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Wednesday, 05 August 2009

Teacher makes mistake! Official!

It sounds impossible but it's true! The lines from 'That's Entertainment' describing a Shakespeare play should have read:

Where a ghost and a prince meet
And everyone ends in mincemeat.

The ghost was in fact a king but that's little help. Amazing then that Mohammed somehow got the right answer - well done to him!

The name of the play is contained in his comment on my last post. You can have another guess before checking.

Now I guess you want to make mincemeat of me! Especially after the terrible joke I'm going to leave you with:

Q: What do you call a deer with no eyes?
A: No idea

You have to say it aloud to get the pun in the punchline (No-eye deer)

pun - word play
punchline - the line that gets a laugh in a joke

Comments

Wow! My response was correct. I am over the moon Kieran. You should give me a pat on my back. With regard to 'No-eye deer', it might refer to something different from the obvious meaning as I think. I reckon it has a hidden meaning rather than the apparent one. 'No-eye deer' may refer to 'No I dear'. It is just an attempt rather than saying nothing. I am looking forward to hearing from you Kieran. by for now, Mohammed

Kieran,you set a tough question. Q:Does he has a legs?

Hi Kieran! We´d never want to make mincemeat of you. Besides, who´d take over the blogs if we made such a thing ;-)? Anyway, I´ve just remembered of a former English teacher I had, who used to tell us jokes in order to helps us to take new vocabulary in. The jokes aren´t so funny but the my teacher told them were great. See ya tomorrow, Ana Paula.

Hi Kieran! We´d never want to make mincemeat of you. Besides, who´d take over the blogs if we made such a thing ;-)? Anyway, I´ve just remembered of a former English teacher I had, who used to tell us jokes in order to helps us to take new vocabulary in. The jokes aren´t so funny but the my teacher told them were great. See ya tomorrow, Ana Paula.

Hello Kieran! Welcome on the board. I hope you will enjoy your time as a teacher with us all. I like your riddle questions which you us at the end of your post. Here's my question to you. What do you call and angle which is cute? I will answer to this question but not before you :-). Best wishes, Naheed

Hello Kieran! Welcome on the board. I hope you will enjoy your time as a teacher with us all. I like your riddle questions which you us at the end of your post. Here's my question to you. What do you call and angle which is cute? I will answer to this question but not before you :-). Best wishes, Naheed

Hi Kieran, during my graduation years, Shakespeare's play "Julius Ceasar" found place in English subject curriculam. This poetic novel was really a ghost for me. One dialogue still echos in my mind -Brutus to his wife " O God! render me worthy of this noble lady" What a feeling of respect for his wife. Novel depicts the nature of rulers, Flattery, unlogical behaviour of common masses and much more.

My joke follows on from your joke: Q: What do you call a deer with no eyes and no legs A: Still no idea

Hi Kieran, How are you and how is the weather like in Bristol? It seems to have a short break after incessant raining in my town. I don't want to make mincemeat of you because I was taught teachers are always right although you came clean about your unforgivable mistake. But I think you're still right.-horrible education's power(jesting). This is not a grudge but I do hope this joke will smite you. Here goes... There are two goldfish in a tank. After a while one says to the other,” you got any idea how to drive this things?' I must own up which the joke is from Stephen Keeler who was admired by so many readers/blogwatchers in December and January in 2006-2007.If you don’t mind, I’d love to wish him always to be healthy and happy. Have a victory day ,Kieran!

Hi Kieran, How are you and how is the weather like in Bristol? It seems to have a short break after incessant raining in my town. I don't want to make mincemeat of you because I was taught teachers are always right although you came clean about your unforgivable mistake. But I think you're still right.-horrible education's power(jesting). This is not a grudge but I do hope this joke will smite you. Here goes... There are two goldfish in a tank. After a while one says to the other,” you got any idea how to drive this things?' I must own up which the joke is from Stephen Keeler who was admired by so many readers/blogwatchers in December and January in 2006-2007.If you don’t mind I’d love to wish him always to be healthy and happy. Have a victory day ,Kieran!

I have to add Q:What do you call a dead deer with no eyes? A:Stil no idea.

Dear Mr. McGovern, I really appreciate English humour for its linguistic bias. While your riddle about the one-eyed deer exploits the homophonic identity of English word-combinations, here's another question which capitalizes on the polysemy of words: WHY IS THE LETTER "E" LIKE LONDON? The answer: "Because "E" is the capital of England". Linguistic humour is practically untranslatable.

Hello!And zilions of wellcomes KIERAN. Can you please tell me what is the difference between punchline and pinchline if there is any . Thank you and i am looking forward to following your chalenging blog.

Dear Kieran, Mistakes do happen. But don't you worry, I believe all the readers have more than forgiven you by now. There is an uposide ,though. This little episode showed us that you are really an open and honest sort of person who doesn't mind owning up a few slips. The humour of your joke is a bit lost on me. The jokes that do the rounds in our part of the world are rather different. We are so conditioned by them that usually we don't find the wordplays much fun.

Answering Cheikh Vall from Mauritania about the difference between “PUNCH LINE” and “PINCH LINE”: A punch line is the last line of a joke or funny story that gives it its point. A pinch line (in non-terminological usage) is a line which is “pinched” with fingers – like a horizontal line on a continuous strip of paper which is contained in a ticket-dispensing machine. You usually tear your ticket off along this line after paying for the ticket. The term “pinch line” has different meanings depending on the sphere of technology. For instance, with space debris in the Earth’s orbit all members of a uniformly released fragmentation cloud will (though at different times) revisit their point of origin, which is called the “pinch point”. They will also pass through a common line which is denoted as the “pinch line”. Hopefully, it helps.

Thanks for all your contributions. This blog has now closed and can no longer accept new comments.

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