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13 November 2014

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You are in: Stoke & Staffordshire > Entertainment > Music > The Jazz Show > The Jazzbeat Messageboard - Archive

The Jazzbeat Messageboard - Archive

When Chris Gumbley was running the BBC Stoke jazz show (2007-2009), you had plenty to say about his choices! Look back & remember

To return to our Jazz section, and for details of our current jazz show, click on 'The Jazz Show' link at the top right of this webpage.

last updated: 16/09/2009 at 14:46
created: 15/03/2006

Have Your Say

Thanks for all your comments. This board is now closed.

James Reeves
Thanks for two years of great listening Chris. We shall miss the programme. Good luck with your future projects.Best wishesJames Reeves

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris/John - re Whiteman's Tain't So - the bassoon was nothing to do with Garvin Bushell. There were in fact 3 bassoons played by Frank Trumbauer, Rube Crozier and Roy Mayer. Roy Bargy, the pianist on the session , recalled that this haunting little opus caused quite a lot of bother. It was only by Take 9 that they achieved an issuable version. Bix kept fluffing his solos and and arranger Bill Challis had to blow a pitch pipe so that Bing Crosby could make his entry in the correct key (this info courtesey of Philip and Linda Evans' The Leon Bix Beiderbecke Story). Still the end result fully justified the effort ! - best wishes- Mike

Mike from Bradford, West Yorks
Sorry to hear your last show is 9 Sept. I have enjoyed the wide range of jazz you select, and your sharing an impressive knowledge of the music. Best wishes, Mike

Al Tyson
Don't fire Chris! His choice of music and his commentary are as good as it gets-equal to the likes of anything I've heard. He is the best you ever had, you're making a big mistake!

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - brief self correction - if I'd bothered to check I would have realised that the Dutch Jazz Orchestra track on last week's programme was indeed from their Gil Evans/Gerry Mulligan album. I missed hearing this item on the show - that's my excuse anyway...- best wishes - Mike

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - first of all sorry to hear that you're leaving Jazz Beat - reading between the lines I can only assume that it became too difficult to slot in with other commitments ??! You were stepping into a big pair of shoes but I think you've stamped your own personality on to the show and made some interesting innovations such as the themed specials. So thanks for keeping the (blue ?) flame burning.
As a longtime listener to John Hellings Saturday Big Bands I know you'll be handing Jazz Beat into a safe pair of hands.

RE Fred's comments below. The Dutch Jazz Orchestra recorded 4 CDs worth of previously unheard Strayhorn arrangements/compositions during the mid - late '90s.The others are Something To Live For, You Go To My Head(arrangements of standards)and So This Is Love. They were available very cheaply via a well known discount supplier in Dorset - when I last checked 2 were sold out but the other 2 were down to around a couple of quid or so. Well worth investigating. Among other things the Orchestra has also done CDs of Mary Lou Williams and Gil Evans compositions/ arrangements. Much more than just an acedemic exercise - beautifully played and recorded, liberally peppered with excellent solos by musicians whose names the late , lamented Humph would have loved to mispronounce !By the way one of these lesser known compositions - On The Wrong Side Of The Railroad Tracks - was recorded (duly 'fonkified') by the 'good doctor' on his'99 Duke Elegant album. It was still in Dr John's repertoire when I saw him in Buxton last October - but I wonder how many audience mebers realised where this song originated ?
One last request suggestion - perhaps you could give your listeners an aural treat with something by the late Neil Ardley ? If you could find A Symphony Of Aramanths from the BBC Library that would be great. Otherwise anything from Kaleidoscope Of Rainbows, Harmony Of The Spheres or the New Jazz Orchestra.
All the very best and thanks again for 2 years of stimulating listening - best wishes - Mike

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,I am back again with some more trivia on this weeks show. Annette Hanshaw gave up singing in her twenties to concentrate, I think, on being a wife and mother - anyway she gave up early.Hawk - I have not heard "When day is done" for many, many years but having the 78 in the garage I know every wonderful note. As you said what a wonderful melodic style and ease of playing he had.Getz - Ronnie also said that his band used to make up tunes that Stan could play, such as "There will never be another Getz", "The Getz I love" or "I'm in love with a wonderful Getz" etc.Billie - I think that "Lady in satin" with the worn out voice but the wonderful singing is a terrific album. You could say that it is awfully wonderful.Melissa Morgan I loved.New Note, or what was, used to get a lot of trade from me when I was enjoying my early (jazz shop) retirement.The Dutch Jazz Orchestra CD was reviewed in Jazz Journal in August. The last paragraph said "In a just world the tracks on this CD would receive many radio plays. In today's world who knows?" At least it has had one play. I have a fine earlier CD (1995) called "Portrait of a silk thread" of undiscovered Strayhorn tunes. The sleeve notes say "On average Billy Strayhorn wrote at least one piece a week during all the thirty years he worked for Duke. This was more than the orchestra could handle especially since Duke himself composed incessantly" And so on. It has some beautiful things on it and you would like it.Lots of new names for me this week - I did not know anybody on Transitions.Tierney Sutton I have in my collection (or I should have) but I could not find them last night.Please make a note of the Martin Taylor gig at Huntingdon Hall, Worcester on Friday 2nd October.I will be in touch when we return from our next holidays.Best wishes,Fred.

james steele
if you like jazz/blues/saxophone, I'm at the Star & Garter pub in Stafford most Sundays... check out www.myspace.com/jamessteelesax - add me! :)

Steve
Listened to the show Chris - very professional ;) Father and son performances of Baby Elephant Walk coming to YouTube soon! "I'm sure you'll enjoy them...!"

paul martin
Hi Chris, great show. Can I request The Bad Plus playing Iron Man (from the 'Give' album, say), or Street Woman from the same album, for old-times sake? Best wishes, Paul.

James
Chris, I cannot offer the erudition of your other correspondents but I would just like to record my gratitude for one of the the all too few programmes for grown-ups on the airwaves. Your programme continues to delight and educate, illuminated by your intelligent commentary. I cannot understand why it is not more widely appreciated and recognised by the BBC management. Thank you so very much for all the hours of enjoyment you continue to deliver.

James Reeves
Dear Chris, Continuing to love the show here in Germany. What I'm finding difficult to understand is why the most articulate and erudite Jazz programme on BBC radio is the most difficult find on the website and seems to be the least recognised. I listen to them all and believe me yours is streets ahead in terms of content and comment. You deserve more recognition by the head boys. Keep it up, we expats rely on it.Best wishes James

HOST REPLIES
Thanks James. The major issue at the moment is that some BBC programmes, including Jazzbeat, have not yet been fully integrated into the BBC's iPlayer system. Your best bet to find the programme is always just to put 'jazzbeat' into our search engine.

Terry Russell
Hi Chris, another fine show on the 29th. It's like an oasis in a desert of non-jazz. I live in Bristol where jazz on the local radio is as rare as a, well, rare thing. Anyway, I thought the bit where you played several versions of Summertime was really good. If you plan on doing something similar with other tunes how about having a look at Hoagy Carmichael's Stardust. A great tune covered by e.g. Coltrane, Armstrong, Miller & of course, Nat 'King' Cole. Thanks for a varied two hours of great music every week. All the best Terry

phil kennedy
the kenny ball tune "so do i"....what was the original tune called, was it "bel ami" ? recorded around 1947 ?

Peter Buckley
Hi Chris,I like the show now I'm used to you, I like the interviews too.One thing puzzles me, when you give the line up on the records you will say, " Joe Bloggs trumpt, Jack Bloggs tenor sax,Mary Bloggs piano, Harry Bloggs on THE drums!" Why add THE?

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - missed your programme last week but I note from the playlist that you were dipping into thet fascinating Garvin Bushell CD again. What an amazing musician! It's truly incredible that somebody whose career started with Mamie Smith's Jazz Hounds in 1921 could be part of John Coltrane's expanded quintet for the celebrated Village Vanguard engagement 40 years later. Not to mention sitting alongside Eric Dolphy in Gil Evans' Individualism sessions in '63 - '64. Fair to say on the Coltrane he played bassoon and the even deeper contrabassoon to add coloration. Nevertheless still awe-inspiring for one career to span jazz pre-history to free form. He was of course coaxing jazz sounds from the bassoon as long ago as 1928 on the Louisiana Sugar Babes date which also included Fats Waller on pipe organ, James P Johnson on piano and Jabbo Smith on trumpet. Real exotica - maybe you could find a track ? You should also sample one of the Coltrane Village Vanguard tracks with Mr Bushell. If you are feeling reckless it's well worth splashing out for Impulse box set of Coltrane's November '61 Vanguard recordings - milestone stuff and the remastering is good enough to make you feel as if you have a ringside seat. Four and half hours of heaven(or may be hell for some even now ?) - best wishes - Mike

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,I have managed to listen for the past week or so and so here are a few more bits of trivia. It was good to hear Mound Bayou a tune that I only heard sung live once by Banu Gibson, in New Orleans, although I do have about four versions on record. I loved Joe Sullivan's Little Rock Getaway as performed by JM's concert jazz band. Also liked Five guys named Moe although one of my favourites is Saturday night fish fry - please play that if you have it. I saw Benny Waters once in Gothenburg when he was then over 90. This very old man got on to the stage but a wonderful young man blew the saxophones. Fred Elizalde employed a lot of American in the late 20s early 30s such as Chelsea Quealy and Adrian Rollini as well as Danny Polo. From last week I loved the Boswell's item. But then I like the trio as well as Connie solo. And if you look at their discogrraphy they sang with all the wonderful swing players of the 30s.I liked your remark about Good Queen Bess which was something like see how you like this. Having purchased the 78 in the mid 40s (which is still in my garage) I knew I was going to like it. One got to know every note of a 78. Wind up the gramophone put on the needle, listen for three minutes and then repeat it over and over again. I am also a fan of Claude Thornhill but did you know at both Irving Fazola and Lee Konitz were with him in the 40s?Fred.

Peter Astwick
'appen I were right!!As they say in Bolton - yes it was Stanley Turrentine on tenor with Jimmy Smith on Sunny SideKeep up the good workPeter

Lance Mitchell
Great show! I only manage to listen as I travel through the area, on my way home to Hampshire from working for a few days in Manchester. I feel so frustrated when I drive out of the reception area that I am tempted to stop and listen till the end of the show.Brilliant music, but the Dave Brubeck and Chris Barber tracks really took me back to my childhood, and my Mum dragging me along to live gigs and telling me that "You can tell a great jazz musician because they can speak to you through their instruments. If you go to New Orleans, you discover how true that is!!!I feel so emotional!

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,I am back and managed to listen to the show last week, apologies for being absent for so long. This means that the trivia is back as well so here goes. Bill Coleman's playing I have always liked from the Luis Russell band in the late 20s, in company with Red Allen, to the to late 30s things in Paris.I have most of Django's 30s recording so it went down especially well. And as for Hawk, what wonderful stuff he blew then full of melody and not dozens and dozens of notes.I think that if Jimmy Hamilton was in the band then he would have been the clarinetist on the wonderful Ellington track which I thought was absolutely exquisite. How some idiots can suggest, and they do, that Duke ceased to be a force after 1940 I do not know.Monica Zetterlund I have known and liked for many years but do not have a single example of her work. However there are something over 150 recordings of "Some other Time" and I have about eight.As for Michel Petrucciani's "C Jam Blues", wonderful piano playing though it was did he get anywhere near the tune or was it just a very long vamp until ready?.Best wishes,Fred.

Peter Thompson (Altrincham).
Chris - a great show, and interesting record selections as always. Tonight (10 June) you said Django R. was born in Paris. I have an LP which says he was born in Liverchies, a commune not far from Charleroi, in Belgium, at that time part of the heart of the Belgian Black Country. On my visits there, I have never seen Liverchies on any map or bus destination indicator, but I did see it listed among the "greater Charleroi" communes in a 1984 regional economic development document.I am always on the look out for more famous Belgians, and it is good to count Django as one of them. Magritte grew up in the Charleroi suburb of Chatelet, and the guy who planned/designed the Paris Metro (Fulgence Bienvenue) was a Belgian, though I have never seen the French concede that !Charleroi is not so far from Paris, so Django would have found his way there pretty easily.Won't be able to listen to next Wednesday's show - off to Belgium for a few days!Very best wishes, Peter.

