Joe Thomas

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The Welsh 800 metre athlete believes discipline comes with practice.

Raise Your Game: How do you prepare for a big race?

Joe Thomas: The training is the most important thing and getting in peak performance. Being organised is also important, making sure you've got everything with you, like your spikes.

RYG: Does discipline come easy to you?

JT: I think the more you practise the more you get used to it. We practise race conditions in training so that makes it a bit easier when it comes to the big races.

RYG: How do you manage your time?

JT: It's just time management, fitting your time in for training and university, and having a bit of fun as well.

RYG: Is education important?

JT: Definitely. It's something to fall back on. You could get an injury and you need a back up plan.

RYG: How do you deal with pressure?

Profile

Name:
Joe Thomas

Born:
29 January 1988

Event:
800 metres

From:
Pontypridd

Achievements:

  • Bronze - 800m - Aviva British Grand Prix, Gateshead (2009)
  • Winner - 800m - Aviva National Championships/Olympic Game Selection (2008)
  • Winner - England Athletics Under 23s (2008)
  • Winner - Welsh Senior Indoor Championships (2008)

JT: There's a lot of pressure out there, there are a lot of people watching. The more I get used to it, the easier I'll be able to perform. You just switch off and concentrate on yourself, that's the main thing. You can use a crowd to boost you along.

RYG: How do you motivate yourself before races?

JT: I think it comes naturally, especially once you get to a certain level, and as you get older.

RYG: What music psyches you up in training and before a race?

JT: I'm quite into indie rock and some heavier stuff as well. I've got a broad range. Brand New, Alexisonfire, Her Words Kill.

RYG: What advice would you give to young people wanting to get into sport?

JT: Take it slowly, don't rush into it straight away, let everything fall into place.


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