Institutional

Last updated: 23 october, 2009 - 10:22 GMT

Solitary confinement

Iraq's oil minister Hussain Al-Shahristani was imprisoned in Abu Ghraib prison under Saddam Hussein.

This nuclear scientist spoke to The Interview in February 2008, where he told presenter Owen Bennett-Jones how he suffered torture and a decade in solitary confinement.

You don't hear anything, you don't see anybody, you are just there by yourself

Hussain Al-Shahristani

Listen to more of The Interview with Hussain Al-Shahristani, where he talks about having to tackle the repeated sabotage of the country's oil pipelines and wrestling with a law to cover the oil industry which satisfied Shias, Sunnis and Kurds.

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His interview inspired Swiss filmmaker, Mato Atom to help create a new television campaign for BBC World Service. Watch the promotion below.

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He found the idea of solitary confinement special and intriguing and wanted to visualise the experience with the idea of floating elements representing freedom and a black cube that embodied isolation.

The floating elements personify family and friends that tried to reach him but were repelled by his confinement

He wanted the narration to be minimal, abstract and harsh - to try and portray the emotion felt by his family.

In the video below, he talks about how his inspiration came mainly from non-artistic disciplines like philosophy and science.

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