The WISCM Trust
Hi there.We are a lcoal charity called The WISCM Trust who are putting on a Summer Jazz Party. The event will be held at Keele Hall on 23 July 09. All proceeds will go direct to schools in Northern Uganda, from where i have just come back from a 2 week visit.You can make a difference by supporting us.Please visit www.wiscm.org.uk/jazzparty for more info.Rachel Rimmer is the Jazz band and we also have jazz dancers plus more.Many thanks the WISCM Team

Peter Astwick
Chris - another good show last week.Jimmy Smith version of "Sunny Side" I think was Stanley Turrentine on tenor with Kenny Burrell on guitar.I can't check as I'm not at home at the moment but I feel sure that it's the version from "Back at the Chicken Shack".I'll check when I get back from hols next week.Keep up the good work.Regards Peter

John Maynard
Hi Chris. Yes, it was Andre Previn with Benny Carter & Co. on both "Ain't She Sweet" and "Blue Lou". But it was Ben Webster with Basie & strings playing "Blue And Sentimental", not Lockjaw Davis. Jimmy Smith's "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" was from the 1960 "Back At The Chicken Shack" session with Stanley Turrentine on tenor, not Sonny Rollins, and Kenny Burrell on guitar, but I don't think it featured on the original LP. "Sunny Side Of The Street" was played by the two Sonnys and Dizzy on their "Sonny Side Up" album.

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - Kenneth Hollon - 26/9/09 - 30/9/74 - was quite a prominent tenor man in his day. He helped Billie Holiday find work in the very early part of her singing career and appeared on a number of her records in the late'30s/early '40s. He worked with Louis Jordan in the early '40s. A detailed article about his life and career by the Swiss writer Johnny Simmen appeared in Coda Magazine around '74. Hawkins' original Body And Soul was in fact a studio recording. It was an end of session filler based on a routine he frequently used in live performances. The stuff of legend indeed...best wishes - Mike

Ken Westhead
Hi Chris, I continue to enjoy every Jazzbeat. On the April 24 show you played Arkansas Blues by James P Johnson. However, you made a typically English pronunciation clanger on this, as Arkansas is pronounced as Arkansaw, in the same way as the State name is pronounced...by Americans anyway! :o)Very best wishes from St.HelensKen

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - the BG Sextet track you identified as Royal Garden Blues was I think actually As Long As I Live, complete with the somewhat unusual low register trill Goodman played during the theme statement. The actual version of Royal Garden Blues is well worth hearing too ! This line-up with Cootie Williams was probably the best small group BG ever had. Jamie Cullum's interpretation of God Only Knows was interesting - was the string arrangement influenced by Eleanor Rigby ? There are some further jazzy versions of Brian Wilson songs on Wouldn't It Be Nice - A Jazz Portrait of Brian Wilson (Eagle Records). Contributors include Don Grusin, the Yellowjackets, Elements (featuring Bill Evans - the other one that is) and Eliane Elias. Interesting at least...- best wishes - Mike

Roger Cairns, L.A.
I misspoke. Marian McPartland is, of course, Jimmy's widow not, any longer, his wife.Jimmy died, I think, in the early 90.Sorry 'bout that.- Roger

dave timmis
Great show Chris, especially Skin Deep. I've got it on 78. Please mention Sunday 12th April at the Jug, Newcastle. 1 until 3 Free admission. The Coffin Dodgers with Frank Nicholls and Terry Brunt. Cheers

Peter Astwick
Thanks Chris for the continued excellence of your programme.I must admit that you often play things not quite to my personal taste but "one man's meat etc".Regarding the Lee Konitz and al version of Sextet.You were correct in identifying Gerry Mulliagan and Chet Baker.The bass player was Carson Smith and Larry Bunker (also an excellent vibes player) was on drums.The version you played was recorded in the Hollywood/Los Angeles area on the 30th January 1953.Not bad for 56 years ago was it?Best wishesPeter

Jamie Brownfield
Thanks for playing a track of our CD last night - We are a Quintet, the drummers name 'John Blackburn' was missed off the CD notes! The CD is now available to buy - details are on our myspace.Thanks again,Jamie - Brownfield/Byrne Quintet or B.B.Q.!

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - my turn for the trivia so read on or not to taste ! Going back a couple of weeks you and your producer were speculating as to whether Donald Fagen's Nightfly might have been one of the first digitally recorded albums.In fact it wasn't - according to the Penguin Encyclopedia Of Popular Music in rock terms that honour went to Ry Cooder's Bop Till You Drop released in the UK in August '79, a good 3 years before the CD format became available. I also have the Fagen album on LP and it sounds fine anyway. (By the way recently retried his later Kamakiriad and found it rather bland). On the purely jazz side of the tracks I have an album by the Akiyoshi-Tabackin Big Band - Sumi-e - which was digitally recorded in February, '79 -it was 'made in Japan' where they were probably ahead of the game. Although I know it forwards backwards and inside out it was great to hear San, probably the jazziest side Whiteman ever recorded. It nearly didn't happen at all - in a 1983 interview arranger Bill Challis recalled that he overslept after working on the arrangement through the night.Following an emergency phone call a dishevelled Challis arrived late but clutching the precious arrangement !Some quick copying ensued I presume. The scored solo section for 3 cornets/trunpets was well ahead of it's time and sounds like multitracked Bix - wonderful. Could you now play the Whiteman/Bix/Bing From Monday On preferably in the take recorded on February 13, 1928 which is underpinned by Steve Brown's driving bass(he'd left by the time the other takes were recorded a couple of weeks later). Bix is stunning on this. You played a Western Swing recording of Gin Mill Blues - could we have Joe Sullivan's magisterial original sometime ? On a slightly downbeat note I surely cannot be the only Jazzbeat listener to be a follower of John Hellings' Saturday Big Bands which has been axed after 8 years as part of the BBC schedules springclean - a real shame - the bulk of what John played was of interest to jazz listeners, not to mention the sterling work he did in promoting local/regional bands and musicians - best wishes - Mike

Neil Forsyth
Thanks for an interesting series of shows. I try to listen every week via the Internet. What is offered is a lot better than what is on offer here in Germany. Western Swing; There is a fascinating book about Western Swing called "Lone Star Swing. The Scottish author Duncan Maclean spent a number of weeks travelling around Texas interviewing musicians. Some of the musicians you mentioned were still alive in 1995 or 6 when he did the research. If you can get the book it is well worth reading.BfNNeil

Frank Peake
Hi ChrisI listen to your show every week on a mini disc recording(my one and only gig night is Wednesday).The recording usually lasts me a week in short sessions and I find enjoyment to a greater or lesser degree in all your selections.Particularly the Clifford Brown track in the last show which I have got as 'Gherkin for Perkin'.Could the clarinet player on the Peterson track be Buddy de Franco?

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Herewith trivia from two weeks shows.Loved your Talmadge (Tal) Farlow who i saw on a couple of occasions, once with Red Norvo playing the things they did with Mingus in that fine trio,Freddy Gardner was everywhere in the 30's and there are dozens of sessions, outside of the dance bands, that feature him.Loved the childrens songs.The Holiday from the wonderful "Songs for Distingue Lovers" featured Sweets and Ben."Why don't you do right" was Peggy Lee's first big hit in the 1941! recording with BG. The 78 is still with me.Do we have to have the road reports which report nothing but just say there is nothing to report? If there is nothing to report then do not report it.The Hampton came from the wonderful period between 1937-1940 when Eli Oberstein, head of recording at RCA Victor allowed Hamp to take personnel from any band in New York into the studio and make whatever he wanted. What wonderful days. The results are on two 3 LP sets on French Vogue or five (I think) CDs in a Mosaic box set. I could loan you the LPs.I did not enjoy the Pat Metheny and found it repetitive and very boring but no doubt others will have thought it wonderfulI have the book "The best of Jazz Score" so here is an example from Digby Fairweather. "I like the story of two American Musicians walking along a street when they see a newspaper billboard claiming "Indiana Bridge Disaster". One turns to the other and remarks, "Indiana hasn't got a bridge, has it?"Best wishes,Fred.

Bill
Still no music from Mr Atzmon.Do you read me Chris?

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - I am a Dexter Gordon fan but I have to say I found that version of Body And Soul somewhat tortured even down to the odd bum note - it certainly wasn't Dexter at his best. Re Pete's comments - yes I do remember Jazz Score. The dry humour of the late Ronnie was certainly a highspot but there was always a certain element of 'set-up' to it - really strange how Acker Bilk always managed to answer all the questions relating to 'modern' jazz ! Of course Acker has always been quite open-minded - his '68 Blue Acker album with Stan Tracey's Big Brass worked remarkably well - best wishes - Mike

Pete Cargill
Hi Chris, I wonder if Fred or Mike remember Jazz Score on BBC Radio 2 a few years ago. You played Count Basie's The King which reminded me as it was the signature tune. It had Ronnie Scott, Acker Bilk, John Dankworth among others compered by Benny Green. Slim Gaillard was a guest once, very funny guy. Ronnie Scott's corny jokes were always a must such as when someone mentioned Ken Colyer, he said ''I knew his brother: I'll be glad when you're dead you ras . . . !'' Still waiting for IJ with BV. Cheers,Pete

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,I see that Mike and I are still your two busiest correspondents so where are all the others? Someone, somewhere must have something to say.So to this weeks trivia.Queen Bess is now in my garage with all my other 78s of 50 plus years ago.Will you play something please from Mrs Gascoyne - singer Trudy Kerr.The rubbish printed on compilations manifested itself in a tune I have not heard before i.e. "It never entered my head" and all these years I had believed that it was "It never entered my mind".I did not like the Dexter Gordon very much - no vibrato and cold sounding but you cannot please us all, all the time.I liked the justaposition of Coltrane and Bechet. Many would say from the wonderful to the awful or vice versa depending on what you like but I think that it is good that you include all types and so perhaps broaden some listeners tastes.Last night I heard Bryan Corbett at Huntingdon Hall. Beautiful tone, very relaxed and with a fine quartet which I enjoyed very much.Keep up the good work.Fred.

John Gorman
Very much enjoy the show each week. I'm listening from China at the moment and from Canada when I'm home. I agree that it's the best show since Humphrey passed on. Any chance of some Rene Thomas on the show?

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - re Fred's query on your signature tune - it must surely be Mingus' Fables Of Faubus, I assume in the version from Mingus Ah Hum. Lush Life was very definitely the sole work of Billy Strayhorn, not Ellington. 'Swee'Pea' wrote this several years before he met Ellington although the song was not published until 1949. One of the greatest songs of all time. How Strayhorn - musically precocious though he was - came to dream up this sophisticated, evocative opus as a teenager in 1930's Pittsburgh remains something to wonder at(bad syntax but you know what I mean). Also of course the title of David Hajdu's superb biography(Granta)- best wishes - Mike

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,It is Wednesday afternoon and I am listening again and have two further comments.Thad Jones - what a wonderful musical family the Jones family were with Elvin and Thad gone but Hank still performing. I recall Thad and Joe Newman coming down from their seats high up at the back of the band to the front to play "The Midgets" when the wonderful Basie band were in town. We saw them many times and always with a swinging rhythm section.We had a wonderful audience for The Charleston Chasers on Friday. We had about 240 and it was a terrific evening, i.e. one where a profit is made (I hope) which is not always the case.Fred.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,When I look at the message board it seems that Mike Vawdrey and I hog the show so where are all the others for there must be hundreds out there who should have something to say.Anyway herewith some trivia from a couple of shows. Firstly the KC 6 & 7 of which there were two versions, I think, firstly in the 30s and then 50/60s.The Hines track you played could have been called the Duke Ellington orch for they seemed to be all Eliingtonians apart from Pee Wee.I only saw Blossom Dearie once and that was when Birmingham boasted a Ronnie Scott's Club in Broad Street.The American guitarist Gary Potter, (if I heard you right), is in fact a Liverpudlian.Stew Pletcher would have played the solo in the Red Norvo track. His son Tom played in lots of groups including the Bix Soundtrack with adaptions of Bix recordings by Bob Wilber. Eddie Sauter (sorta) wrote masses for Norvo, Goodman the Sauter Finegan Orch and also Focus featuring Stan Getz.You have played Gene Harris before when you played a Mary Stallings track some time ago for he was the pianist there. He was someone I always wanted to see and was thrilled when he was booked at Huntingdon Hall in Worcester. But he let me down and died before he got there.I see that no one took up the suggestion about your signature tune the title of which still remains unknown to me.I enjoyed the Roberta Flack very much but hadn't realised how enjoyable her piano playing could be.Fred.

