Trampoline World Championships: Kat Driscoll last in final

Great Britain's Kat Driscoll finished last in the individual final at the Trampoline World Championships.

A mistake brought the world number one's routine to a premature end, as she over-reached herself trying to increase the difficulty.

"I had nothing to lose so I tried to go out as big as I can and it didn't pay off," Driscoll told BBC Sport.

The 25-year-old had already secured Britain a place at the 2012 London Olympics by qualifying for the final.

"I'm disappointed to finish on that result, but I came out on a tough and nervy prelims day and qualified the Olympic place. I delivered when I needed to," she said.

"It's the end of four long days and I need to be proud of what we achieved at the start of it."

KAT DRISCOLL

Kat Driscoll
  • Born 13 March 1986 , grew up in Kent, moved to Tyne & Wear aged 18
  • Leads individual world rankings in women's trampoline and won 2011 World Cup series
  • Tops synchro world rankings - non-Olympic - alongside team-mate Amanda Parker
  • Worked full-time until February 2010 alongside training, now full-time trampolinist with funding from UK Sport
  • Trains six days a week for three hours each day, with six hours of training on Saturdays

Despite being the athlete to secure Team GB's Olympic spot, Driscoll is not automatically entitled to go to the Games as selection trials will decide who will represent Britain.

"I won't change my routines, I'm sticking with what I've done this year. It's about getting the hours done and getting them as close to perfection as I can," added Driscoll.

"Today, there was no point going out and trying to just do an OK routine - it wasn't going to be good enough. I had to try to go as big as I can, to make it as high and as clean as I could.

"I knew in the middle of that move that if I tried to take off, I would have been off the end of the trampoline. That's not a risk that I need to be taking.

"It's not good to not finish a routine in a world final, but I think I made the right decision in stopping."

China's Olympic champion, He Wenna, won the women's gold ahead of Canada's Rosannagh MacLennan, while GB duo Nathan Bailey and Luke Strong finished seventh in the men's synchro final, won by China's Xiao Tu and Dong Dong.

Meanwhile, Britain's men have suffered a setback in their quest to qualify a place at the Games and look unlikely to be represented at the Olympics.

The team initially believed Strong had done enough in Thursday's individual qualifying to reach January's Olympic test event, which offers a final chance to reach the Games.

However, after considerable confusion over differing interpretations of the Olympic qualification rules, world governing body the FIG expects Britain to miss out. A final decision is expected on 30 November.

British Gymnastics performance director Tim Jones explained the confusion: "We have now clarified that the three individual medallists from this World Championship [men's final] are included in the 16 gymnasts invited to compete at the test event.

"Based on this clarification, it is apparent that Great Britain will not be represented at the Olympic test event by an individual male."

Had the medallists not been included in that line-up, Strong would have placed highly enough in Birmingham to enter the test event and keep Olympic hopes alive.

Horst Kunze, the president of the technical committee overseeing trampoline qualification, admitted: "There was a lot of confusion. It should be a clearer system in the future."

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