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Colours

By Eve Green
October 2005, Wales
A digital story from Capture Wales

Questions about Colour

Eve answers some important questions about colour from her six year old son.

"At school in the '50s and '60s, I was bullied, because the other children thought I was a funny colour, and different from them. We all wondered why my Mum was white, and I was brown.

Years later, my six-year-old son came home from school, and asked me: 'Why are you brown, Mummy? You're supposed to be white like me and Daddy.'
'Get your paints out darling, and I'll show you how to make colours.'
'What colour is God then?'
'I don't know, love. Maybe God's like a power-ranger and changes colour all the time.'
'Has God got any kids? Is Jesus his boy?'
'Yes love, we're all God's children.'
'Are Muslims God's children?'
'Yes darling.'
'You're a Muslim, you're brown, brown people are Muslims, white people are Christians.'
'No darling, someone's colour doesn't tell you if they're a Muslim or Christian.' 'Mummy, what colour was your Mum and Dad?'
'My Mum was white and my Dad was black. He was from Africa.'
'Are they dead? Were they shot? Will I die? Mummy, Mummy, are you listening to me?'
'Yes love, why don't you go out and play now?'"

Eve Green

Please tell us about yourself.
I'm a Yorkshire woman with an east London accent and am now a resident of Wales. I'm passionate about creative writing and communication between people.

What's your story about?
The impressions and assumptions of young children expressed in a barrage of innocent questions. It explains how children make simplistic links between colour and religion, and perhaps makes us think about where these ideas come from.

Why did you choose to tell this particular story?
It represents the curiosity of impressionable children. Living in an area where there is little diversity can limit exposure to colour variations in a family. I attempt to address my son's questions and those of his friends.

What did you find the most rewarding about the workshop?
The team were positive regarding the exploration process right through to film completion. I have enjoyed working alongside other participants and in some cases made new friends. This workshop has introduced me to new media of expression and I will go on to learn more.

Your comments

"I loved your story, especially the part when mummy shifts from answering questions to suggesting it's time for her son to grind clay. Mum's simple answer was illuminating and timing is everything." Mo Morris, Berkeley, CA, USA.

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