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Last updated at 17:31 GMT, Monday, 28 February 2011

King's Speech crowned at Oscars

Summary

28 February 2011

The King's Speech won the best picture award at the Oscars. The film about King George VI's battle to overcome a speech difficulty won a total of four Academy Awards, including best actor for Colin Firth.

Reporter:
Peter Bowes

Colin Firth with his Oscar statuette, and his wife Livia Giuggioli

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Report

The words every filmmaker wants to hear:

Spielberg: And the Oscar goes to…

Bowes: came from the legendary Hollywood director, Steven Spielberg.

Spielberg: The King's Speech…

Bowes: The film tells the story of how George VI employed an unconventional speech therapist from Australia to help him overcome his problem with stammering. Funded in part by the UK Film Council, a body which is being disbanded by the government, the film also won the award for best original screenplay and best director. Colin Firth, who plays the King, joked that his award for best actor meant his career had peaked.

Firth: I'm afraid I have to warn you, that I am experiencing stirrings, somewhere in the upper abdominals, which are threatening to form themselves into dance moves.

Bowes: David Seidler, who wrote the screenplay, said he hoped the award would inspire people who are trying to overcome speech impediments:

Seidler: I accept this on behalf of all the stutterers throughout the world. We have a voice. We have been heard, thanks to you, the Academy.

Bowes: It wasn't a clean sweep for The King's Speech, out of 12 nominations it won in four categories, but Oscar glory is bound to boost the film's takings at the box office.

Peter Bowes, BBC News

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Vocabulary

unconventional

here, alternative, quirky or not following well-known or established methods

funded

financed or given money to be made

disbanded

taken apart or discontinued

peaked

reached the top, or become as good as it's likely to get

stirrings

strong feelings that make you want to act in a particular way

upper abdominals

muscles around your belly or stomach

to form themselves into

to come together and become

speech impediments

medical conditions causing people to suffer difficulties with speaking

a clean sweep

here, winning every award it was nominated for

takings

money earned from selling (tickets)

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