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Christmas 2007
 

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- Calendar 2008

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- Advent Calendar

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- 12 Days of Christmas

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- Downloadable Gifts

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- Santa's Sack

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- Pantomime Introduction

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- Pantomime Scene 1

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- Pantomime Scene 2

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- Pantomime Scene 3

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- Pantomime Scene 4

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- Pantomime Scene 5

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- Pantomime Scene 6

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- Pantomime Scene 7

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- Pantomime Scene 8

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- Pantomime Scene 9
Scene 3: Going underground

Scene 3: Going underground

Listen or download Scene 3 of our pantomime by clicking on the links below. As you listen, try to answer these comprehension questions:

  1. Where is Apple?
  2. What is Rat 1's wife called?
  3. Does Apple have a nap at the end?

The answers are at the bottom of this page.



Vocabulary

doormat – ‘I very nearly became a luxury doormat…’
something that people wipe their feet on before they enter a house

the likes of – ‘I … nearly became a …doormat for the likes of Franky Banky’
a group of people similar to the stated person. Apple nearly became a doormat for Franky Banky or someone similar to Franky Banky.

old – ‘… time to use the old night vision’
this isn’t actually something old, but something useful and reliable. Apple might also have said …time to use the good old night vision.

This’ll do – ‘… is there a warm little corner where I can curl up for ten minutes? … This’ll do’
Do here means to be good enough. E.g.:

It’s not perfect but it’ll do.  

You can’t use this in progressive forms. It is usually intransitive and can be followed with a prepositional phrase with for:

This lamp will do for the bedside table.

sarcasm
making statements which are different from your real feelings in order to be funny or make a point, e.g., if B thinks that A never does any housework then he might make the following sarcastic remark:

A: Why don’t you ever wash up?
B: Oh right, because you wash up every day, don’t you?

Encantada – ‘ Rat 4, Rat 4!… Encantada’
Spanish for Delighted to meet you. Apple likes Rat 4.

a strong family likeness – ‘Yes, there is a strong family likeness’
A visual similarity amongst family members

to tell something / someone apart – ‘it’s easy to tell us apart
to be able to identify a person or object from someone or something very similar. This can also be used in the plural, e.g.:

The twins are so similar, only their mother can tell them apart.

to boo – ‘…you can all boo if you like’
to make a noise like this: Boooooo! This noise is called a boo. At pantomimes, audiences usually boo the villain.

In English, we also say Boo! when we want to surprise someone, but this is not to boo or a boo.

It’s gone [a certain time] - ‘It’s gone two o’clock !’
informal expression meaning that it’s later than this time. We often use it when we are late or delayed.

Answers
  1. In a sewer. At the start he says, ' Oh, I’m in a sewer, how delightful.'
  2. Rat 2
  3. No - he wants a nap, but Franky Banky takes him away. Oh no!
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