Kate Arnold, sprinter

Kate Arnold

The British sprinter and former swimmer discusses the importance of setting goals and her hopes for the future.

Raise Your Game: How does it feel to achieve a personal best?

Kate Arnold: It feels great. It makes you feel good.

RYG: Athletics events are largely individual, but how important is it to have team support?

KA: It's great to have a team behind you. It keeps you going and it keeps you motivated.

RYG: What do you say to yourself to stay motivated when you're training and competing?

KA: Don't worry if you do something wrong, just keep going and try to look at the good points.

RYG: How important is it to set yourself goals?

Profile

Name:
Kate Arnold

Born:
4 September 1988

From:
Newport

Event:
100m and 200m

Achievements:
Sixth - IWAS World Wheelchair and Amputee Games 100m and 200m, Teipei (2007)

KA: It's really important. You need to focus, and make sure you get it right when you need to.

RYG: What are your future goals?

KA: I'm aiming for London 2012. That's definitely one of my major goals.

RYG: What sort of preparation will you need to do to get to London 2012?

KA: You need to make sure you're doing the right training, and that you get as much experience in competitions as possible.

RYG: How do you manage your time effectively?

KA: It was difficult when I was in college. It was hard to get enough rest, but I've finished college now, so I've just got to worry about my training.

RYG: How do you ensure that you keep improving?

KA: It's just practice. You practise all the parts of your race to make sure that they're all tip top.

RYG: What has sport given you?

KA: A lot of the rewards are quite personal. When I've trained and I finally get a personal best it's a great feeling.

It's also given me great friends. I've travelled all over the world too. I wouldn't have seen those places if it wasn't for sport.

RYG: What advice would you give to young people looking to get involved in sport?

KA: Get into something you really enjoy. It's great to be social too.


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