Sochi 2014: James Woods misses out on slopestyle medal for Britain

James Woods missed out on Great Britain's second freestyle medal of the Sochi Winter Olympics as he finished fifth in the ski slopestyle event.

The 22-year-old, competing with a hip injury which prevented him from trying more difficult tricks, recorded his best score of 86.60 in his first run.

The United States did the 1-2-3, with Joss Christensen's 95.80 taking gold.

London-born Gus Kenworthy (93.60) and X Games winner Nick Goepper (92.40) won silver and bronze respectively.

Analysis

"The rail section was immaculate. Because of his hip injury, James Woods will be very happy with fifth."

Christensen, who had never before won a top-class event, had qualified in first position and maintained his imperious form with a near-perfect run in a very high-scoring final.

Woods, who won the World Cup title last year, had qualified in third position but was skiing in pain and the fifth-place finish was admirable in the circumstances.

The Sheffield skier said: "I am incredibly proud to be here. It is always a bit disappointing when you do not perform to your best, but it was an immense final."

He admitted he would not have competed had it not been an Olympic Games.

"I can do triples [in normal circumstances], I have got them. On any other occasion I would not be near my skis and boots.

"Potential is something that can be great or can cut you deep. I cannot be unhappy with this - it is the world stage.

"Fifth in the Olympics, with four of my best mates in front of me, it is great."

He was hoping to emulate Jenny Jones, who won Britain's first Winter Olympic medal on snow in the Games' 90-year history, with bronze in snowboard slopestyle on Sunday.

The slopestyle squad headed to the Games hoping for at least one medal and all six athletes have recorded top-10 results.

Woods had plenty of support in the crowd at a sweltering Rosa Khutor, which included fellow Team GB athletes, UK Sport chief executive Liz Nicholl, and British Olympic Association chief executive Bill Sweeney.