BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

Front Page | In Depth | The Open
Open Championship
VIRTUAL COURSE | MASTERCLASS
OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP NEWS >>
PLAYERS TO WATCH | OPEN HISTORY >>
Getting to grips with golf
GETTING TO GRIPS WITH GOLF
Jargon-busting

EXPERT TIPS
Monty's mind games
Practice with Padraig
Learn about Links
GOLF EXPLAINED
Jargon-busting
Fascinating facts
FAQs

Jargon-busting
Birdie | Albatross | Bogey | Putt | Caddy | Fore | Mashie Niblick
BIRDIE

One under the par for that hole. The term is thought to have originated from the phrase "a bird of a shot."

In US slang, a bird was used to denote anything deemed to be excellent or wonderful.

When used by golfers, it might also imply that the ball "flew like a bird."

Players were claiming birdies as early as the 1910s.

Some information courtesy of the British Golf Museum,
based near St Andrews golf course in Scotland.

Copyright BBC ^^  Back to top