Dan Roan

BBC sports editor

The biggest stories dissected

About Dan

The BBC's sports editor, Dan covers both major events and... Read more about Dan Roan news stories, especially on TV news output.

He's reported from football's World Cup in South Africa, the Rugby World Cup in New Zealand, the 2012 Euro finals in Poland and Ukraine, and the London Olympics.

Dan led the BBC's news coverage of the controversial Bahrain F1 Grand Prix, and the John Terry trial, breaking the news of Terry's retirement from international football.

With an interest in the politics and business of sport, Dan has also presented Radio 5 live's Sportsweek programme, and fronted a special BBC1 documentary on Brazil's preparations ahead of the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics.

Previously Dan was both a politics and finance journalist at the BBC before becoming chief news reporter at Sky Sports News.

Coe must salvage athletics' credibility

Read full article on Athletics doping scandal: Lord Coe must salvage credibility

As the man responsible for organising London 2012, Lord Coe is used to chairing important meetings.

But when he hosts an IAAF council conference call on Friday evening at a secret location in London, he will be aware that not only is his reputation on the line, but that of his sport.

Was this the best Rugby World Cup ever?

Read full article on Rugby World Cup 2015: The biggest and best ever?

Ask rugby's most powerful figure where the 2015 World Cup will rank and he sees no reason to be diplomatic.

"The biggest and the best of all time" Brett Gosper tells me confidently, at the plush Kensington hotel where the sport's leading administrators have set up camp ahead of the climax to the game's showpiece event.

Concern over Salman presidency bid

Read full article on Fifa: 'Deep concern' over Sheikh Salman presidency bid

The controversy surrounding the possible candidacy of Sheikh Salman for the Fifa presidency has intensified with the International Trade Union Confederation expressing "deep concern" over the Asian football chief.

Salman has been accused by Bahraini human rights groups of complicity in the detention and torture of footballers and other athletes in a crackdown launched by the Arab kingdom's rulers following pro-democracy protests in 2011.

Why fan price protests will persist

Read full article on Price of Football: Why fan protests will persist despite price freezes

The BBC's fifth Price of Football survey will come as encouraging news to the many fans who have grown used to the price of their loyalty consistently rising.

The fact the cost of watching football in Britain has mostly remained the same or even become cheaper, suggests pressure from supporters and government has finally had an impact after the ticket price inflation of recent seasons, along with clubs becoming more prepared to pass on more of their ever-increasing broadcast rights revenues to their customers.

Is this the tipping point for Fifa?

Read full article on Fifa: Sepp Blatter & Michel Platini banned - is this the tipping point?

Kicked out of the game he had ruled for so long, Sepp Blatter's departure from Fifa along with that of the next most powerful man in the sport - likely successor and Uefa chief Michel Platini - seemed like a defining moment.

After so many years of corruption, and with so many of those at the top of the sport disgraced, banned or under investigation, a void now exists at the top of world football.

F1 hard to watch - Bianchi's father

Read full article on Jules Bianchi crash: Formula 1 'too difficult' to watch, says father

The father of late Formula 1 star Jules Bianchi has said it is still "too difficult" to watch the sport, as the one-year anniversary of his son's fatal crash at the 2014 Japanese Grand Prix approaches.

In an exclusive interview, Philippe Bianchi told BBC Sport: "Perhaps in a few months, a few years, I can see again a grand prix, I don't know, but for the moment, it is too difficult."

Blood doping: Can Coe fix athletics?

Read full article on Blood doping: Is fixing athletics Lord Coe's greatest challenge?

Two weeks before its flagship event - the World Championships in Beijing - and with its credibility and integrity under scrutiny like never before, it is no surprise that athletics' governing body the IAAF has come out all guns blazing as it attempts to handle the drugs crisis that threatens to bring the sport to its knees. But what questions remain to be answered?

There is little doubt it feels athletics is getting a raw deal as a result of the publication of allegations by German broadcaster ARD and the Sunday Times that it effectively turned a blind eye to rampant cheating and suspicious blood tests involving hundreds of athletes - allegations the IAAF calls "sensationalist and confusing".