Bill
See the photo of Gilad Atzmon every time I log on but no music as yet? I hear that he is doing a Charlie Parker with strings version of his own,should be interesting.Love the Jazz as always,unmissable.Bill.S.Wales

Ken Westhead
Greetings to you Chris from Shandong Province, China, where I'm on holiday. I'm listening at the moment to your recent programme (on cassette) of Arne Domnerus, pronounced by Humph as Arnee Dom nee rus, as I recall。Always enjoy your show, and looking forward to catching up with you live in late February. I also really enjoyed the show with your guest Fred Stone.Best wishes, Ken Westhead

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - great that you aired another Whiteman side from the Bix/Tram period. Not so great that you failed to mention the highspot - Bix's beautiful 16 bars, played (literally I presume) into a hat - most musicians wore them back then and I guess they came in handy as an informal mute. All this reminds me of your mini feature on Rex Stewart the other week. Rex was one of the few non white musicians to have assimilated elements of the Beiderbecke style and famously reconstructed the Bix solo on Fletcher Henderson's 1931 remake of Singin' The Blues.Bix and Rex knew each other - they shared a locker when the Goldkette and Henderson bands were playing opposite each other at the Roseland Ballroom in October, 1926 - legend has it that the Goldkette crew 'won' that particular battle. Rex's later career in music was by no means as sparse as you indicated - he continued to play at least sporadically until his sudden death in September, 1967. He also had a second string as a writer - many of his mid '60s Downbeat articles are collected in Jazz Masters Of The Thirties(Da Capo) and further unpublished writings were assembled into a posthumous autobiography under the title Boy Meets Horn(Bayou Press). Fascinating reading. The Henderson reunion you referred to - The Big Reunion - has been reissued on Fresh Sound. A companion album - The Big Challenge - which found Rex locking horns with his old Ellington section mate Cootie Williams, Coleman Hawkins vs Bud Freeman etc may or may not be currently in circulation but is well worth seeking out. Oh yeah, always good to hear Horace Silver's Song For My Father(Steely Dan nicked the riff of course !) but sobering to think I first heard it nearly 40 years ago! - keep up the good work - best wishes - Mike

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,I am back again. I cannot remember how you spelt the name of the guitarist but if it was Farquer then it is pronounced "Farker"Do the boys Hall I think you will find.Fred.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,I was out jazzin' last Wednesday and so it is Tuesday evening and I am just listening to your show so here is this week's trivia.I think that the arranger of Skyliner was Billy May but someone will put me right. Certainly he did write some arrangements for Charlie around this time.The Bud Shank track was by The LA4 - Bud Shank, Laurindo Almeida ( a wonderful classical guitarist - also with Kenton) Ray Brown and Jeff Hamilton.Fred.

Pete Dixon
I think that Billie Holiday track you played was originally issued on the album 'Songs for Distingue Lovers' rather than 'One One For My Baby'. Great show by the way, thanks to the BBC for the iPLayer allowing those of us outside of the Potteries to catch some quality music.

Joni Keen
Hi Chris, Euan Stevenson a fellow graduate of yours from the Birmingham Conservatoire and musical director on my new ‘Album Fragile’ suggested that I should send you a copy. In the post as you read.I’m not very well known ‘South of the border’ but here’s hoping you might be able to change that for me.The two songs I would suggest for your listeners are: Track 9 ‘I remember you and Track 10 Jersey Girl by Tom Waits. I appreciate that 'Air Time' is a precious commodity and there is no guarantee it gets played but I'd love to hear what you think of the album.Hope you like the Album Joni Keen

Fred Stone
This week's trivia. Koto Song came from Jazz Impressions of Japan but no doubt yours was on a compilation. Singin' The Blues has always been known as one of Leon Bismark Beiderbecke's finest solos. Personnel for Along Came Betty, if it is the original 1958 Blue Note recording, is Morgan, Golson. Timmons, Jymie Merritt and Blakey but Blakey recorded it about six times. You must, at some stage have told us what your signature is, but I do not know the title. Have you ever thought of varying your signature tune? One idea of mine is to let your listeners pick it. Obviously you cannot give them carte blanche because of the difficulty of accessing their choices. However you could ask them to pick a recording from the current show and, allowing for the choices to flood in, use the the favourite two or three weeks down the line. My wife would say, another crazy idea. Fred

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - re Dave McKenna - sure I recently read a couple of obituaries - did he die around November ? My only personal sighting was in 1978 whne he appeared with Bob Wilber in Newcastle-under-Lyme. He was struggling with the aftermath of a stomach bug at the time but still played superbly - Mike

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,This week's trivia. I enjoyed the De Franco, McKenna and Cohn and thought what a pity it is that Dave McKenna's wonderful individual sound with its strong bass lines will never be heard on record again. Daryl Sherman, who recorded with him many times, said that he has arthritis and his playing days are over.Arne Domnerus had a nickname "Dompan" hence the title. Obviously you do not take Jazz Journal International for this was the record of the year in their critics poll a few years ago. "Barney going Easy" is really "I'm stepping out Goombye". Try the album Blue Rose by Rosie Clooney and Duke Ellington for confirmation. Collaboration by Jan Lundgren and Pete Jolly also got the JJI accolade one year and so I have them both in my collection.Fred Stone

Dan Nicholls
I'll second that, JazzBeat for national radio!!!

Chris Gumbley
Thank-you for your heart-warming messages. A Happy, Jazz-Filled New Year to you all!

catherine in Washington, DC
Hello Chris, thank you for two excellent shows to end the old year and begin the new, looking forward to another great year of your show.

James Reeves
Another superb show on New Year's Eve. Intelligent and entertaining. Should be 3 hours every week and on the national network. A real gem. Best wishes for 2009.

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - some belated comments about your recent programmes. I think Fred has dug out all you need to know about Andy Razaf although it may be worth mentioning that his most frequent collaborator was Fats Waller. Re the IGot Rhythm selection - maybe it was close to the way it was done originally but I will never be persuaded that the late Ethel Merman's tuneless bellowing should be graced with the description of 'singing'! Neither am I a great fan of seasonal jazz ditties but if you want to check out one or two for the future you could try Lionel Hampton's Gin For Christmas(I prefer malt whisky myself but the sentiment is fine), Hamp's 1964 outing on Jingle Bells from You Better Believe It(Impulse!) which from memory sports a very acceptable Ben Webster solo and Miles Davis' 62 ? Blue Christmas with 'hip' vocal by Bob Dorough. I won't even go there with Roland Kirk's We Free Kings or the MJQ's England's Carol which cropped up again recently on JRR. Oh yes and didn't the World's Greatest Jazz Band do a Christmas album back in the '70s ? Lots of seasonal blues of course if you choose to go down that path(frequently concerning what a terrible time the performer is having) ....Enough of that. Re your 'jazzing the classics' show - a major omission was Elington/Strayhorn's re-interpretations of The Nutcracker and Peer Gynt. In spite of a mixed reception on their initial release in the early '60s these have stood the test of time and worked remarkably well. Perhaps you could dig a sample out ? Pianist/composer Lalo Schifrin has also been very active in this field - I'll admit to quite enjoying some of his Jazz Meets The Symphony outings from the '90s. Better still is Schifrin/Sade(1966), a witty and entertaining blend of jazz and baroque. It was reissued on a limited edition CD in the late '90s although that may now be even scarcer than the original LP(both Verve). Gramophone Library again ? Easier to find is The Return Of The Marquis de Sade - more of the same from 2001 - on Schifrin's own Aleph label. The whole area of 'symphonic jazz' from Paul Whiteman on leading into the many and varied attempts at blending jazz with symphonic/'straight' music is a wideopen field well worth the odd exit from the motorway(as it were) - all the very best for 2009 -Mike

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Gillian came out with Anitra's Dance immediately for your Grieg piece.I very much enjoyed Sarah Coleman who I have only heard on record. The Marion Montgomery track was really wonderful. She was such a lovely person to talk to which I did on many occasions. One of my customers ran MMAS the Marion Montgomery Appreciation Society. She told me that when she spoke to Marion about it she said "well if you think there ought to be one then go ahead and do it" which she did.Also enjoyed the Bessie Smith with the fine Louis Armstrong and Charlie Green obbligatos.Recently I heard a programme featuring Rod Stewart, who is now making his fifth album of the Great American Songbook and he was saying how his, now, lower voice fits the songs better and how much more challenging they were than what he sings to make money.Fred.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,I have looked up Andy Razaf, who died in 1973, on Wikipedia. His real name was either Andy Razafinkarefo or Razafkeriefo (he used both) so I was nearly correct. He was the nephew of Queen Ranavalona of Madagascar and wrote words for many of Americas finest composers Aint Misbehavin', Honeysuckle rose, Stompin at the Savoy, Memories of you etc are credited to him.Fred.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Herewith this weeks trivia. Andy Razaf real name something like Andy!! Razafierenko (or something like that) was, I believe, either an East! African prince or was descended from one. I cannot find any reference to him so this is from memory but Mike Vawdrey might know.Claude Thornhill's signature tune was Snowfall so perhaps that induced the Christmassy feel.Thilo Wolf should be pronounce Teelo Volf if you wish to say it as a German might say it.Best wishes for 2009.Fred.

John Maynard
Dear ChrisWhoever was in charge of the iplayer thingy wasn't told you were doing a 3 hour special on Christmas Eve. While you were still opening your presents, internet listeners with nothing better to do on Christmas Day missed the first hour, the show starting halfway through Humph's version of I Got Rhythm. Someone must have told him, cos the next day it started at the beginning - the only problem now is it finishes after precisly 37 minutes, halfway through Lester's solo. Can someone fix it please before next Wednesday. Happy New Year.

Webmaster replies:
There have been quite a few problems with the implementation of the iPlayer for BBC Local Radio. We can only apologise and hope that iPlayer sorts itself out soon! In the meantime, we have re-uploaded the whole show so it should now be there for your listening pleasures!

Jan Buijsse
Dear Chris, wonderful Christmas program. Alas, it stops after 36:55 each time I try to listen again. I hope I can listen this program one of these days. Thank you. Jan Buijsse

Sheila & Brian
Another missed opportunity Chris! As long-term listeners we always enjoyed Mel's pre-Christmas feature of classic seasonal tunes rendered in a jazz/blues style. Last year, not one Christmas tune - we've just checked your playlist, but excused you as it was your first Christmas show. This year, a Christmas Eve show for goodness sake and... nothing again, except for two tunes chosen by Fred Stone which you certainly sounded less than enthusiastic about playing. Come on Chris! However you might feel about Christmas, some of us actually quite enjoy it - and would like to hear it celebrated in our favourite genre of music, especially on the 24th December! Maybe you'd like to step out of 'your' comfort zone next year, please?

Jan-Clare
Hi Chris - still listening even through the now-tortuous route to the player. Please get someone to make a better picture of you - I am sure you are not really as grim as the current one makes you look!!! I enjoy hearing the familiar again, usually, and look forward to pieces by familiar names but not usually played. Thanks for all the commentary adding to listening pleasure.Thanks also to all the informative messagers on this board - and Seasonal Greetings to one and all.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Every time I write I seem to start with Dear Christ and the t gets deleted. I guess I left it in recently. The penalty I suppose of not looking at the keys as I type.Claude Luter was the band that Sydney Bechet performed with in France all the way through the 50s and into the 60s. They made dozens of recordings together so he is the Luter who wrote the composition that you played.You did not say whether you wanted the Time Life sets that I offered you.Fred.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,It used to be easy to find out how to leave a message whilst the programme was running but not any more. Another improvment!!! I suppose.This weeks trivia is about "The Chant" which, of course I still have on 78. LP and CD. Omer Simeon was known as Omer Some One as opposed to Jimmy Noone who was known as Jimmy No One.Fred.

Kai
Is the current mess where we are showed around several screens due only to technical problems or are you ending the Listen again on the net due to rights problems?

Malone
No JazzBeat on-line here in New Zealand this week. The "new link" doesn't work for me.

