Marc Marquez is too aggressive, says team-mate Dani Pedrosa

Dani Pedrosa has accused Repsol Honda team-mate Marc Marquez of being too aggressive in his riding.

Pedrosa, 28, crashed out of Sunday's race in Aragon soon after contact with Marquez broke his traction control system. Marquez went on to win.

The incident is being investigated by race stewards.

Pedrosa told BBC Sport: "I would like to know where is the limit in racing because I also can ride aggressively and over the limit."

World championship standings

  • Marc Marquez (Spa) - 278
  • Jorge Lorenzo (Spa) - 239
  • Dani Pedrosa (Spa) - 219
  • Valentino Rossi (Ita) - 185
  • Cal Crutchlow (GB) - 156

The official MotoGP twitter account confirmed on Monday  that both riders have been summoned to a hearing at the next race in Sepang next month to "technically analyse the Aragon race incident".

Pedrosa, who finished second in the championship last year, is 59 points behind leader Marquez with four rounds left, while Jorge Lorenzo sits 39 points behind the rookie. The maximum any rider can collect over the remaining four races is 100 points.

Marquez has courted controversy in the past, twice receiving a sanction from race stewards while riding in the Moto2 class, and also being condemned by Lorenzo  after the pair clashed in Jerez earlier this year.

Marquez escaped a sanction after the Jerez incident  but was given two penalty points for not observing yellow flags in a practice crash at Silverstone.

If he reaches four penalty points, he will have to start the next race from the back of the grid.

Following the latest controversy, Pedrosa said: "I think everyone should have the same cards to play the same rules.

"The relationship has always been fine with him but it's hard that this comes from your team mate.

"I can only say that I was doing the right thing and it's a shame that the guy that is trying to do the right thing always gets the worst part."

Marquez is aiming to become to first rider to win the premier class championship in his rookie year since Kenny Roberts in 1978.