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THIS STORY LAST UPDATED: 10 March 2004 1415 GMT
Noble is wafflely versatile
Ross Noble

Geordie comedian Ross Noble brought his 'Sonic Waffle' tour to Swindon.

Amongst topics for discussion were Super Mario, and Dairylea.

Wilf Guyatt laughed along.

WEB LINKS

Official Ross Noble 'Sonic Waffle' site

Ross Noble's listing on www.chortle.co.uk


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external websites.

FACTS

Ross Noble was the winner of the Manchester Evening News theatre award for best comedy, and the New Zealand Comedy Guild award for best international comic in 2002.

He is due to record a second series of 'Ross Noble Goes Global' his travelogue show for Radio 4.

The 'Sonic Waffle' tour has 45 dates, including a three night stint in Paris and a night at Salisbury City Hall in March
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If the mark of a good comedian is being able to think on their feet then Ross Noble could possibly be on this country's hottest talents.

The ambling walk and shoulder length jet-black curly hair hides a doubtlessly intelligent and quick witted thinker, who chooses not always to show it. Ross Noble much prefers to talk about Jimmy Saville and Super Mario instead until someone challenges him.

His popular appearances on 'Have I Got News for You' have introduced the 26-year-old Geordie comedian and his surreal humour to a wider audience. On the occasions he has been on the show, Noble has managed to outperform series staple Paul Merton.

Any doubts about his ability were dispelled before he was even able to launch into his own material. Noble walked on to the stage following an amusing introductory video. Before he could utter a word a heckler shouted out the word 'tortoise'.

He took the seemingly bizarre heckle in his stride and managed to base a large percentage of his first act around a random word. The reptilian observations flowed thick and fast throughout the evening.

Throughout the rest of his show Noble worked 'off the cuff', indicating how one of his greatest strengths is his reliance on hecklers to generate the many digressions that pepper his material.

His thoughts and the comments from hecklers were weaved into his own material. One such example was the merit of using Dairylea triangles in Chinese cuisine, which was bookended between his own tale about watching Britney Spear's videos with the volume down and proved to be far funnier.

As with comedy contemporary Peter Kay, Ross Noble is totally emerged in pop-culture - a self confessed fan of science fiction and low budget kung-fu flicks, with an unhealthy Chas & Dave obsession.

The laughs were fast and furious throughout the evening and it was clear that Noble appreciated the involvement of the audience.

If you like slightly surreal 'off the wall' humour, an evening with Ross Noble is thoroughly recommended. The 'Sonic Waffle' tour comes to Salisbury City Hall on March 10th, 2003.

Wilf Guyatt

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