James Reeves
Love the show Chris. Listen 2 or 3 times a week here in Germany. Thanks enormously. Keep it up. James

Neill Ward
Anyone else having a problem listening on line? Jazzbeat appears to have dropped off the plot with the new 'improved' iPlayer

Reply from webmaster: We're sorry that there are some temporary problems with the links to the new iPlayer - normal service will resume very shortly. In the meantime, there is a new link on the Jazzbeat page which works.

roger nuttall
Chris1. I listen to your show every week on iplayer, and continue to find it the best jazz programme on the radio.2. I would like to make a plug for the Walsall Jazz Orchestra ( WJO)with whom I have no tie. The WJO is probably the most underrated band in the country. Whenever I see them, they strike me as every bit as good as the BBC Big Band.Unaccountably, they have problems finding venues,but have now tied up with the " Lighthouse" on Friar St Wolverhampton. Their next concert is 2030 on Mon 26 January. I am in touch with their musical director, John Hughes, and he has said that he could easily send one/more of the bands CDs to you, if you would like that?Best, Roger Nuttall

Fred Stone
I am back again. When I try to listen to the show I get a message that BBC Iplayer cannot direct me to your show. Are there problems?Fred

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Something has happened to the show for normally I click "Favourites" and the show plays but not tonight but I will sort it out.Herewith this week's trivia."Why don't you do right" was one of the first Benny Goodman 78s that I bought in the mid 40s. It featured Norma Dolores Egstrom also known as Peggy Lee.I enjoyed the Ray Brown track and saw that group at Cheltenham one year.Is Freddy Fisher the German Spike Jones? I say that because of Gesundheit heard during the recording.I was one who went, many times, to see Paul Desmond and his leader Dave Brubeck. We found much of Brubeck's repetitious hammering on the keys boring but the man who just lolled against the piano was wonderful. However Cassandra I really enjoyed.Nick Payton is the son of the dentist in Chipping Campden. And who lived in Chipping Campden and taught Nick - Bob Wilber. The last time I saw Nick's dad he said that he, Nick, was living in South America with his wife.I love the tune "The way you look tonight" and also the tune "I concentrate on you " which you played in its stead. Some one wasn't concentrating.And I also loved the Anita O'Day and who can forget that wonderful black and white dress and that stunning hat. Did she also sing "Sweet Georgia Brown" or is my memory letting me down.You said that you had obtained some big band tracks from London. I have some of the Time Life 3 LP sets(about 6 I think) that are going spare. Would they be any use to you? Do you know about them?Best wishes,Fred.

Bill Cranfield
As a freelance journalist, working out of Spain, I have lived my life on deadlines, so I usually manage to catch your show on the Internet just hours before it is due to be deleted. Glad I did this week (Nov. 28) as I think it was one of the best yet — a wonderful mix of undisputed classics and not-so-well-known minor masterpieces. Jimmy Lyons, incidentally ("Line For Lyons") was a well-known San Francisco jazz DJ and the founder of the Monterey Jazz Festival. Bill Cranfield

Neil Forsyth
Thanks Chris for an excellent show. If only my German station could play anything similar. One minor quibble I think the Chzbby Jackson "Mouldy Fig Stomp" played last week was intended to be a parody of Dixieland. Mouldy Fig is what the boppers called the trad fans in those far off days.

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - think the confusion about Alfie arises from the fact that the theme tune was Bacharach/David but the actual film score was the work of Sonny Rollins(allegedly with some uncredited input from our own Stan Tracey) - best wishes - Mike

DAVID BALL
HELP! ANYONE KNOW PRESENT WHEREABOUTS/STATUS OF DIZ DISLEY?

Kai
Like your show very much, but miss the playlist for Nov. 19.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Herewith this week's comments. Playing the Lester Young made me get my copy out this morning and enjoy it again. I have not played it for many years. I recall seeing Lester when JATP played for the East Coast Flood Fund before you were born. Flip Phillips, Oscar, Ray Brown, Roy Eldridge, Charlie Shavers, Willie Smith, Ella and co were all there a wonderful evening from 55 years ago.Enjoyed Ella which I bought when it was first released. People thought that it was the first time anyone had sung one composers work but Lee Wiley recorded a few 78s in 1939/40 of one composer so she was the first.Karin Krog is one of my favourite singers and that track you played is from one of my favourite albums.The Billie was from one her best albums Lady in Satin - voice absolutely shot but a wonderful album.I very much enjoyed the Scandinavian sax player. They so often have a wonderful bleakness about their playing just like the frozen north.Best wishes,Fred.

Dave in Inskip
Chris, always a great show, but for me, marred by a problem which has just appeared. I have been listening "again" for a number of years using Windows XP, no problems, I have this last week changed my computer for a Vista machine and have noticed what appears to be an attempt by Radio Stoke to deter downloaders or copyists. This is a 4 or 5 note buzz which happens at random intervals throughout your show and each time lasts about a second. When giving out the Gig list, your voice becomes distorted, on your opening Stan Kenton track it occured 5 times. I listen "again" to radio 2, 3,and 7 but this problem does not appear, Stoke is the only one where it does. Perhaps if any other listener can shout if they get the same problem, or your sound engineer Mark is aware, perhaps you might mention this on your programme,and maybe come up with a fix. Thanks in anticipation, Dave.

Host replies: Thanks for your feedback Dave. A couple of people here have checked the original programme, edited audio and, like yourself via listen again - and we could not hear the noises you mention. Perhaps it was a streaming problem at the time you were listening. To make you aware, we don't use any 'audio deterents' either. If other web-users have had a similar problem then please file your comments here. Otherwise it sounds, thankfully, like a very isolated incident.

Fred Stone.
A little trivia for today. The Jazz Club Mystery Hot Band were all members of Glenn Miller's AEF Orchestra who decided to record some titles at Le Jazz Club Francais in Paris for $40 per musician at the end of the war. A terrific sum then.They did this because Don Haynes, who took over after Glenn disappeared, demoted Peanuts Hucko, Mel Powell and Bernie Privin to private with a loss of earnings.All these tracks were issued on Chris Barber's Timeless label as Glenn Miller's GI's in Paris.Fred.

Janet Rodger (Mart's wife)
Hello Chris, I see from your playlists that you played a couple of tracks from "Allmart" in March. Thank you! I wonder if you have any of Mart's other CDs. If I can send some to you, please let me know. Our e-mail address isjazzmart@manchesterjazz.co.ukRegards, Janet.

Fred Stone
Dear Christ,Try eedee gormay - Please play her "The gentleman is a dope" if you can get it.Fred.

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - pleased you've been dipping into some of the Whitemans with Bix and Tram(not to forget young Mr Crosby of course). Missed your introduction to You Took Advantage Of Me but I don't think you mentioned that it contains one of the two recorded chase choruses between Bix and Tram(the other is Borneo recorded the same month on a Trumbauer session). This was a new concept at the time and 80 years on - not to mention almost 46 since I first heard it ! - it still sounds remarkably fresh. Should add that Frank Trumbauer's instrument was the now archaic C Melody sax(not alto as I think you stated).Lester Young developed his unique sound by trying to copy Tram on the tenor instrument. A lot of water under that particular bridge .... best wishes - Mike

Dan Nicholls
Thoroughly enjoyed the last show. When's the 'Copenhagen Special' gonna be then? Can your techies fix a show on location? There's everything from dixie to the squeakiest of gates here!

ron mccormick
A good definition of jazz according to Artie Shaw "American informal music"Too much saxophone--When you've said Hodges and Hamilton you've just about completed the list of great playersIt's a pity that more bands don't include the tuba in the melody line as per Marty Paich the doyen of West Coast Jazz.The late and much lamented Benny Green once said "It's amazing that good jazz can be produced by just playingthe tune" I liked Oscar but he never gave the tune a chance apart from those wonderful sessions with the great Fred Astaire.

John Maynard
Chris, In coupling the names of those who have died this year with your tribute to Neal Hefti, how on earth could you miss out Hump!!!?

Peter (Bolton)
Too many gliches spoilt my listening via the "Listen again" facility.It was like listening to old cratchy LPs in places.Any chance the boffins can sort for next time?

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Hear is some more unsolicited information from within what I laughingly call a brain.Horace Henderson was Fletcher Henderson's brother and wrote some of the arrangements that Fletcher played.Lennie of Lena and Lennie was Lennie Hayton, her husband and composer and arranger.Everybodys Jumpin' comes from the wonderful recording by Brubeck, Louis, Lambert,Hendricks and Ross and Carmen McRae called The Real Ambassadors. Where has it gone - I cannot find it.Steps was, I think, Barney Bigard's nickname but I am open to correction on this. Somebody will know.I recall when Joe Newman and Thad Jones used to come down to the front of the stage (no section mikes) with the Basie band and do The Midgets. I last saw Joe at the Strathallan in Birmingham. Kathy Stobart said "and now Joe Newman" which she repeated three times before somebody whispered in her ear. She then banged her head and said Kath, Kath, Kath make sure they are around before you announce anyone - I have to tell that Joe is sleeping and will be down in a little while.The full tile of Strayhorn is Song for Strayhorn. There is a wondurful version by the Gerry Mulligan Orchestra on the LP/CD Walk on the Water.Let me know if you want me to stop this trivia.Best wishes,Fred. .

Mike Carolan
I think you will find that Horace Henderson was Fletgher Henderson's brother

Bill Lee
glitches in Oct 16th prog.spoilt it somewhat,whole bits missing.Come on you boffins,fingers out!

Fred Stone.
Dear Chris,My usual rubbish comments about the show. Firstly John RT Davies who was not only a good musician but also excelled at getting wonderful sounds from 78s on to CD. He really was one of the best at this task and you may notice that many reissues of 20s/30s music sound wonderful because of his skill.I enjoyed TDs Marie not because of the band vocal or TDs trombone but the wonderful trumpet solo between by the great Bernard "Bunny" Berigan then at the height of his powers.Is Chris Savory the same one that used to come into the shop and had a collectors programme on BBC H & W?Kenny Davern had such a distinctive sound in Soprano Summit that made him so identifiable. When they played at Hanley Castle High School many years ago the BBC recorded it for their weekly jazz programme. What a wonderful night captured on tape by me.I recall seeing Illinois Jacquet with a big band at Brecon one year. What an exciting band, driven by the maestro, it proved to be.I would like to correspond with Mike Vawdrey so would you give him my email address please.Fred.

john dick
Meade Lux Lewis plays BOOGIE-WOOGIE not R&B

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - may be mistaken but the track you played as by the Golden Gate Quartet sounded much more like a vintage calypso to me ! - Mike

Colin - Auckland, New Zealand
ChrisLike your show.Plenty of information about the Golden Gate Quartet on the web by using "Google".Best wishes and keep up the good work.

Jonathan Mason
That was surely Larry Adler on harmonica with Django Reinhardt.Its on the album Mouth Organ Virtuoso.

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - this is a re-run as my previous message evidently vanished into the ether. Anyway it was a response to Fred Stone's enquiry about Lucky Thompson. He died on July 30, 2005 in Seattle. He'd evidently suffered from Alzheimers in later years but had permanently quit the the music scene in the mid'70s after a stint teaching at Dartmouth College. Around the turn of the '90s he was living in a log cabin in Oregon(?) but this led to problems with hypothermia and he was persuaded to move into sheltered accomodation. There were indeed reports of him living rough on the street at some point. Altogether a sad end to a very distinguished career. His last recordings were for the Groove Merchant label around '72. By this stage he was playing as much soprano as tenor and majoring on his own compositions, all of this indicating a change in direction. He often complained about lack of recognition although he certainly wasn't underecorded. I've personally presented 4 hour long recitals on Lucky at Macclesfieled Jazz and Blues Society and there's still room for more when/if I have the inclination. One other point - could you play something to mark the recent untimely death of the South African pianist Bheki Msleku ? - many thanks, best wishes - Mike

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,The harmonica player was Larry Adler. Fred.

Malone
Hello Chris. This is Malone from New Zealand who listens on the internet.Yes, Tickle Toe must surely rank amongst one of the most swinging performances of all time. I remember recording it on my reel-to-reel tape recorder in the late 1960s from, I think, Willis Conover's VOA Jazz Hour - although you and most of your audience will be far too young to remember that progamme. With the passing of time, and reel-to-reel tape recorders, it's gone, but I'd always remembered it as the ultimate in two-tenor chases. I never thought I'd hear it again - so thanks. Might be worth looking into Dexter Gordon / Wardell Gray's "The Chase". Another gem in the same idiom.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,I am sorry but "Uptown" by Maxine Sullivan has been deleted for years. I got my copy from Amazon second hand at a very good price.Incidentally the label is Carl Jefferson's Concord label.

