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BBC English

Words, Words, Words

This week's topic: Prince Ranariddh returns to Cambodia

2nd April 1998

In this section we take a look at some of the language used in a recent news report. This week the programme Current Affairs English discussed Prince Ranariddh's return to Cambodia after months in exile. He is the first Prime Minister of Cambodia and was warmly welcomed by his loyal FUNCINPEC (National United Front for an Independent Neutral Peaceful and Cooperative Cambodia) supporters. Extracts are from the BBC Correspondent, Simon Ingram.

Extract 1: Simon Ingram

"If there was ever any doubt about the enduring affection that FUNCINPEC loyalists have for their ousted leader, the crowds who waited in the intense heat of a Phnom Penh afternoon for his arrival at party headquarters dispelled it. Several thousand cheering supporters swarmed around Prince Ranariddh as he made his way into the compound, past buildings which were stripped of their contents during the factional fighting which led to his downfall last July."

enduring affection: if something is enduring it lasts a long time. The FUNCINPEC party still feel a great fondness for their leader

ousted: to be forced to leave a job or a place

dispelled: past form of "dispel". If you "dispel" an idea or feeling that someone has you stop them believing it or feeling it

swarmed: a verb, to move together quickly. You can also use the noun "swarm": for example "A swarm of bees"

Extract 2: Simon Ingram

"In a short speech, the prince said his reception demonstrated that FUNCINPEC remained a pillar of the country. He called again for fair elections, saying the Cambodian people should be able to decide their future freely. But while the gathering reflected a level of popular appeal that his rival, second Prime Minister, Hun Sen, would envy, it's with the latter that the clear political advantage lies at present. The discussions with Asian diplomats that kept Prince Ranariddh busy at his hotel headquarters earlier on Tuesday reveals no ready solution to the problems blocking his participation in elections due to be held in late July. "

pillar of the country: if someone is described as a pillar of a particular group then they are an active and important member of it

latter: when you have just mentioned two things you refer to the second as "the latter", you refer to the first as "the former"

blocking: if you block something that is being arranged you prevent it from being done

ready: here, ready is used without the verb "to be" and just like an ordinary adjective. It means something that can be used immediately

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This week's "Current Affairs English" programme is written and produced by Ruth Whitbread.


Words in 1998

Words in 1997

Words in 1996

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