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Grammar Challenge
 

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- Practice quiz 1

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- Practice quiz 2

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- Use the grammar
Grammar challenger Sebastian from Colombia

Pronunciation: 'ed' endings
Regular verbs in the simple past all end in 'ed'. These two small letters can be pronounced in three different ways. In the programme we find out what these different pronunciations are and give our challenger Sebastian the chance to produce the correct sounds in our role-play.

Listen

Listen to the programme!


Find out more

There are three different ways to pronounce the 'ed' ending of regular verbs in the simple past tense: / Id / , / t / or / d /.

The pronunciation depends on the sound at the end of the infinitve of the main verb and whether it is voiced or not.

/Id /
infinitives that end in the sounds
/t/ or /d/

/ d /
infinitives that end in a voiced sound

/ t /
infinitves that end in an unvoiced sound

needed
hated
dated
seated

lived
chilled
enjoyed
tried

shopped
picked
wished
crunched


A voiced sound is one that
vibrates in your throat when you say it. For more information and for a technique for finding out whether a sound is voiced or not, download Nuala's description below.

To see a list of voiced and unvoiced sounds, vist our Pronunciation Tips section here.

As well as some consonant sounds, all vowels sounds are voiced.


Download

Download Nuala's grammar explanation and table (pdf - 41 K)

Download this programme (mp3 - 1.8 MB)

Download Nuala's tip for finding voiced sounds (mp3 - 169 K)

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Take the challenge
Now it's your turn to practise ed endings . Go to our quiz page on this subject here.


Meet us Useful links Next episode

Nuala
Nuala and Callum

Pronunciation Tips
Oxford House College*

*The BBC is not responsible for the content of external websites

We go back to the topic of articles and look at some simple rules for using 'a' and 'an', the indefinite articles.

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