Chris Savory
Hi Chris, just thought I'd mention that on Sunday September 28th we are holding a Record & CD Fair at the Cobridge Community Centre, S-o-T from 10am-4pm. There will be a LOT of jazz there - mainly CD but some vinyl - everything from early Nat King Cole Trio to Miles Davis, UK trad jazz, Cassandra Wilson, Peggy Lee, Artie Shaw, Glen Miller and so much more. We'd love to see the listener turning up for a browse. A mention on air would be a bonus.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Herewith some comments about this weeks fine show.Firstly how could I ever have mixed up the 1929 recording of One hour with the 60s recording. Did I even hear it, I ask myself, or had I dropped off to sleep which happens often on a Thursday evening after tennis. Whatever! I thought that you mentioned Glenn Miller who was on the 1929 recording - or did I dream that. And the fade - they did not fade in the 20s. Apologies to both of you.Eli Lucky Thompson had such a distinctive sound which I love. Do you have any of the things he made, in Paris, with Gerard Pochonet? And what happened to him? He was known to have given up playing and was living on the streets. Any one know?Neil Stacey was, many years ago, playing at the Upton Jazz Festival with The Kimbara Brothers. So called because they used Kimbara guitars. Unbeknown to us my daughter brought the whole band home and when my wife went to make a cup of tea in the morning she tripped over Neil and others on the floor downstairs.Paul Dunmall lives in this area and was a customer of mine. I have not seen him since I gave up at Christmas 2000. I find the music interesting and sometimes hauntingly beautiful but not some thing that I would buy.I you want the personnel of Kenton's Begin the Beguine I am sure that I could find it.Best wishes,Fred.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,It is now 4.15 on Wednesday and I have only just finished listening to last weeks show. Your son has excellent taste for I thought that "I should care" was delightful. Also very much enjoyed Karin Krog who I have admired, and collected, for many years. I have only three LPs and three CDs or hers so do I need more. Not the sort of question to ask Gillian. One of the LPs has Warne Marsh, another Dexter Gordon and the third Bengt Hallberg although the tunes that you have played are not on it.She has been around a long time and is, I believe, still recording although she must be over 70.Best wishes,Fred.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris ,Listening on the internet again. The Nat Cole that you featured really comes from a wonderful Capitol LP/CD called After Midnight and featured the Nat Cole Trio with John Collins gtr, Charlie Harris bs, and Lee Young (Lester's brother)ds.Featured artists were Harry Edison (the track you played) Willie Smith, Juan Tizol and Stuff Smith. You should get the album, it is still available. All the tracks are as good as the one that you played. Best wishes,Fred.I think you will find that Till Tom Special should really be under Benny Goodman's name with Hamp being one of the musicians in the group.Fred.

Kai
Good show but where are the latest playlist?

joe from flitwick
just discovered your great show

Jim Willerton
I have only just caught up with your programme of last Wednesday (27 Aug - exellent, as usual) when you played "I got rhythm" featuring Buster Bailey on clarinet. You said you had no further details, so I thought I would supply a few. Hope you don't mind.The original track was actually entitled "Rhythm, rhythm" and was recorded 14 April 1937, by a pick-up group led by Lionel Hampton and billed as "Lionel Hampton and his Orchestra". It was issued in this country on an HMV plum label 78, B8597 in their Swing Music series (1937 No. 152) and according to Edgar Jackson the personnel was: Hampton (vib), Bailey (clt), johnny Hodges (alto), Jess Stacy (pno), Alan Reuss (gtr), John Kirby (bs) and Cozy Cole (ds) The track was reissued on a French RCA Victor LP (Black & White Jazz series Vol. 20, RCA 730.640) in the early seventiesI actually bought the 78 (in 1948, cost me 4s 8d) for the other side : "China Stomp", a version of "Chinatown my Chinatown" featuring Hampton doing his two-fingered piano bit. You might like to give that a spin sometime, it's quite an interesting novelty.Cheers, and keep up the good work,Jim Willerton, London

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Please say Warbash (war) and not Wobash and please an old man.Fred

Fred Stone
Dear Chris.I slipped up just now I mean't Cottontail. I loved Quincy's tune The midnight sun will never set.I have had that version and a wonderful one by Harry Arnold, the Swedish bandleader for many years.Fred.Fred

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,It is Monday evening and having been away last week I am listening on the internet and have just heard my friends Hanna, husband Phil and Chris playing. We have enjoyed their company so much over the last few years when they were at the Upton Jazz Festival. Herewith my usual rubbish comment, only one this week, about the show. Something Cool by Shirley Luster, wife of Bob Cooper, also known as the Misty Miss Christy was indeed the title of the album. However the band was led by arranger Pete Rugolo and not Stan Kenton although some Kenton musicians were involved.Great problems with the broadcast this week for the sound disappears about about every few minutes and then reappears at exactly the same place about 15 seconds later. The sound disappeared five times in Honeysuckle Rose Was I the only one with this fault?Fred.

Roger Cairns, L.A.
Hi Chris,It's great you've discovered Karrin Allyson. Check out her versions of 'Joy Spring' and 'Life Is A Groove' and, if you enjoy latin stuff, her new CD 'Imagina' is a blast.Wonderful show, as ever. Thanks Chris. - All the best, Roger.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,This weeks comments on the show.Julie London - Mad about the boy - written by Noel Coward. She was the wife of Bobby Troup who wrote Route 66 which you played recently.Personnel for the wonderful Song for my father was - Carmell Jones,tpt, Joe Henderson,tnr, Horace Silver,pno, Teddy Smith,bs and Roger Humphries,ds. That is if the recording was from the Blue Note album which it sounded like to me.Grachan Moncur either 2nd or 3rd, I am not sure which, is the correct name.I read Mike Vawdrey's comments but still do not know whether it was the Mound City Blue Blowers or Jazz Reunion. All my Mosaic sets have been Christmas/Birthday gifts from wife or daughters - take note.Fred.

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - no need for Fred to apologise re One Hour - I have both versions including like Fred the original on 78(on which One Hour is billed as 'slow foxtrot' if memory serves me right). Incidentally I don't think the aforemetioned Jazz Reunion is Pee Wee's best latter day album - for me that honour belongs to Swingin' With Pee Wee from 1960 which pairs Pee Wee with Buck Clayton and a rhythm section headed by the impeccable Tommy Flanagan. It also benefits from the typically resonant sound achieved by Rudy van Gelder. Has been CDed but not sure of current availability. Would love to acquire the Mosaic Hampton set which must be the last word on these classic sessions but as I have to save the diminishing pile of pennies for other things I'll mend and make do with my old (1980 ?) 'complete' set on RCA Bluebird. By the way thanks for playing a couple of Bix tracks on the 77th anniversary of his premature departure - Wringin' And Twistin' and For No Reason At All In C provide a unique insight into how Bix, Tram and Lang might have played in private for their own pleasure - wonderful stuff with (in hindsight) a bittersweet nostalgia - Mike

Samantha Beastall
Dear ChrisWould you be in a position to help promote a Jazz Charity event, We have Acker Bilk, Kenny Ball, Art Theman, Ken McCarthy and Keith Ball as compare.Here in Darley Dale near Matlock on the 31st August 2008.Most kind regards Samantha 01629 733678 or enquiries@the whitworthcentre.co.uk

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Some weeks ago you played a version of "If I could be with you one hour tonight" which you said was by Coleman Hawkins. Mike Vawdrey thought that the version played came from the Jazz Reunion recording of 1961, under Pee Wee Russell's name, which featured Emmett Berry, Bob Brookmeyer, Pee Wee, Hawk, Nat Pierce, Milt Hinton and Jo Jones. I thought, and my memory might be playing me tricks that you mentioned Glenn Miller who was part of The Mound City Blue Blowers in 1929. The personnel of this recording was Glenn Miller, Pee Wee Russell, Hawk, Eddie Condon, Jack Bland, Al Morgan, Gene Krupa and Red McKenzie. I.e. Pee Wee and Hawk on both recordings.I heard it on the internet, whilst I was printing some photos, so may be barking up the wrong tree completely and if so apologise to Mike for doubting his word. Please play it again so that we know for sure.Fred.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,I have just listened to last weeks show on the internet and so have my usual comments and bits of useless information that have been in my, so called, brain for many years.Earl Hines made many recordings of Rosetta because he wrote it. When you spoke about being surprised by one of the instruments of the Gramercy Five I was there already because when I bought the 78 in the 40s it was thought of as odd to use an instrument more suited to J S Bach. Incidentally Gramercy was the name of a New York telephone exchange. In the late 30s/early 40s Eli Oberstein, who was head of RCA records, allowed Hamp to record with whoever was in NY at the time. That is why you sometimes have all Dukes men, sometimes all BGs men and so on in his recording groups. You must have noticed how Wizzin' the Wizz was very percussive. Played with just two fingers,I think, as though it was a vibraphone. All the titles were issued by French RCA and recently reissued on 5 CDs by Mosaic. This was my Christmas gift from one of my daughters this last year and so I now have them twice. I must be a nutter.You have found a new jazz drummer i.e. Dick Fatool who for many years was known to me as Nick Fatool.Buddy Greco, if it is the same one and I think it is, was Goodman's pianist and vocalist in the late 40s. Ian Bellamy is really Ballamy.That is enough rubbish for this week.Fred.

MIKE VAWDREY
RE Fred Stone's comment on One Hour - think you'll find that the version played recently was the one from Jazz Reunion - it was clearly a post 78 era recording and the rather abrupt fade was on a muted trumpet solo - Mike

David Rimmer
Hello Chris although you usually identify most tracks that you play.I've noticed that sometimes,particularly when there's been an information interruption,this seems to get lost.This happened last night with the Stan Kenton number Begin The Beguine,which is different to the recording that I've got. By the sound of it it seems like mid forties with possibly Vido Musso on tenor.Can you clarify.Other than that I enjoy the show and listen to it religiously every week.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,It is me again. I have just looked back through the message board and Mike Vawdrey's entry. The One hour played was in fact "The Mound city blue blowers" led by Red McKenzie and not Coleman Hawkins. It, like many more 78s, is still in my garage.Fred.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Just listened to the show and herewith some more useless comments and information.Duke Ellington recorded Cottontail many times but I do not know which version you played. The first tenor certainly sounded like the vapourous sound of Paul Gonsalves. There was a high trumpet which I suppose was Cat Anderson. Did I also hear Harry Carney?I still have a 78 copy of At Sundown. If you have it try Artie Shaw's version - a live swinging recording with Buddy Rich on drums.Bobby Troup not only sang Route 66 but also wrote it and was married to Julie London of Cry me a river fame. I have the LP and CD of Maxine Sullivan's Uptown although the CD is now deleted. Another one I did not take home from the shop but recently managed to buy a secondhand copy from Amazon.Out of nowhere was once announced by a BBC announcer obviously not versed in the American songbook as " and that was Stan Getz playing Out of now here"Best wishes,Fred.

Verlie
I was interested to read that someone else has problems with losing sound every few seconds. It happened to me a lot that I gave up listening. Then I was told that when these breaks happen frequently it could be a sign that the hard drive is worn or wearing out. Certainly seems to have been the case with me. Since I invested in a new pc I don't have that problem any more so now I'm back to enjoying the Jazz Show again.

Adriaan Tip
Dear Chris.Let me first say that I really appreciate your programme.As others may already have informed you, John Sangster died already a number of years ago. He was one of Humphrey Lyttelton's favorites, who played much of his work during the years. Best regards, Adriaan.

Phil Johnson
On behalf of the entertainments organiser, Mr. C. Sykes, the following event is looking for jazz acts who might be interested in jamming or gigging at the event. Mr. Sykes can be reached on home number (01782) 746738 or a message can be left for him at the office number at the end of the advert, thanks.SIX TOWNS ONE CITY CARNIVAL - STOKEWhen: Sunday, August 10th, 2008The Stoke Unity Project presents a special carnival to celebrate the City’s diversity:SIX TOWNS ONE CITYFeaturing a number of exciting acts from the styles:Reggae, Jazz, RnB, Hip Hop and Calypso.10th August 2008Hanley Park, Shelton10am onwardsFREEFor more information: Contact 01782 267888

Jan-Clare, Margate
Hello Chris - it's Friday 25th (I think - or so I hope as I am supposed to be getting a plane to Spain on Monday) Just listening to your show, BUT Can't find the play list - the site's not been updated yet!Interesting that the young lady thought Billie Holliday too fraught - so does my guitarist partner. I must say I prefer her earlier stuff when her voice was fresher. My local Asda sometimes plays one or two of hers, and some Ella, too !!!!I'm not sure I'm very keen on the chronological approach, but keep up the variety and the very helpful information on the tracks. Still a great show. Thanks.

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - re Roger's comment - yes I also remember Sparky's Magic Piano from the same source. In some quarters it's regarded as a pioneering piece of electronic music ! I actually liked it at the time. Did I read somewhere that it had influenced the Beach Boys ? (you may or may not think that was a good thing). Never personally been a big fan of Brubeck's heavy handed piano style except in the right light and on the right night - for me Truth was one of those occasions - best wishes - Mike

Roger Cairns, L.A.
Hey Chris;I remember Sparky's Magic Piano. It used be on Uncle Mac's (Derek McCulloch) Children's Favourites on Saturday mornings on the Light Programme.Probably before your time. Though I'd never have guessed that that gobbledegook was played by Dave Brubeck. Frankly, I'd take that story with a pinch of salt.

