me to the Promised Land.

Today in college I'm rank number one in my calculus math class here in the US.

I want to thank Mr Swahkollie for having such great impact on my life! Mr George Swahkollie where ever you are, I wanna let you know that you are my favorite teacher in Africa!

David Kollie, Somerset, USA (Liberia)

Mr Keifala Amadu Koroma

There are a host of teachers who had influence in my life, but the one who had the greatest impact in my life was the teacher who taught me History and Government in the run up to my O and A level exams at Christ the King College in Bo in Sierra Leone.

His name is Mr. Keifala Amadu Koroma, but prefers to be called "Kello". He was quite an eloquent and devoted teacher who knew the subject to his finger tips.

He was quite an inspiration to me. He actually helped shaped my orientation about world history and politics and helped me understand how various governments operate in the world.

'Kello' was indeed the teacher who influenced me greatly.

Joseph P Abu, Freetown, Sierra Leone

Mr Christian Kodjo Dumatonu

Without a shadow of doubt my favourite teacher was my English master, a Ghanaian, white-bearded man whose name was Christian Kodjo Dumatonu.

He had a profound influence on my life and, believe it or not, I studied hard for my O levels, not because he told me to, but because I was afraid I might let him down.

After I became a journalist, I went back to my Alma Mater, the college of Saint Joseph in Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria to look for and thank the man who had given me the basic skills required to be the best journalist that I could be; but alas! He had returned to Ghana.

I will never forget what he said when I asked him why, as great as his English was, he never considered a career in journalism?

Did you know?
Ghana has only a quarter of the teachers it needs and Lesotho only a fifth
Lewin and Steward 2003

With a glint of satisfaction in his eye he said that he derived great pleasure from imparting knowledge, a satisfaction that according to him money, fame and recognition could never give him.

Stars like Mr Christian Kodjo Dumatonu pass through a man's life only once but leave a lasting impact.

Chima Nwankwo, Vision FM, Abuja

Ms Rose Nsanzabaganwa

I will not forget my French teacher, Rose Nsanzabaganwa, in Year One of my secondary school (Groupe Scolaire Officiel Butare-Rwanda), she taught me my base French, I am always grateful to her.

Through her I pay tribute to all my teachers who made me who I am today; not forgetting Clubanglais of BBC with whom I learned English, I am proud to be multilingual.

Arnaud Emmanuel Ntirenganya, a Rwandan in Yaounde, Cameroon

 
 
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