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13 July 2014
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Wild galleries

You are in: Suffolk > Nature > Wild galleries > Gallery: The Otter Trust

Gallery: The Otter Trust

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Mark
Just so were clear on this...I like Otters there great animals ok but..There is no help at all in protecting our fisherys that have been wiped out by Otters.Great job well done the otters are back fine now how about addressing the issue of how we find 11grand for a fence we have lost 15 thousand pounds worth of fish and the best we get for an answer is to stop it is put a fence up.If you had considered more carefully the impact otters would have on our fisherys we would not be in the mess we are now.Im not going to get into the stupid agrument of anglers hate otters we dont what we hate is the fact that they have been released with no control and are now a very serious problem.Cute or not they kill thousands of pound worth of fish stocks and will continue to do so. Try telling a fishery that has lost all its fish that its ok because otters are cute.Cute has nothing to do with it they need to be controlled like any other animal.I love my dog but I know when to put it on a lead.

Mark
Tim your missing the point! To release a major predator back with no constraint and no help for those that have to suffer fish stock losses is not on.In other words if your going to send an otter into our fisherys and give it full protection to wipe us out of fish dont you think you should coff up for the funding for a fence instead of telling us oh there killing your fish sorry about that why dont you spend 11 grand on a fence to keep them out.Otters with no control imposed on them are bad news and why should we coff up 11 grand when we did not create this problem in the first place?

Dave
I saw our fishery lose about 40,000 of specimen carp. Tim - the otters didn't eat them - they killed them and left them after a bite or two. They bit off their fins so they couldn't swim and left them to die. "Confining fish in an unnatural way" ????????? Are you seriously trying to argue that it is unnatural for fish to live in a lake?Anglers are not anti otter but they are anti losing thousands of pounds worth of specimen fish.

Robert
Mark:Aye, cute. The fisherman, indeed, seems a worthy creature, but think of the damage he does to otters! In all seriousness, the danger to a fish from a human is many times greater than from an otter.----------->Otter HumanSpecies killed 0 |Lots

heather
I adore otters ever since I went to sea life and I think they are sooooo cute,I am aged 9 and I would love to have a pet otter!Otters are my favorite animal!

Sue Willis
Super pictures of these comical and clever animals. Keep up the good work at the Trust.

Tim
The Otter Trust is now closed to non-members, following the success of the programme of reintroduction. The Tamar centre has been sold.Mark - otters don't 'slaughter' fish, they eat them, just like you do. If humans choose to confine fish in an unnatural way that makes them unable to escape their natural predators, nobody should be surprised when they're eaten by those natural predators. It's hard to argue 'ownership' of living animals if you're going to get precious about it.

Mark Casto
Very cute but are you aware of the damage that otters do to fisherys I can show you some pictures I have taken of specimen fish slaughtered by otters they will not be coming back.ITs time the public saw the other side of otters and otter predation is a serious problem for fishery owners.yes there cute but not if your specimen tench or carp with no protection.

james
great pictures!

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