Jazzman, Down the Bricks, Dinant
Say: "TEX BEN-a-keY"Pronunciation of famous Tenor Saxophone player in Glen Miller Band (1940) on 'Little Brown Jug', etc.

Heather
Chris, just listened online to the show from 16 July, and wanted to respond to your question about Tex Beneke. The correct pronunciation (at least in the US) is BEN-uh-kee/BEN-i-kee. Keep up the great work!

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,Bob Barbard is on at Hanley Castle High School next Friday July 25th i.e. the day before the Leasowes Bank concert.Answers - Beneke is pronouced with a short short e and not ee. He took most of the tenor solos although Al Klink was a much better jazz player. Al Klink said that Glenn should have lived and the orchestra should have died i.e. too many GM orchestras about.Do you have anything by the Sauter/Finegan orchestra i.e the two great arranging talents combined. Jimmy Van Heusen is pronounced Hoosen.I saw Sue Kibbey at Upton, gave her your radio address and suggested that she send you a CD. Was that it please?Best wishes,Fred

Jem Nicholls
Please, PLEASE don't ever apologise for playing Truth by Dave Brubeck. I 'Listen Again' and that number was wonderful! The whole show was great but Truth was amazing. Complex, moody, thoughtful; it was all that and more. Thanks! Jem Nicholls, Denmead, Hampshire ('though I was born in Alsager)

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - may be wrong but the version you played of If I Could Be With You(One Hour Tonight) sounded to me like a foreshortened edit from the Pee Wee Russell/Coleman Hawkins Jazz Reunion album - full line up was Emmett Berry(tpt), Bob Brookmeyer(vlv-tbn),Russell, Hawkins, Nat Pierce(pno), Milt Hinton(sbs),Jo Jones(dms)recorded at Nola Penthouse Sound Studios, NYC on February 23, 1961. Having been a very rare LP on original Candid it's now readily available on the current revived Candid imprint and well worth seeking out - then you can play the unedited version ! Hope this helps - Mike

Roger Cairns, L.A.
Great show as always, Chris. Long time, no write, but I always listen. I really enjoyed the Aaron Copland piece. Also Bill Evans works for me at any time. And I concur with the guy asking for Ray Noble stuff. Great writer.Hope to hear more of his stuff too. Thanks Chris.

Bill
The play again of June 25th was ruined by breaks every few seconds,your technical problems or mine?

Roy Chapman
"I Only Have Eyes For You" is a popular song by composer Harry Warren and lyricist Al Dubin, written in 1934 for the film Dames where it was introduced by Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler.

Bill
Anyone know what CD(s)Johnny Hodges Band has Castle Rock and Don't blame me,I think Chris said 4CD set on his prog 2 weeks ago?thanks,Bill

Chris Savory
Just to let all you Jazz Music collectors know that on Sunday June4 29th at the Cobridge Community Centre, Stoke there is a Record & CD Fair with lots of Jazz items for sale - everything from Cassandra Wilson to Glen Miller, Mile Davis to Chris Barber, Peggy Lee to Fats Waller. 10am - 4pm

John Maynard
Hi Chris, Your anecdote regarding Glenn Miller on last week's programme promts the following. In the 70's Time-Life issued their "Swing Era" boxed sets of LPs, over 330 tracks altogether, recorded by studio bands led by either Billy May or Glen Gray. All the tracks were faithful re-creations in Hi Fi and stereo of tunes originally recorded by the great swing bands of the 30's, 40's and 50's, often featuring musicians who played on the original sessions. One such track was the Billy May recording of "Rhapsody In Blue" which you played at the beginning of the show. It was not so much the evokative sound of Billy May, though, but of Glenn Miller, arranged by Bill Finegan. The original 1942 recording by Miller had Billy May in the trumpet section, and the muted trumpet solo on both recordings was by John Best.No, I hadn't heard of him either. Listen to any of these recordings along with the originals and anyone would be hard pressed to say which was which. Best Wishes, John.

Fred Stone
I liked the two Geoff Eales tracks. I know Geoff from seeing him play, and speaking to him, on many occasions and used to sell his CDs. He often accompanied Marlene VerPlanck when she sang in Broadway and did a wonderful job of reading Billy's accompaniments for his wife, for Billy rarely left a bar unfilled. Of course Geoff has accompanied people such as Jose Carreras and Kiri Te Kanawa amongst others. Having seen Geoff play you will appreciate this story. Geoff was doing a classical recital and the page turner was instructed to turn the page when Geoff nodded his head. She must have gone frantic knowing which nod meant turn.Fred

Annie Page
I listen from London on Listen Again (throughout the week!) and never fail to enjoy your show. Thank you for bringing such good jazz to the radio waves and for educating me further in the greatest music genre. Annie.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,You asked about "killer diller" and probably dozens have told you what it means. In case they have not the term applies to arrangements, usually for big bands, at fast tempos which were played to excite people. Lots of brass riffs, and not the sort of music that appealed to the heart.Goodman, Miller etc all played them.I enjoyed Mildred Bailey a singer I love as the 14 CDs I have testify. She was the sister of Al Rinker one of the Rhythm Boys with Paul Whitemans band the others being Bing Crosby and Harry Barris. She was the wife, at one time, of Red Norvo and they were known as Mr and Mrs Swing. Try the wonderful arrangements by Eddie Sauter with Red Norvo's wonderful orchestra - vintage 36 onwards or some of the Mosaic 10 CD set with all the late 20s/30s players on them. Wonderful stuff and sound good today.Enjoyed all the Basie items, which I have known for years, but always worth hearing again. Do you have the "Dance Sessions"? If so would love to hear some of those again.Also do you have "Sweets at the Haig" please?Best wishes,Fred.

MIKE VAWDREY
Jazz nicknames - although not so common now - were once widespread. Off the top of my head :-Johnny Hodges - Rab or Rabbit(his liking for salads ?)Ben Webster - Frog or The BruteBilly Strayhorn - Swee'Pea or Weeley(?)Harry Edison - SweetsRoy Eldridge - Little JazzRay Nance -FloorshowSarah Vaughan - SassyFletcher Henderson - SmackSome kind of prize for the weirdest must go to a blues pianist of 'ancient age' (he died in 1957) James 'Bat The Humming Bird' Robinson !! The practice seems to have become much less widespread from the '50s on - an indication of the music taking itself more seriously maybe ? But how much difference in function or intent is there with the adopted names of rappers for example ? Another aspect of this whole area is the many jazz musicians who converted to Islam especially in the '40s/'50s and took on Islamic names.By the way a very obvious entry in the horn playing brothers stakes would be Stanley and Tommy Turrentine. If you broaden out the sibling bit to include any instrument you may come up with quite a few more - Lester and Lee Young,Ray and Tommy Bryant,the Montgomery Bros, the Marsalis clan (also works on the horn players as well,in fact given the extended family more than once)- which also leads to Fathers And Sons/Daughters - enough of all this - best wishes - Mike

Ted Theiss
A piece I've never been able to find over many years is Ray Nobles, "Turkish Delight" Would really like you to play it if you can. Thanks.

John Maynard
Hi Chris, like you I'd never heard of Herman Chittison before, but the track you played sounded more like "Lover". A Quick Google confirmed that "Frasquita Serenade" and "Lover" are on the same CD. Perhaps you could play "Frasquita Serenade" next week. Keep finding more Obscure Greats. Best Wishes.

Fred Stone
Enjoyed your Herman Chittison who Jack Teagarden reckoned to be one of the greatest pianists ever and loved the way he quoted Lover throughout Frasquita Serenade. The quote to end all quotes!!!Fred

Martin Blamey
Hi Chris,I'm a listener from Cowbridge, South Wales. Just caught up with your latest show which I listen to 'on-line' via the 'listen-again' feaure. You mentioned your visit to a local school where you struggled to think of some jazz 'nikc-names'. Next time, how about mentioning 'Bleeding Gums Murphy' from the Simpsons!!!I'm sure the kids may have heard of him!! Enjoy your show immensely especially since Radio 2 have failed to fill the gap left by HL's 'Best of Jazz'. Shame! Kind regards

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - re last night's programmme : -(1) the Goldkette unit you played was really McKinney's Cotton Pickers - the real Goldkette orchestra of the day couldn't make it because their bus had broken down en route to Chicago. Accordeonist Harold Stokes was the only actual band member to make the session because he'd had the foresight to travel in his own car ! Trombonist Claude Jones was quite well known in his time and worked among others with Fletcher Henderson, Cab Calloway, Chick Webb and Duke Ellington. He spent the last 10 years of his life as an Officers Mess Steward on SS United States and actually died at sea in January '62. RE Goldkette could you dig out Clementine (From New Orleans) the greatest side recorded by the Bix/Tram etc edition of the orchestra ? (2)I've always asssumed Peggy Lees's I'm a Woman to be an 'answer' song to Muddy Waters' I'm A Man. Correct ? By the way Anna might like to check the mid '90s adaptation of some of The Saint stories currently being rerun on BBC7. This is heavily laced with well chosen examples of hot dance music from the '20s/early '30s from which I recognised among others Goldkette, Ellington and - yes indeed ! - Annette Hanshaw - best wishes - Mike

Fred Stone,
Dear Chris,Many years ago someone copied for me an LP entitled "Norma Doloris Egstrom from Jamestown, North Dakota". This I had for years but never found the LP until I managed to purchase two, yes two secondhand LPs for the shop. One I kept and the other being very rare I sold for £10.00. It was rare because, naturally, no one knew who the lady was and it never sold so yes I knew the name. Her father was a Swedish immigrant hence the name. The tracks were reissued on CD some time ago in the Two on One EMI series with the help of Ray Purslow of the Record Centre in Birmingham.Gene Harris has been a favourite of mine for many years and was, some years ago, booked to appear at Huntingdon Hall in Worcester but died before he could get there. Not really playing the game was he!!Dizzy and Sonny Stitt also did the same before I could see them in Birmingham but I had seen Diz many years before.With reference to to Gilad Atzmon I recall Gerry Mulligan once tellling us that the group were going to play a piece based on the chords of a well known tune. The piece played was "Bike up the Strand" -you know the tune title.Best wishes and thankyou for your email.Fred.

colin dunhill
herb geller born 2nd nov 1928

Pete Cargill
Forgot to add thanks for Charlie Parker on 'Summertime' even if the end was cut. Perhaps you could play it in full sometime, please.

Pete Cargill
Chris, thanks for Miles on 'Oleo'. Jazzbeat gets better every week with surprises cropping up all the time. Still hoping for Illinois Jacquet's Black Velvet.

Catherine
Chris, Many thanks for week after week of great jazz. The line ups are always intriguing and you have a great way of leading us all along from the old to the unexpected. I "listen again" in the office and on my travels across Africa, it keeps me happily working and humming, regardless of the circumstances, thanks!

Verlie
Not too happy listening online now as 1) it comes across faint whereas other music stations don't;2) there are too many breaks in the sound. Really spoils my enjoyment. Can something be done?

Jason Walters
loved that track by Jucamaya !

Anna
Wow! I found this station doing a word search for Tiny Parham and lo and behold - he's playing on the BBC! I hadn't come across a mainstream radio station that played such good, albeit obscure, old jazz before. I'll certainly listen again for more 1920s music as good as this. Any early Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Henry Allen (dare I say Annette Hanshaw?) and the like would be heaven!I first learned about all this great music through a US-based show broadcasting out of a college radio station and online called Radiola, which I would recommend to anyone who likes this kind of music, and I'm so happy to see something along similar lines over here.ThanksAnna

Jack Perkins
I try to listen to you every week. Here in Tokyo, that means I really look forward to Thursday when the new show airs on the BBC. I'm an American and have livesd in Tokyo for a number of years. My parents brought me up on jazz and it's a real pleasure listening to your program. My father was a newscaster/DJ and my mother was a singer who once sang with the Ink Spots (a one off spot). As a fair blond woman, she was noticed. At any rate, I love your show. Great selection of music. From Japan and America, THANKS!!!!Jack PerkinsTokai UniversityHirastuka, Japan

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - re last week's Joni Mitchell Porkpie Hat - have had her Mingus album for a loig time - a truly fascinating piece of work and a real exclamation mark at the very end of the Mingus discography.A beautifully crafted lyric to boot. It strikes me that much of Joni's 1970s output is markedly jazz inflected - she seems to have much more genuine jazz feeling than many of the crowded company of current singers who describe themselves as jazz - best wishes - Mike

Mike Dutton
Sitting here marking books, nice to heard the show but at least 6/7 breaks in the sound... not one for complaining just letting you know. Great music. Keep it up Chris. Still looking for that 'Prelude to a Kiss'!

