Andy Murray rues poor start in Grigor Dimitrov Wimbledon loss

Andy Murray said a poor start cost him as he lost his Wimbledon title with an error-strewn performance against Grigor Dimitrov in the quarter-finals.

The Briton made 37 unforced errors in a 6-4 7-6 (7-4) 6-2 defeat on Centre Court that took just two hours.

Dimitrov said afterwards he had sensed Murray was not striking the ball well as early as the warm-up.

Watch the best of the action as Murray loses at Wimbledon

"I felt fine in the warm-up, but obviously got off to a bad start," Murray responded.

"That was the disappointing part of the match for me. I found a way to get myself back into it at the end of the second set but the start was not good enough. You need to start better.

"When you're playing best-of-five-set matches there's time to come back into it, and I had my opportunity at the end of the second set, but didn't get it."

Dimitrov, 23, dominated after coming through a testing first service game, and said that he had been optimistic following the knock-up.

"I think it's just a feeling," said the Bulgarian.

"I've practised quite a few times with him. I know how he's striking the ball when he's at his best. I know how he's playing when he's not at his best."

Murray had been on a 17-match winning streak at the All England Club stretching back to the London Olympics in 2012, and was looking to reach his sixth consecutive Wimbledon semi-final.

The Scot had impressed in his opening four matches and played down the weight of expectation that always surrounds him at Wimbledon.

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"I handled the pressure fine," said Murray. "I started the tournament well. I was playing good tennis. Today was a bad day, from my side.

"I made many mistakes, unforced errors, and then started going for too much and taking chances that weren't really there.

"I think I hit maybe one backhand winner the entire match, which isn't normally what I do, especially on this surface, so it was a tough day all around."

Dimitrov is through to his first Grand Slam semi-final, where he will face top seed Novak Djokovic, and the Bulgarian is confident he can go further still.

"Why would I have to be surprised?" he said. "It's a good feeling. I'm not going to hide that. It's a great feeling. I'm proud of what I did.

"But it's something that I've worked for, to get on to that stage, come out and switch to another gear. It's a quarter-final match, playing against the defending champion, against a gentleman like Andy. That adds a lot.

"At the same time, it's just another match for me."

Grigor Dimitrov and Andy Murray

Dimitrov beat Murray for the second time this year, after winning in Acapulco four months ago