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Faith

You are in: Wear > Faith > Ruqaya's Ramadan diary - Part 3

Ruqaya (right) and her friend celebrate Eid

Ruqaya (right) and her friend celebrate

Ruqaya's Ramadan diary - Part 3

Durham University student Ruqaya Izzidien is sharing her thoughts about observing Ramadan, Islam's holy month of fasting. In the final instalment of her diary, Ruqaya tells us how she celebrated Eid and what Ramadan means to her.

Ramadan is over, Eid has been celebrated, and as I sit here writing this, I am recovering from a massive bump to the head.

Last night, I managed to run full speed into a doorframe and now I have the most stupendous lump on my forehead that makes me look like a distant relative of a Klingon. But it suddenly struck me (excuse the pun) how ironic my bump to the head was.

"Sometimes I focus so hard on Islam, trying to run towards it, that I forget that I have to dodge obstructions to get there."

You see, I was running with a purpose. I had an aim and I was so focused upon my target that I forgot that things can get in the way. This just feels like an apt analogy for my relationship with Islam.

Sometimes I focus so hard on Islam, trying to run towards it, that I forget that I have to dodge obstructions to get there. But you see, although I may have been thrown off course momentarily, I got up and walked on, with more care, learning from my mistakes.

I spent Eid with some friends in Newcastle and I had an amazing time. Yeah, we put up balloons and decorations and made some nice foods for the party, but I just loved the atmosphere.

I’d forgotten that the spirit of Eid is so overwhelming. It just feels awesome to think that around the world, so many of my brothers and sisters are celebrating this day. Everyone is in a better mood, and it just gives me a bit more hope in those times when I feel like the world is on its way down a steep hill.

Togetherness

The point I’m trying to communicate is that despite the fact that I might be thousands of miles away from someone; during Eid, and even Ramadan, I feel a bit closer to them.

This time of year reminds me of how similar I am to the Palestinians and Iraqis… I could easily have been born into one of those countries.

When I think about it, I’m surprised I wasn’t. I am, after all just as Iraqi as I am English. I suppose in a nutshell, what I want to say is this:

Ramadan in Iraq: She devotes herself reading the Quran.
Ramadan in Palestine: She closes her eyes and just listens to the Quran.
Ramadan in Durham: I try to live and breathe the Quran.

Ramadan just helps me to keep my feet anchored in the ground, and even if sometimes I do get knocked slightly backwards, nobody can change the fact that I am who I am - a butterfly.

(Orginially published in November 2005.)

last updated: 01/09/2008 at 10:47
created: 07/11/2005

You are in: Wear > Faith > Ruqaya's Ramadan diary - Part 3

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