Fred Stone
Dear Chris, Another very enjoyable show with music that, generally, found favour with my eclectic tastes. I did enjoy your contradicting yourself by say that "Fats" Waller was "inimitable" and "much copied". Only one of those can be correct. I seem to have not made myself clear earlier - Little Witley Village Hall which is north or Worcester - stages only Traditional/New Orleans jazz for Vernon tells me that people like Scott Hamilton play ooblie, ooblie music but he and I agree to differ. Gupshill Manor nr Tewkesbury has a big band session on the last Sunday of every month. Best wishes, Fred.

jan buijsse
Dear Chris, a marvellous show this week with a variety of music. One of the best these last weeks. And no traffic-jams! Greetings, Jan

Pete Cargill
If like me you liked Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie playing Leap Frog from last week's Jazzbeat enter 'Jazz Dispute' on YouTube. A real treat! Thoroughly enjoying the show Chris, still miss Mel but I like your style. More bebop, please, Fats Navarro perhaps?

Peter Buckley
Had to switch off Jazzbeat tonight due to an overdose of pop/rock music, surely I can't be alone in feeling this way? Pete

john powell
Hi ChrisI'm one of your internet listeners and I'd like to say that the jazz mixture which you play is just what the doctor ordered. If you're looking for female vocalists have you heard Helen Merrill? She's getting on a bit now but she never seems to have achieved the fame or fortune she deserves.Best wishes.

Roy Chapman
Thanks to John Maynard re Kenton's A.T.T.Y.A. I guess it'll sound a lot better than when I heard it on a 78rpm on a wind-up gramaphone way back in 1955!!

John Maynard
Hi ChrisFor full details of the Kenton Version of "All The things You Are" look no further than Radio 3's Jazz Records Request playlist for 19 May 2007. This is an ear splitting version featuring my namesake, recorded in 1950 and taken from the album "Stan Kenton's Innovations Orchestra" 1997 CD No. EBCD21312. Oh, and by the way it's "East Saint Louis Toodle-oo" NOT "East Street..". This week's Deliberate Mistake?

Roger Cairns, L.A.
HI Chris, Another late comment on the Boxing Day 'All The Things You Are' programme. Fabulous! You should take the concept to Radio 3. Perhaps a shortened, one hour version of the show featuring a different tune every week. I feel sure that nationally, it would become hugely popular. But please don't stop doing all the other stuff too.

Jan-Clare
Thanks Chris for playing Stephane with Martin Taylor the other week and for your kind remarks. Thoroughly enjoyed the Christmas programme - not the College lecture I feared!!! And nice to have a guest. I am looking forward to seeing the playlist for the evening - can you give someone a nudge, please? Thanks, J-C

Fred Stone,
Dear Chris,It's me again. In this show we had the news and the traffic situation which were always cut out of previous programmes so something has gone wrong this week.I do not think that your internet listeners in Malaya, America or elsewhere in the world are very interested in the traffic siuation in Staffordshire.Fred.

jazzfan@ntlworld.com
Can we please have the play list for Boxing Day for all the "All The things You Are" items played.Thanks

Fred Stone.
Dear Chris,Thank you for sending Rick Vaughan our best wishes. Two points from what I have heard, so far, this week. You played a track with Wingy Manone who, I hope you know, was so called because he only had one arm. You also played a track by Joe Venuti who was a great practical joke and once sent Wingy one cuff link.You also played a track by the wonderful Jeannie Bryson who has five Cds in my collection. She is the daughter of Connie Bryson a great songwriter and, so everyone says, Dizzy Gillespie. American musicians I know swear this is so. Best wishes,Fred.

Tamara Colver, Argentina
Hi Chris - just discovered you on the amazing net! While we swelter in nearly 40 degrees here in Cordoba, Argentina, you guys are freezing (according to the news bulletin which so annoyingly interrupted the marvellous rendition of Honeysuckle Rose by Jeanie Bryson - thought that kind of thing only happened here ...!)Like your style - will be listening in from now on!

Bill
playlist for 2 Jan please?

MIKE VAWDREY
A very late response to the All the Things You Are show. The Tony Martin version was interesting from the viewpoint of Kern himself being at the piano but I certainly would be in no hurry to hear it again. I found Jan-Clare's comments interesting and perceptive although I have to say that nobody will persuade me that Stephane Grapelli's ballad playing is anything other than schmaltzy whatever technique he may have used ! Re the Sonny Meets Hawk version - on this date I think both men resolutely did their own thing - if there was a contest it was a draw. It's a tribute to Hawk that the then 58 year old was ready and able to meet the younger man on his own ground. Erik Nisenson's Rollins book Open Sky includes informative comments about this session from the man himself. Finally, in your list of potential interpretations you failed to include Bud Powell who played the tune frequently with the Bird Of Paradise tag included - even his later recordings of this are worth hearing. All the best for 2008 - MikeP.S. Didn't the Kern family try to get Dizzy Gillespie's set of his songs banned ? - how times change..

John Maynard
Dear Chris, I have often thought that a programme based around one tune would make interesting listening. As far as I know you are the first presenter to do this - it made great listening. But prepare to be very surprised. The Ella version of "All The Things You Are" was indeed from the Kern Songbook album, but Basie with strings?! The big band was in fact the Nelson Riddle Orchestra. How about a Deliberate Mistake each week with the answer at the end of the show.

Fred Stone
Dear Chris,I see that "you should be ashamed of yourself" for not being old enough to know all the artists. How dare you not know Margaret Whiting.This is not a serious comment.I just want to say how much I enjoyed "All the things you are" but the last singer would not get very far in the entertainment business - well not as a singer. Chris Coleman also had some very interesting things to say.Best wishes for 2008.Fred.

Jamie Brownfield
Great show on boxing day - Nice to hear some be-bop!!!(Some people are very stuck in their ways)and also enjoyed all the differeces, thanks - :)

JBS
Playlist for 26th Dec Please

David Rimmer
Dear ChrisThanks for a great show last night 26th Dec.One small point however if Pat Metheny had been on the Gary Burton track he most certainly would have qualified as a child prodigy being roughly six and a half at the time.The group in question was under the leadership of a C&W guitarist called Hank Garland who was at the time probably the No1 session guitarist in Nashville.As well as that he also had a great feeling for jazz,and as well as playing in N.Y. from time to time was scheduled to appear at the 1960 Newport Jazz Fesival with a Nashville based group.However due to the riots that year that appearance was aborted.The session from which the All The Things..track was taken was from a session recorded the following year with a seventeen year old Gary Burton together with Joe Benjamin bass and Joe Morello drums.Tragically just a few months later Hank was seriously hurt in a car accident and was unable to play the guitar for probably a couple of decades or more.He eventually did manage to play again but at nothing like the amazing virtuosity as displayed on that track and indeed on the whole of the album in question Jazz Winds From A New Direction.It might be worth hearing a bit more from it in future programmes!

Roy Chapman
Hi Chris,Great Boxing Day show. Listening now on the web, having retired from working in the West Midlands, Radio Shropshire is out of reach down here in Surrey! Had a premonition that you'd end with Peter Sellers, but didn't catch the Stan Kenton version with Maynard Ferguson, I heard it back in the 50's on 78rpm, maybe it never made vinyl or CD? Best Wishes for 2008–long may your programme continue.

Fred Stone.
Dear Chris,I do admire the way that you are not afraid to admit to not knowing people that I have known, and had records of for some 50 to 60 years. Much better to be honest and not to pretend.I will look forward to the "All the things you are" show although of course we cannot get it now that our programmes have been "refreshed" with another chart show. Thank goodness for the web.Margaret Whiting's father was Richard Whiting who wrote "Hooray for Hollywood" and "My ideal" amongst other things. p up Incidentally the John Green who accompanied Fred Astaire was, I think, Johnny Green of "Body and soul" and "I water the front cover" (joke) fame.Keep up the good work it is much appreciated.Best wishes,Fred

Roger Cairns, L.A.
Chris, I'm shocked! You haven't heard of Margaret Whiting? She worked with Johnny Mercer in the 40s and had hits with 'That Old Black Magic' and 'Moonlight In Vermont' among others. Her dad was Richard Whiting who wrote films scores, and such memorable items as 'Hooray For Hollywood', 'Too Marvelous For Words' and 'The Good Ship Lollypop'! As far as I know Margaret is still with us and will now be in her 80s.I guess you're not into lady singers too much, Chris. In which case can I suggest a few favorites of mine you might want to check out. There's Jerry Southern, Helen Merrill, Julie London, June Christy and a contemporary candidate would be Karrin Allyson. I feel sure you're familiar with Shirley Horn who, for me, almost represents royalty in the world of lady singer/pianists.Great show, Chris, as usual.All the best.

jan bs
Dear Chris, thank you for your wonderful show. I listen 2 or 3 times a week on line. In your latest show you played Metal fatique. Is a track from Miles Davis' Bitches Brew a good suggestion? Kind regards from Jan Buijsse

Kai Thurfors
Nice going, Chris, you semms to have found your stride now! But there seems to be a technical error in the latest show (Dec. 6). The show gets silent after almost an hour, at least at my end (at the finish of If you are going to the city). Thanks and regards / Kai

Jan-Clare
Petite Fleur may have been recorded with the charts in mind but it was done by a jazz band and certainly enticed a number of people into listening to more jazz - me included. One of the problems with making recordings of jazz (which is inherently improvisational) is that the version gets set in concrete (sorry, vinyl) and becomes what people expect to hear especially when it becomes so popular. I don't think that aiming it at the popular market makes it any the less "jazz" unless you are setting rigid definitions that say if it is hugely popular it isn't jazz. The boundaries between different types of music are never as clear-cut as some people would like them to be because they are played by individuals who have had many different experiences and heard many different sounds which all contribute to their performances. And long may things continue that way. Pigeon-holes don't only get used by pigeons!And please Chris could you play something by Stephane Grapelli and Martin Taylor - I saw them a number of years ago in Cambridge and was so impressed by the combination of youth and experience - the vitality was tangible.Keep up the good work and keep learning! Best wishes. JC

Jan-Clare
Help - Humph's bongos faded away and the volume just didn't come back! Please let us hear the rest of the programme!!!!! It's too good to miss. Thanks Chris.

John Maynard
Hi Chris, Not your fault I know, but is anyone on the production team aware that after some 50 minutes or so into this week's recording we lost the on line connection, and were only re-connected some 20 minutes later at much reduced volume. Can this be sorted before next week's show?You've been receiving some good natured stick recently regarding your lack of knowledge of the likes of John Kirby and Lou Watters. It must be a generational thing. For many years my tastes were the likes of King Oliver and Nat Gonella, Johnny Hodges and Dizzy, Errol Garner and Jimmy Smith, but I switched off round about the early 60,s after those such as Miles and Sonny Rollins. It is only recently that I have discovered veterans such as John Surman and Joe Zawinul!

Verlie
I was so enjoying listening to Wednesday's show online when, for some unknown reason, the sound went very faint after an hour. My speakers tested ok so what went wrong?Can you mend it please, the music was excellent.

JBS
What happened to the volume from the end of 'If You're Going To The City'to the end of 'My Funny Valentine'?

