Last updated: 10 september, 2009 - 11:50 GMT

Migration flows slow as recession bites

two migrant workers sleep on chairs near a construction site in Beijing

Two migrant workers sleep on chairs near a construction site in Beijing

Global recession has made many people worse off, but among the hardest hit have been the migrant workers who leave home and often travel thousands of miles to make a living.

A study commissioned by the BBC for our Aftershock season has found that the downturn has caused a steep decline in migration, and that many migrant workers are returning to their home countries, despite higher unemployment and a lack of jobs.

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The BBC's Aftershock migration study was carried out by the Washington-based Migration Policy Institute.

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In North America, immigration from Mexico into the United States has fallen to almost as quarter of what it was four years ago. However the stream of workers to the US still has a large impact on Mexican society.

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First broadcast on World Business News

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