This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.
Search BBC
BBC World Service
BBC BBC News BBC Sport BBC Weather BBC World Service Worldservice languages
spacer gif
You are in: Home page > News English > Words in the News
Learning English
spacer gif
Words in the News
Wednesday 08 May 2002
Vocabulary from the news. Listen to and read the report then find explanations of difficult words below.

  Pim Fortuyn
European immigration
Summary: The recent rise in popularity of some right wing European politicians like the recently murdered Pim Fortuyn in the Netherlands or Jean Marie Le Pen in France, has put the issue of immigration firmly centre stage. This report from Rachel Harvey:
   
The News Listen  
  Pim Fortuyn sometimes tried to dissociate himself from other far right European politicians by saying that unlike many he didn't advocate sending immigrants home, he simply wanted to prevent new arrivals; "Holland is full" became one of his catch-phrases.

His views, and those of many of his counterparts in other European countries, may be unpalatable to the liberal political mainstream, but they clearly struck a chord among a portion of the population which is increasingly unsettled by the growing number of immigrants to Europe.

Around ten percent of the population of the Netherlands is defined as being of non-Western origin. Italy has an estimated 1.5 million immigrants mostly from Morrocco, Albania and Romania. The number of foreign born nationals in Germany has been put as high as 7 million.

After a period of gentle decline during the 1990s, net migration to Europe is on the rise again and governments are struggling to work out policies to address the issue. Many are now concentrating on schemes to try to integrate new arrivals better, through language classes and cultural awareness programmes. But the positive benefits of such schemes take time to filter through and, in the meantime, politicians with anti-immigrant views are gaining ground.

Rachel Harvey, BBC.

 

   
The Words Listen
 
  dissociate
if you dissociate yourself from someone or something, you try to deny or end any connection with them

 
   
  advocate
to publicly support something

 
   
  counterparts
the counterpart of a person or thing is another person or thing that has a similar fuction or position in a different place

 
   
  unpalatable
unpleasant

 
   
  struck a chord
if something strikes a chord with you, it makes you feel sympathy or enthusiasm

 
   
  on the rise
increasing

 
   
  integrate
mix

 
   
  to filter through
to gradually take effect

 
   
  Read more about this story  
 

Other Words in the News archives

 

BBC copyright
 
Learning English | News English | Business English | Watch and Listen
 
Grammar and Vocabulary | Communicate | Quizzes | For teachers
 
Downloads | FAQ | Contact us