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - re Malcolm's comment about Petite Fleur - what is or isn't jazz is always a difficult area and much of the time it's in the ear of the behearer. I still have the 45 single of Petite Fleur which my father bought at the time and I've always liked it. If it isn't jazz what is it ? By the the by delighted you were able to come up with the real Hello Lola. As a sometime practitioner myself I would spring to the defence of Red McKenzie who got some great sounds from his comb and paper. How about now treating us to One Hour(the other side) - an important early ballad performance. Even better could you look out the Russell/Hawkins Jazz Reunion which brought the two together again in very interesting company(Emmett Berry, Bob Brookmeyer and Nat Pierce among others). As mentioned still around on Candid if the BBC Library can't oblige. For your Weird and Wonderful slot a taste of the only recorded encounter between Pee Wee and Thelonious Monk (Newport '63 - currently on At Newport 1963/1965, Columbia Legacy)would be worth a shot ! - best wishes - Mike P.S. Great to hear The Singers Unlimited Fool On The Hill - I have several of their outstanding albums with instrumental backing but none of the a capella stuff

Malcolm B Wallace
Chris, You mentioned that the Chris Barber/Monte Sunshine track Petit Fleur may not be strictly "jazz". My view is that it was recorded with the Top Ten charts in mind. Interestingly, I believe it was recorded at the wrong speed at the wrong key because the original Bechet record version was played by the band at the wrong speed. Excellent music - don't change the format

Paul Sherlock
Hi ChrisJust heard you play and comment on the John Kirby Sextet's Royal Garden Blues. Sorry to correct you, but although John Kirby may have started out on tuba, he spent most, if not all, of his career playing Double Bass! You also on reading out the personnel unfortunately listed O'Neil Spencer as the Bass player!! He was in fact the drummer. Also, when playing A Lu Watter's track and admitting you'd never heard of him before, proceeded to give some sort of potted history, totally failing to mention that his place in Jazz History is firmly established because he almost single-handledly created the Revival in Traditional Jazz when he formed the Yerba Buena Jazz Band in 1939. As your knowledge of Jazz History seems a trifle shaky Chris, it might be worth double checking the facts before making such elementary mistakes.Otherwise....love the music. Keep up the good work.Paul

James LeGros
Chris - The 2nd pianist on the Bill Evans recording you played towards the end of your show is Bill himself - Doing a "re-recording" performance - Good show - Thanks JKL (from Paris)

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - didn't realise you'd been on the other side of the planet so apologies for what must have seemed like a deluge of comments. Have to admit that I'm not a great fan of Bill Evans but is it possible that Bemsha Swing originated from Conversations With Myself, hence the other pianist was Bill Evans # 2 ? - best wishes - Mike

Bill Lee
where has the track list gone? It used to be on the jazz show page after the blurb about Chris. Come on guys stop moving things!
WebMaster replies
Sorry Bill. There's now a new self-contained playlist page where you'll find the current and past programmes tracks. It's part of the jazz index. We shouldn't be moving anything else now!

Sanjeev Naik
Mel Hill's show is no more? Somehow other things in life took over and I came back to the BBC website today after a few months to listen to what great stuff Mel had put together for us this week and lo....the show is no more.I will sorely miss Mel's refreshing choice of great jazz pieces from the past. Wish you the best, Mel...for providing us all - far and wide across the globe, thanks to BBC Radio online - with great joy and happiness over the years. Wish you a very enjoyable and pleasurable retirement. And play on... enjoy your trumpeting!

Mike Trimmer
Chris, your announcements are twice as loud as the music, can someone sort it out. This is when listening to the repeat of 15th Nov.

Steve Powell
So sad to loose your show.I was challenged,excited and surprised, never failing to enjoy the music or your comments. Your personal insights warmed the airwaves.A massive achievement.Thankyou,goodby and farewell.

Steve Powell
So sad to loose your show. I was challenged, excited and surprised, never failing to enjoy the music or your comments. Your personal insights warmed the airwaves. A massive achievement. Thankyou, goodbye and farewell.

Mike Dutton
Hi Chris, Sounds like all going well. Did you get my text re: 'The Roar of 74? Honest haven't seen it after leaving Bankfield. Any chance of Prelude to a Kiss'? Keep up the good work. M

John Reed
You've disappeared totally from the Listen Again pages - not on Radio Stoke or listed under Jazz anywhere. The only one I can find is from 17th October.
WebMaster replies
Sincere apologies John, the recent, apparently simple, changes to the programme name caused lots of linked systems within Listen Again to collapse. We've been working to rebuild these links and make Jazzbeat easy to find once again. All will back to normal soon. Promise! Please stick with us...

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - apologies for being pedantic but the Hello Lola you played wasn't that delightful person I'm afraid - slightly dissapointed as it's been a personal favourite since I junkshopped it on an HMV 78 back in the late '60s(the last period when you could still do such things I think). It sounded to me like a Fletcher Henderson version of Sugar Foot Stomp. Any chance you could track down the real Lola ? By the way Messers Hawkins and Russell were reunited on record almost 32 years later on Jazz Reunion (Candid) - now I guess back in circulation on the revived Candid label - best wishes - Mike

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - re tonight's show - (1) I have those Carmen McRae tracks on a mid '70s Groove Merchant double (Velvet Soul) according to the sleeve of which the unidentified pianist is somebody called Dick Shreve. I think it was recorded around '72. (2) the Gerry Mulligan tracks you played were in fact recorded in NYC although Mulligan's recording activities around the turn of the '60s were divided between NYC and LA . I'm not sure where he was actually based at the time. The 1960 edition of The Encyclopedia Of Jazz gives his address c/o his agent in NYC for what it's worth !!(3) May have just been me but the Herb Geller you played sounded a lot like Laura ??Apologies for being pedantic, keep up the good work - Mike

Roger Cairns, L.A.
Hi Chris,Thank you for another great show. Your musical background was obviously a perfect grounding for the entertaining and educational programme you’re regularly presenting. Great stuff.I'm already looking forward to next week's broadcast.

catherine in Lesotho
Hello Chris, beautiful show every week, thank you. As with Mel's show I am listening again several times a week while on the road. Great idea to sometimes focus on various versions of just one song. The late great Jerry "The Bama" Washington did this periodically on his radio show on WPFW (Washington DC) and it was an amazing education for listeners over the years.

Tony Perera Marietta Georgia US
Dear Mel, I had the feeling that you and Ole Man River had the ability to roll along forever! I was sadly mistaken and missed your last few shows due to inter-continental travel in the last two months. Suffice now to say that I wish you the very best in your retirement from the Mell Hill Show and convey to you a deep appreciation and thanks for the great jazz music you played for us over the years. Be well and God;s Blessings on you, always.

John Tempest
Chris - Many thanks for the last few programs. Understand you are a baritone sax player (amongst other Saxes). Good to hear the bari on the Gerry Mulligan concert band and also Charlie Foulkes on the Basie rendering. It appears to me American arrangers highlight the bari as the ensemble section work seem to have much greater intervals than UK arrangers. Just to confound you I was a semi pro trumpet player so have no right to be making such comments!!! Good fortune to the prog - I will be listening whenever possible. John Tempest

Fred Stone
Dear Chris, Having had the CD "Two Of A Mind" for many years I enjoyed what you played last week for three reasons. They are that two of my favourite saxophone players are Gerry and Paul and I think that "All The Things You Are" is the best tunes ever written. As for your thought that you might do a programmes with just one tune I can tell you that the Lord CD ROM Discography lists 1030 versions of The Kern tune so you have plenty to go for. Try Serge Chaloff from the CD Blue Serge for starters. Fred Stone.

Steve Hasbury
Love the show. I miss Mel, but Chris is doing a great job. Glad the messageboard is still running. Have you ever seen/heard a recording of Pee Wee Russell's `Pee Wee's Tune'? Steve Hasbury, Kincardine, Ontario, Canada

Richard Hilton
Hi Chris, First of all... great show. I am an avid listener in Telford, but for the previous two weeks the shows transmission on FM via Radio Shropshire has been awful with big fluctuations in volume and one channel dropping out altogether. I have contacted Radio Shropshire

Jason Platt
Mel, I certainly miss your show. I had always loved jazz, yet never knew enough about it to get a good grasp. Listening to your show made me reach out and embrace it even more than ever. You're show was triumph, I doubt any show will even come close.Jason PlattMoline IL (BIXland USA)

Fred Stone.
Dear Chris,I listened to your show for the first time yesterday having been absent on holiday since Mel left. I very much enjoyed your presentation and although Mel was a friend having been a customer when I had my shop and as the recipient of many loaned CDs it was wonderful that each sentence didn't start with er, uhm,erm etc. That used to drive my wife crazy. Should you want to borrow any CDs, either of well known or unknown artists, I am always willling to oblige. In fact you may well get some whether you ask or not if that is OK.Also, having a copy of Tim Lord's CD ROM discography I could help with personnels if ever you need it. Just ring me on 01905 820733.Fred Stone.

MIKE VAWDREY
Chris - a belated thanks for playing a track from the new Maria Schneider album. While building on the legacy of Gil Evans and possibly Bob Brookmeyer(as an arranger) she's certainly one of those people who is moving the music into slightly different areas. The reflective/contemplative aspects she explores can be a welcome change from the high energy which can sometimes predominate in jazz. Wonderful stuff .. Did you mention that this can only be obtained direct from her web site ?

Pat Elms
I listen to your great show, regret the departure of Mel, and wish Chris every success with a so far promising beginning.However, coiuld you please look at a problem which occurs with both Mel and your transmission.Your voice level is far greater than the music level, so I set the sound to hear the music, and am then blown off my seat by your vocal input.Good luck

Dan Nicholls
I like the chronological/trad-swing-bop-etc approach, would be interested to see where it would go if you had another hour! Does stoke have much of an avant-garde scene?! Also it would be nice to have some Gumbles Jazz Club listings on this page...

Jan-Clare
Thanks, Chris, for the Stephane/Django Charleston - I've not heard this one before - just goes to prove that even the old stuff can be new, too! Smashing to hear Putting On The Ritz, too. You are definitely on my Not To Be Missed programmes. Can someone prod central BBC to get you listed on the radio player's list of jazz programmes? A serious omission on their part.

Verlie Battenti
Great music, Chris. Two tracks into this week's show and I'm dancing about all over the place! My mother taught me to do the Charleston PROPERLY so it's one dance I just cannot resist. Good going.

Bryan Stokes
On using the 'listen again' facility there seems to be a marked difference in the volume of the commentary and that of the music. Chris appears to be close to the mike but the music seems to come from the next room. Can this be rectified please. Thanks.

Bill Gayler
Hallo ChrisFurther to my earlier e-mail regarindg Jazz vocalists ,you may have gathered that my preference is for the cool school of singing.In which event it was remiss of me to leave out 2 high priestesses of that genre...Anita O'Day & Chris Connor...but hope that you will be able to find room for both in future showsRegards Bill Gayler Surbiton. Surrey

Bill Gayler
Hallo Chris,First congratulations on a smooth takeover from the esteemed Mel Hill.Next,in your 2nd show you mentioned that you had been underexposed to jazz vocalists.If it is your intention to feature vocalists in future programmes any chance of some tracks from the likes of Meredith D'Ambrosio,Annie Ross (as a soloist),Irene Kral,Jeri Southern,Karin Krog,June Christy,Shiela Jordan etc etc...& perhaps some more Julie London.RegardsBill GaylerSurbiton Surrey

catherine in Washington, DC
Hello Chris and thanks for you smooth segue - a great job and so glad you landed in this seat. Tonight's show was lovely, especially enjoyed that version of "In a Sentimental Mood".

Steve Brown,Coleford,Forest of Dean
Chris,Looking forward to you continuing in the Mel Hill tradition with your own outlook on the Jazz scene.I hope you are not going to neglect publishing the weekly playlist on the web (a reference to the lack of playlist for 12/09/07!).

Niall in Northern Italy
The King is retired. Long live the King! Excellent first show Chris, very enjoyable. I will certainly continue to tune in (via internet) to your show as regularly (i.e. at least once a day!) as I did to Mel's.

Jan-Clare
Firstly, Happy Retirement, Mel - hope you find it as full and fulfilling as I have the first few years of mine. Secondly, thank you for helping find your replacement - what an impressive CV! Thanks Chris for your first programme - you also managed to fit in a broad spectrum of styles and artists, and I look forward to getting used to the "new" voice. Yes please to more clarinet and maybe more guitar too. Best wishes for future shows.

MIKE VAWDREY
Re Sandhya's query relating to Jazz On A Summers Day - I'm pretty certain you can now get a combined CD/DVD , the latter with the complete film. Haven't checked but I think the label may be Charly(UK). Chris - thanks for your initial offering - could I suggest some kind of tribute to the recently departed and enormously influential Joe Zawinul in the near future? He was one of the people who moved the music into new areas (at the time) and displayed incredible prescience through most of his career. A personal favourite is his 1970 Zawinul album(Atlantic) - similar trance-like mood to In A Silent way....

Roger Cairns, L.A.
Hi Chris,Greatly enjoyed the show. Congrats on taking over from Mel; big boots to fill but I think the powers that be are pretty smart finding you. Enjoyed the variety you played, including some of the intriguing stuff like the clarinet feature, the Jeff Keezer/Claire Martin number, the Seven Dreams track by Jan Garbarek as well as the wonderful selection of classics from many of the 'greats'. Greatly looking forward to next week.All the best.

Richard
Well done Chris. Nice first programme. Good to hear your brummy tones coming over the air waves

Richard Ellingsworth, Warminster
Still the best Jazz programme anywhere on the radio! Particularly nice to hear Jan Gabarek being given some air time.

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