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  Entertainment archives: 2006/72005/6  
Entertainment!
 

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- Gene Wilder

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- The Turner Prize

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- A passion for cricket

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- My Best Friend

Gene Wilder
Gene Wilder
 
Gene Wilder has worked with Mel Brooks on lots of successful comedies, including The Producers, Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein. Although the two are good friends, they almost fell out last year over Mel Brooks's plan to make Young Frankenstein into a stage musical. We hear part of an interview with Gene Wilder, in which he explains what happened between the pair. Plus, we find out what 'The Borscht Belt' is..!

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Vocabulary from the programme

a hit
a film, song or production that is popular and successful
e.g. It was a hit on Broadway
It was a West End hit

hit
an adjective describing a film, song or production that is successful
e.g. It was a hit musical

a flop
a film or production which is commercially unsuccessful
e.g. It was a terrific flop... they didn't let him make another film ever again!

to flop
A verb describing what happens when a film or production fails commercially
e.g. They spent a fortune on promotion, but the movie flopped badly

NOTE: We use 'hit' as a noun and an adjective and 'flop' as a noun and a verb

'Over my dead body'
A strong phrase used when someone really doesn't want something to happen
e.g. When they said they would have to close the shop, I said 'Over my dead body'

Borscht
A soup, usually made with beetroot

The Borscht Belt
The Catskill mountains, where Jewish comics (who drank Borscht) would go to do shows

material
the ideas that go into works of art (here, comics' jokes and routines)
e.g. Are you coming to my show tonight? I've got loads of new material to try out!
She's gathering material for her next novel

NOTE: Use 'material' as an uncountable noun in this context

'to have nothing to lose'
when doing something has no risks you have 'nothing to lose'
e.g. My name wasn't attached to the project so I had nothing to lose
I'd already lost my job, my family, my home... I figured I didn't have anything to lose by taking the man up on his offer


a buck
a dollar
e.g. He gave me twenty bucks



Extras
download scriptProgramme script (pdf - 22 k)
download audioDownload this programme (mp3 - 1.7 mb)

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