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A member of the San people
"So far the evidence that we have in the world points to Africa as the Cradle of Humankind." 
George Abungu, Director-General of the National Museums of Kenya.

Most of the available scientific evidence suggests Africa was the continent in which human life began.

We can however never be absolutely sure. There is always the possibility of fossil discoveries being made in another part of the world, which could make us believe otherwise.

Listen HereListen to Thabo Mbeki, President of South Africa, on the contribution of the continent towards the development of humanity

San people taking a break from huntingIt is in Africa that the oldest fossils of the early ancestors of humankind have been found, and it is the only continent that shows evidence of humans through the key stages of evolution.

Scientific techniques, ranging from fossil identification, radiocarbon dating and analysis of DNA - the human genetic blueprint passed down from one generation to the next - all support the notion that Africa, and in particular the eastern and southern regions, is the cradle of humankind.

Listen HereListen to Origins Of Humankind, the first programme in the BBC landmark radio series The Story of Africa, presented by Hugh Quarshie